Aerodynamic Heating - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Aerodynamic Heating

The Experts below are selected from a list of 234 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Aerodynamic Heating – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Zhixiang Zhao – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • transient thermal and pressurization performance of lo2 tank during helium pressurization combined with outside Aerodynamic Heating
    International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, 2013
    Co-Authors: Lei Wang, Yanzhong Li, Zhixiang Zhao
    Abstract:

    Abstract A computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model, which can simultaneously account for the heat exchanges inside the tank and outside Aerodynamic Heating, is constructed to investigate the transient thermal and pressurization performance of cryogenic tank during discharge. Besides the fluid and tank wall regions, the foam region is also considered as the computational domain. Reference enthalpy method is used to account for the outside Aerodynamic Heating effect. The predictive ability of the CFD model is evaluated on the basis of the comparisons between its results and experimental data and a good agreement is obtained. Then the model is used to predict a pressurized discharge event, and the thermal and pressurization behaviors are obtained and analyzed. The results show that outside Aerodynamic Heating cannot penetrate the foam layer to facilitate the pressurization performance. Conversely, a certain proportion of energy might be transferred from heated tank wall to foam layer, which exert a negative effect on the pressurization behaviors. The Aerodynamic Heating effect may not be accounted for in the CFD simulation of a foam-insulated tank, if the thermal performance at outer surface of the tank is not particularly concerned. Generally, this paper supplies an effective way to predict pressurization performance and expresses valid results of the thermal performance inside and outside the cryogenic tank during discharge. It is also stated that the CFD model has a better accuracy in predicting pressurization characteristics.

Mohamed Gadelhak – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • newly identified principle for Aerodynamic Heating in hypersonic flows
    Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 2018
    Co-Authors: Xi Chen, Jiezhi Wu, Shiyi Chen, Mohamed Gadelhak
    Abstract:

    Instability evolution in a transitional hypersonic boundary layer and its effects on Aerodynamic Heating are investigated over a 260 mm long flared cone. Experiments are conducted in a Mach 6 wind tunnel using Rayleigh-scattering flow visualization, fast-response pressure sensors, fluorescent temperature-sensitive paint (TSP) and particle image velocimetry (PIV). Calculations are also performed based on both the parabolized stability equations (PSE) and direct numerical simulations (DNS). Four unit Reynolds numbers are studied, 5.4, 7.6, 9.7 and $11.7\times 10^{6}~\text{m}^{-1}$ . It is found that there exist two peaks of surface-temperature rise along the streamwise direction of the model. The first one (denoted as HS) is at the region where the second-mode instability reaches its maximum value. The second one (denoted as HT) is at the region where the transition is completed. Increasing the unit Reynolds number promotes the second-mode dissipation but increases the strength of local Aerodynamic Heating at HS. Furthermore, the heat generation rates induced by the dilatation and shear processes (respectively denoted as $w_{\unicode[STIX]{x1D703}}$ and $w_{\unicode[STIX]{x1D714}}$ ) were investigated. The former item includes both the pressure work $w_{\unicode[STIX]{x1D703}1}$ and dilatational viscous dissipation $w_{\unicode[STIX]{x1D703}2}$ . The Aerodynamic Heating in HS mainly arose from the high-frequency compression and expansion of fluid accompanying the second mode. The dilatation Heating, especially $w_{\unicode[STIX]{x1D703}1}$ , was more than five times its shear counterpart. In a limited region, the underestimated $w_{\unicode[STIX]{x1D703}2}$ was also larger than $w_{\unicode[STIX]{x1D714}}$ . As the second-mode waves decay downstream, the low-frequency waves continue to grow, with the consequent shear-induced Heating increasing. The latter brings about a second, weaker growth of surface-temperature HT. A theoretical analysis is provided to interpret the temperature distribution resulting from the Aerodynamic Heating.

  • Aerodynamic Heating in transitional hypersonic boundary layers role of second mode instability
    Physics of Fluids, 2018
    Co-Authors: Yiding Zhu, Xi Chen, Shiyi Chen, Cunbiao Lee, Mohamed Gadelhak
    Abstract:

    The evolution of second-mode instabilities in hypersonic boundary layers and its effects on Aerodynamic Heating are investigated. Experiments are conducted in a Mach 6 wind tunnel using fast-response pressure sensors, fluorescent temperature-sensitive paint, and particle image velocimetry. Calculations based on parabolic stability equations and direct numerical simulations are also performed. It is found that second-mode waves, accompanied by high-frequency alternating fluid compression and expansion, produce intense Aerodynamic Heating in a small region that rapidly heats the fluid passing through it. As the second-mode waves decay downstream, the dilatation-induced Aerodynamic Heating decreases while its shear-induced counterpart keeps growing. The latter brings about a second growth of the surface temperature when transition is completed.

  • Aerodynamic Heating in hypersonic boundary layers role of dilatational waves
    arXiv: Fluid Dynamics, 2016
    Co-Authors: Yiding Zhu, Xi Chen, Shiyi Chen, Cunbiao Lee, Mohamed Gadelhak
    Abstract:

    The evolution of multi-mode instabilities in a hypersonic boundary layer and their effects on Aerodynamic Heating are investigated. Experiments are conducted in a Mach 6 wind tunnel using Rayleigh-scattering flow visualization, fast-response pressure sensors, fluorescent temperature-sensitive paint (TSP), and particle image velocimetry (PIV). Calculations are also performed based on both parabolized stability equations (PSE) and direct numerical simulations (DNS). It is found that second-mode dilatational waves, accompanied by high-frequency alternating fluid compression and expansion, produce intense Aerodynamic Heating in a small region that rapidly heats the fluid passing through it. As a result, the surface temperature rapidly increases and results in an overshoot over the nominal transitional value. When the dilatation waves decay downstream, the surface temperature decreases gradually until transition is completed. A theoretical analysis is provided to interpret the temperature distribution affected by the Aerodynamic Heating.

Xi Chen – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • newly identified principle for Aerodynamic Heating in hypersonic flows
    Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 2018
    Co-Authors: Xi Chen, Jiezhi Wu, Shiyi Chen, Mohamed Gadelhak
    Abstract:

    Instability evolution in a transitional hypersonic boundary layer and its effects on Aerodynamic Heating are investigated over a 260 mm long flared cone. Experiments are conducted in a Mach 6 wind tunnel using Rayleigh-scattering flow visualization, fast-response pressure sensors, fluorescent temperature-sensitive paint (TSP) and particle image velocimetry (PIV). Calculations are also performed based on both the parabolized stability equations (PSE) and direct numerical simulations (DNS). Four unit Reynolds numbers are studied, 5.4, 7.6, 9.7 and $11.7\times 10^{6}~\text{m}^{-1}$ . It is found that there exist two peaks of surface-temperature rise along the streamwise direction of the model. The first one (denoted as HS) is at the region where the second-mode instability reaches its maximum value. The second one (denoted as HT) is at the region where the transition is completed. Increasing the unit Reynolds number promotes the second-mode dissipation but increases the strength of local Aerodynamic Heating at HS. Furthermore, the heat generation rates induced by the dilatation and shear processes (respectively denoted as $w_{\unicode[STIX]{x1D703}}$ and $w_{\unicode[STIX]{x1D714}}$ ) were investigated. The former item includes both the pressure work $w_{\unicode[STIX]{x1D703}1}$ and dilatational viscous dissipation $w_{\unicode[STIX]{x1D703}2}$ . The Aerodynamic Heating in HS mainly arose from the high-frequency compression and expansion of fluid accompanying the second mode. The dilatation Heating, especially $w_{\unicode[STIX]{x1D703}1}$ , was more than five times its shear counterpart. In a limited region, the underestimated $w_{\unicode[STIX]{x1D703}2}$ was also larger than $w_{\unicode[STIX]{x1D714}}$ . As the second-mode waves decay downstream, the low-frequency waves continue to grow, with the consequent shear-induced Heating increasing. The latter brings about a second, weaker growth of surface-temperature HT. A theoretical analysis is provided to interpret the temperature distribution resulting from the Aerodynamic Heating.

  • Newly identified principle for Aerodynamic Heating in hypersonic flows
    Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 2018
    Co-Authors: Yiding Zhu, Xi Chen, Shiyi Chen, Cunbiao Lee, Mohamed Gad-el-hak
    Abstract:

    Instability evolution in a transitional hypersonic boundary layer and its effects on Aerodynamic Heating are investigated over a 260 mm long flared cone. Experiments are conducted in a Mach 6 wind tunnel using Rayleigh-scattering flow visualization, fast-response pressure sensors, fluorescent temperature-sensitive paint (TSP) and particle image velocimetry (PIV). Calculations are also performed based on both the parabolized stability equations (PSE) and direct numerical simulations (DNS). Four unit Reynolds numbers are studied, 5.4, 7.6, 9.7 and . It is found that there exist two peaks of surface-temperature rise along the streamwise direction of the model. The first one (denoted as HS) is at the region where the second-mode instability reaches its maximum value. The second one (denoted as HT) is at the region where the transition is completed. Increasing the unit Reynolds number promotes the second-mode dissipation but increases the strength of local Aerodynamic Heating at HS. Furthermore, the heat generation rates induced by the dilatation and shear processes (respectively denoted as and ) were investigated. The former item includes both the pressure work and dilatational viscous dissipation . The Aerodynamic Heating in HS mainly arose from the high-frequency compression and expansion of fluid accompanying the second mode. The dilatation Heating, especially , was more than five times its shear counterpart. In a limited region, the underestimated was also larger than . As the second-mode waves decay downstream, the low-frequency waves continue to grow, with the consequent shear-induced Heating increasing. The latter brings about a second, weaker growth of surface-temperature HT. A theoretical analysis is provided to interpret the temperature distribution resulting from the Aerodynamic Heating.

  • Aerodynamic Heating in transitional hypersonic boundary layers role of second mode instability
    Physics of Fluids, 2018
    Co-Authors: Yiding Zhu, Xi Chen, Shiyi Chen, Cunbiao Lee, Mohamed Gadelhak
    Abstract:

    The evolution of second-mode instabilities in hypersonic boundary layers and its effects on Aerodynamic Heating are investigated. Experiments are conducted in a Mach 6 wind tunnel using fast-response pressure sensors, fluorescent temperature-sensitive paint, and particle image velocimetry. Calculations based on parabolic stability equations and direct numerical simulations are also performed. It is found that second-mode waves, accompanied by high-frequency alternating fluid compression and expansion, produce intense Aerodynamic Heating in a small region that rapidly heats the fluid passing through it. As the second-mode waves decay downstream, the dilatation-induced Aerodynamic Heating decreases while its shear-induced counterpart keeps growing. The latter brings about a second growth of the surface temperature when transition is completed.

Yiding Zhu – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Newly identified principle for Aerodynamic Heating in hypersonic flows
    Journal of Fluid Mechanics, 2018
    Co-Authors: Yiding Zhu, Xi Chen, Shiyi Chen, Cunbiao Lee, Mohamed Gad-el-hak
    Abstract:

    Instability evolution in a transitional hypersonic boundary layer and its effects on Aerodynamic Heating are investigated over a 260 mm long flared cone. Experiments are conducted in a Mach 6 wind tunnel using Rayleigh-scattering flow visualization, fast-response pressure sensors, fluorescent temperature-sensitive paint (TSP) and particle image velocimetry (PIV). Calculations are also performed based on both the parabolized stability equations (PSE) and direct numerical simulations (DNS). Four unit Reynolds numbers are studied, 5.4, 7.6, 9.7 and . It is found that there exist two peaks of surface-temperature rise along the streamwise direction of the model. The first one (denoted as HS) is at the region where the second-mode instability reaches its maximum value. The second one (denoted as HT) is at the region where the transition is completed. Increasing the unit Reynolds number promotes the second-mode dissipation but increases the strength of local Aerodynamic Heating at HS. Furthermore, the heat generation rates induced by the dilatation and shear processes (respectively denoted as and ) were investigated. The former item includes both the pressure work and dilatational viscous dissipation . The Aerodynamic Heating in HS mainly arose from the high-frequency compression and expansion of fluid accompanying the second mode. The dilatation Heating, especially , was more than five times its shear counterpart. In a limited region, the underestimated was also larger than . As the second-mode waves decay downstream, the low-frequency waves continue to grow, with the consequent shear-induced Heating increasing. The latter brings about a second, weaker growth of surface-temperature HT. A theoretical analysis is provided to interpret the temperature distribution resulting from the Aerodynamic Heating.

  • Aerodynamic Heating in transitional hypersonic boundary layers role of second mode instability
    Physics of Fluids, 2018
    Co-Authors: Yiding Zhu, Xi Chen, Shiyi Chen, Cunbiao Lee, Mohamed Gadelhak
    Abstract:

    The evolution of second-mode instabilities in hypersonic boundary layers and its effects on Aerodynamic Heating are investigated. Experiments are conducted in a Mach 6 wind tunnel using fast-response pressure sensors, fluorescent temperature-sensitive paint, and particle image velocimetry. Calculations based on parabolic stability equations and direct numerical simulations are also performed. It is found that second-mode waves, accompanied by high-frequency alternating fluid compression and expansion, produce intense Aerodynamic Heating in a small region that rapidly heats the fluid passing through it. As the second-mode waves decay downstream, the dilatation-induced Aerodynamic Heating decreases while its shear-induced counterpart keeps growing. The latter brings about a second growth of the surface temperature when transition is completed.

  • Aerodynamic Heating in Hypersonic Boundary Layers:\ Role of Dilatational Waves
    arXiv: Fluid Dynamics, 2016
    Co-Authors: Yiding Zhu, Xi Chen, Shiyi Chen, Cunbiao Lee, Mohamed Gad-el-hak
    Abstract:

    The evolution of multi-mode instabilities in a hypersonic boundary layer and their effects on Aerodynamic Heating are investigated. Experiments are conducted in a Mach 6 wind tunnel using Rayleigh-scattering flow visualization, fast-response pressure sensors, fluorescent temperature-sensitive paint (TSP), and particle image velocimetry (PIV). Calculations are also performed based on both parabolized stability equations (PSE) and direct numerical simulations (DNS). It is found that second-mode dilatational waves, accompanied by high-frequency alternating fluid compression and expansion, produce intense Aerodynamic Heating in a small region that rapidly heats the fluid passing through it. As a result, the surface temperature rapidly increases and results in an overshoot over the nominal transitional value. When the dilatation waves decay downstream, the surface temperature decreases gradually until transition is completed. A theoretical analysis is provided to interpret the temperature distribution affected by the Aerodynamic Heating.

Lei Wang – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • transient thermal and pressurization performance of lo2 tank during helium pressurization combined with outside Aerodynamic Heating
    International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer, 2013
    Co-Authors: Lei Wang, Yanzhong Li, Zhixiang Zhao
    Abstract:

    Abstract A computational fluid dynamic (CFD) model, which can simultaneously account for the heat exchanges inside the tank and outside Aerodynamic Heating, is constructed to investigate the transient thermal and pressurization performance of cryogenic tank during discharge. Besides the fluid and tank wall regions, the foam region is also considered as the computational domain. Reference enthalpy method is used to account for the outside Aerodynamic Heating effect. The predictive ability of the CFD model is evaluated on the basis of the comparisons between its results and experimental data and a good agreement is obtained. Then the model is used to predict a pressurized discharge event, and the thermal and pressurization behaviors are obtained and analyzed. The results show that outside Aerodynamic Heating cannot penetrate the foam layer to facilitate the pressurization performance. Conversely, a certain proportion of energy might be transferred from heated tank wall to foam layer, which exert a negative effect on the pressurization behaviors. The Aerodynamic Heating effect may not be accounted for in the CFD simulation of a foam-insulated tank, if the thermal performance at outer surface of the tank is not particularly concerned. Generally, this paper supplies an effective way to predict pressurization performance and expresses valid results of the thermal performance inside and outside the cryogenic tank during discharge. It is also stated that the CFD model has a better accuracy in predicting pressurization characteristics.