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Duangkamol Kunthalert – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • a scorpion venom peptide derivative bmkn 22 with potent antibiofilm activity against pseudomonas Aeruginosa
    PLOS ONE, 2019
    Co-Authors: Kittitat Teerapo, Sittiruk Roytrakul, Anchalee Sistayanarain, Duangkamol Kunthalert
    Abstract:

    Pseudomonas Aeruginosa is a leading cause of nosocomial and serious life-threatening infections and infections caused by this bacterium continue to pose a major medical challenge worldwide. The ability of P. Aeruginosa to produce multiple virulence factors and in particular to form biofbiofilms makes this bacterium resistant to all known antibiotics. As a consequence, standard antibiotic therapy are increasingly become ineffective to clear such infections associated with biofilms. In search for novel effective agents to combat P. Aeruginosa biofilm infections, a series of the BmKn‒2 scorpion venom peptide and its truncated derivatives were synthesized and their antibiofilm activities assessed. Among the peptides tested, BmKn‒22 peptide, which was a modified peptide of the parental BmKn‒2 scorpion venom peptide, clearly demonstrated the most potential inhibitory activity against P. Aeruginosa biofilms without affecting the bacterial growth. This peptide was not only capable of inhibiting the formation of P. Aeruginosa biofilms, but also disrupting the established biofilms of P. Aeruginosa. Additionally, BmKn‒22 peptide was able to inhibit the production of key virulence factor pyocyanin of P. Aeruginosa. Our results also showed that BmKn‒22 peptide significantly reduced lasI and rhlR expression, and suggested that BmKn‒22 peptide-mediated inhibition of P. Aeruginosa biofilms and virulence factors was achieved through the components of quorum-sensing systems. Combination of BmKn‒22 peptide with azithromycin resulted in a remarkable reduction P. Aeruginosa biofilms. Since this peptide exhibited low toxicity to mammalian cells, all our results therefore indicate that the BmKn‒22 peptide is a promising antibiofilm agent against P. Aeruginosa and warrant further development of this peptide as a novel therapeutic for treatment of P. Aeruginosa‒associated biofilm infections.

  • A scorpion venom peptide derivative BmKn‒22 with potent antibiofilm activity against Pseudomonas Aeruginosa.
    PLOS ONE, 2019
    Co-Authors: Kittitat Teerapo, Sittiruk Roytrakul, Anchalee Sistayanarain, Duangkamol Kunthalert
    Abstract:

    Pseudomonas Aeruginosa is a leading cause of nosocomial and serious life-threatening infections and infections caused by this bacterium continue to pose a major medical challenge worldwide. The ability of P. Aeruginosa to produce multiple virulence factors and in particular to form biofbiofilms makes this bacterium resistant to all known antibiotics. As a consequence, standard antibiotic therapy are increasingly become ineffective to clear such infections associated with biofilms. In search for novel effective agents to combat P. Aeruginosa biofilm infections, a series of the BmKn‒2 scorpion venom peptide and its truncated derivatives were synthesized and their antibiofilm activities assessed. Among the peptides tested, BmKn‒22 peptide, which was a modified peptide of the parental BmKn‒2 scorpion venom peptide, clearly demonstrated the most potential inhibitory activity against P. Aeruginosa biofilms without affecting the bacterial growth. This peptide was not only capable of inhibiting the formation of P. Aeruginosa biofilms, but also disrupting the established biofilms of P. Aeruginosa. Additionally, BmKn‒22 peptide was able to inhibit the production of key virulence factor pyocyanin of P. Aeruginosa. Our results also showed that BmKn‒22 peptide significantly reduced lasI and rhlR expression, and suggested that BmKn‒22 peptide-mediated inhibition of P. Aeruginosa biofilms and virulence factors was achieved through the components of quorum-sensing systems. Combination of BmKn‒22 peptide with azithromycin resulted in a remarkable reduction P. Aeruginosa biofilms. Since this peptide exhibited low toxicity to mammalian cells, all our results therefore indicate that the BmKn‒22 peptide is a promising antibiofilm agent against P. Aeruginosa and warrant further development of this peptide as a novel therapeutic for treatment of P. Aeruginosa‒associated biofilm infections.

Kittitat Teerapo – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • a scorpion venom peptide derivative bmkn 22 with potent antibiofilm activity against pseudomonas Aeruginosa
    PLOS ONE, 2019
    Co-Authors: Kittitat Teerapo, Sittiruk Roytrakul, Anchalee Sistayanarain, Duangkamol Kunthalert
    Abstract:

    Pseudomonas Aeruginosa is a leading cause of nosocomial and serious life-threatening infections and infections caused by this bacterium continue to pose a major medical challenge worldwide. The ability of P. Aeruginosa to produce multiple virulence factors and in particular to form biofilms makes this bacterium resistant to all known antibiotics. As a consequence, standard antibiotic therapy are increasingly become ineffective to clear such infections associated with biofilms. In search for novel effective agents to combat P. Aeruginosa biofilm infections, a series of the BmKn‒2 scorpion venom peptide and its truncated derivatives were synthesized and their antibiofilm activities assessed. Among the peptides tested, BmKn‒22 peptide, which was a modified peptide of the parental BmKn‒2 scorpion venom peptide, clearly demonstrated the most potential inhibitory activity against P. Aeruginosa biofilms without affecting the bacterial growth. This peptide was not only capable of inhibiting the formation of P. Aeruginosa biofilms, but also disrupting the established biofilms of P. Aeruginosa. Additionally, BmKn‒22 peptide was able to inhibit the production of key virulence factor pyocyanin of P. Aeruginosa. Our results also showed that BmKn‒22 peptide significantly reduced lasI and rhlR expression, and suggested that BmKn‒22 peptide-mediated inhibition of P. Aeruginosa biofilms and virulence factors was achieved through the components of quorum-sensing systems. Combination of BmKn‒22 peptide with azithromycin resulted in a remarkable reduction P. Aeruginosa biofilms. Since this peptide exhibited low toxicity to mammalian cells, all our results therefore indicate that the BmKn‒22 peptide is a promising antibiofilm agent against P. Aeruginosa and warrant further development of this peptide as a novel therapeutic for treatment of P. Aeruginosa‒associated biofilm infections.

  • A scorpion venom peptide derivative BmKn‒22 with potent antibiofilm activity against Pseudomonas Aeruginosa.
    PLOS ONE, 2019
    Co-Authors: Kittitat Teerapo, Sittiruk Roytrakul, Anchalee Sistayanarain, Duangkamol Kunthalert
    Abstract:

    Pseudomonas Aeruginosa is a leading cause of nosocomial and serious life-threatening infections and infections caused by this bacterium continue to pose a major medical challenge worldwide. The ability of P. Aeruginosa to produce multiple virulence factors and in particular to form biofilms makes this bacterium resistant to all known antibiotics. As a consequence, standard antibiotic therapy are increasingly become ineffective to clear such infections associated with biofilms. In search for novel effective agents to combat P. Aeruginosa biofilm infections, a series of the BmKn‒2 scorpion venom peptide and its truncated derivatives were synthesized and their antibiofilm activities assessed. Among the peptides tested, BmKn‒22 peptide, which was a modified peptide of the parental BmKn‒2 scorpion venom peptide, clearly demonstrated the most potential inhibitory activity against P. Aeruginosa biofilms without affecting the bacterial growth. This peptide was not only capable of inhibiting the formation of P. Aeruginosa biofilms, but also disrupting the established biofilms of P. Aeruginosa. Additionally, BmKn‒22 peptide was able to inhibit the production of key virulence factor pyocyanin of P. Aeruginosa. Our results also showed that BmKn‒22 peptide significantly reduced lasI and rhlR expression, and suggested that BmKn‒22 peptide-mediated inhibition of P. Aeruginosa biofilms and virulence factors was achieved through the components of quorum-sensing systems. Combination of BmKn‒22 peptide with azithromycin resulted in a remarkable reduction P. Aeruginosa biofilms. Since this peptide exhibited low toxicity to mammalian cells, all our results therefore indicate that the BmKn‒22 peptide is a promising antibiofilm agent against P. Aeruginosa and warrant further development of this peptide as a novel therapeutic for treatment of P. Aeruginosa‒associated biofilm infections.

Sittiruk Roytrakul – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • a scorpion venom peptide derivative bmkn 22 with potent antibiofilm activity against pseudomonas Aeruginosa
    PLOS ONE, 2019
    Co-Authors: Kittitat Teerapo, Sittiruk Roytrakul, Anchalee Sistayanarain, Duangkamol Kunthalert
    Abstract:

    Pseudomonas Aeruginosa is a leading cause of nosocomial and serious life-threatening infections and infections caused by this bacterium continue to pose a major medical challenge worldwide. The ability of P. Aeruginosa to produce multiple virulence factors and in particular to form biofilms makes this bacterium resistant to all known antibiotics. As a consequence, standard antibiotic therapy are increasingly become ineffective to clear such infections associated with biofilms. In search for novel effective agents to combat P. Aeruginosa biofilm infections, a series of the BmKn‒2 scorpion venom peptide and its truncated derivatives were synthesized and their antibiofilm activities assessed. Among the peptides tested, BmKn‒22 peptide, which was a modified peptide of the parental BmKn‒2 scorpion venom peptide, clearly demonstrated the most potential inhibitory activity against P. Aeruginosa biofilms without affecting the bacterial growth. This peptide was not only capable of inhibiting the formation of P. Aeruginosa biofilms, but also disrupting the established biofilms of P. Aeruginosa. Additionally, BmKn‒22 peptide was able to inhibit the production of key virulence factor pyocyanin of P. Aeruginosa. Our results also showed that BmKn‒22 peptide significantly reduced lasI and rhlR expression, and suggested that BmKn‒22 peptide-mediated inhibition of P. Aeruginosa biofilms and virulence factors was achieved through the components of quorum-sensing systems. Combination of BmKn‒22 peptide with azithromycin resulted in a remarkable reduction P. Aeruginosa biofilms. Since this peptide exhibited low toxicity to mammalian cells, all our results therefore indicate that the BmKn‒22 peptide is a promising antibiofilm agent against P. Aeruginosa and warrant further development of this peptide as a novel therapeutic for treatment of P. Aeruginosa‒associated biofilm infections.

  • A scorpion venom peptide derivative BmKn‒22 with potent antibiofilm activity against Pseudomonas Aeruginosa.
    PLOS ONE, 2019
    Co-Authors: Kittitat Teerapo, Sittiruk Roytrakul, Anchalee Sistayanarain, Duangkamol Kunthalert
    Abstract:

    Pseudomonas Aeruginosa is a leading cause of nosocomial and serious life-threatening infections and infections caused by this bacterium continue to pose a major medical challenge worldwide. The ability of P. Aeruginosa to produce multiple virulence factors and in particular to form biofilms makes this bacterium resistant to all known antibiotics. As a consequence, standard antibiotic therapy are increasingly become ineffective to clear such infections associated with biofilms. In search for novel effective agents to combat P. Aeruginosa biofilm infections, a series of the BmKn‒2 scorpion venom peptide and its truncated derivatives were synthesized and their antibiofilm activities assessed. Among the peptides tested, BmKn‒22 peptide, which was a modified peptide of the parental BmKn‒2 scorpion venom peptide, clearly demonstrated the most potential inhibitory activity against P. Aeruginosa biofilms without affecting the bacterial growth. This peptide was not only capable of inhibiting the formation of P. Aeruginosa biofilms, but also disrupting the established biofilms of P. Aeruginosa. Additionally, BmKn‒22 peptide was able to inhibit the production of key virulence factor pyocyanin of P. Aeruginosa. Our results also showed that BmKn‒22 peptide significantly reduced lasI and rhlR expression, and suggested that BmKn‒22 peptide-mediated inhibition of P. Aeruginosa biofilms and virulence factors was achieved through the components of quorum-sensing systems. Combination of BmKn‒22 peptide with azithromycin resulted in a remarkable reduction P. Aeruginosa biofilms. Since this peptide exhibited low toxicity to mammalian cells, all our results therefore indicate that the BmKn‒22 peptide is a promising antibiofilm agent against P. Aeruginosa and warrant further development of this peptide as a novel therapeutic for treatment of P. Aeruginosa‒associated biofilm infections.

Anchalee Sistayanarain – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • a scorpion venom peptide derivative bmkn 22 with potent antibiofilm activity against pseudomonas Aeruginosa
    PLOS ONE, 2019
    Co-Authors: Kittitat Teerapo, Sittiruk Roytrakul, Anchalee Sistayanarain, Duangkamol Kunthalert
    Abstract:

    Pseudomonas Aeruginosa is a leading cause of nosocomial and serious life-threatening infections and infections caused by this bacterium continue to pose a major medical challenge worldwide. The ability of P. Aeruginosa to produce multiple virulence factors and in particular to form biofilms makes this bacterium resistant to all known antibiotics. As a consequence, standard antibiotic therapy are increasingly become ineffective to clear such infections associated with biofilms. In search for novel effective agents to combat P. Aeruginosa biofilm infections, a series of the BmKn‒2 scorpion venom peptide and its truncated derivatives were synthesized and their antibiofilm activities assessed. Among the peptides tested, BmKn‒22 peptide, which was a modified peptide of the parental BmKn‒2 scorpion venom peptide, clearly demonstrated the most potential inhibitory activity against P. Aeruginosa biofilms without affecting the bacterial growth. This peptide was not only capable of inhibiting the formation of P. Aeruginosa biofilms, but also disrupting the established biofilms of P. Aeruginosa. Additionally, BmKn‒22 peptide was able to inhibit the production of key virulence factor pyocyanin of P. Aeruginosa. Our results also showed that BmKn‒22 peptide significantly reduced lasI and rhlR expression, and suggested that BmKn‒22 peptide-mediated inhibition of P. Aeruginosa biofilms and virulence factors was achieved through the components of quorum-sensing systems. Combination of BmKn‒22 peptide with azithromycin resulted in a remarkable reduction P. Aeruginosa biofilms. Since this peptide exhibited low toxicity to mammalian cells, all our results therefore indicate that the BmKn‒22 peptide is a promising antibiofilm agent against P. Aeruginosa and warrant further development of this peptide as a novel therapeutic for treatment of P. Aeruginosa‒associated biofilm infections.

  • A scorpion venom peptide derivative BmKn‒22 with potent antibiofilm activity against Pseudomonas Aeruginosa.
    PLOS ONE, 2019
    Co-Authors: Kittitat Teerapo, Sittiruk Roytrakul, Anchalee Sistayanarain, Duangkamol Kunthalert
    Abstract:

    Pseudomonas Aeruginosa is a leading cause of nosocomial and serious life-threatening infections and infections caused by this bacterium continue to pose a major medical challenge worldwide. The ability of P. Aeruginosa to produce multiple virulence factors and in particular to form biofilms makes this bacterium resistant to all known antibiotics. As a consequence, standard antibiotic therapy are increasingly become ineffective to clear such infections associated with biofilms. In search for novel effective agents to combat P. Aeruginosa biofilm infections, a series of the BmKn‒2 scorpion venom peptide and its truncated derivatives were synthesized and their antibiofilm activities assessed. Among the peptides tested, BmKn‒22 peptide, which was a modified peptide of the parental BmKn‒2 scorpion venom peptide, clearly demonstrated the most potential inhibitory activity against P. Aeruginosa biofilms without affecting the bacterial growth. This peptide was not only capable of inhibiting the formation of P. Aeruginosa biofilms, but also disrupting the established biofilms of P. Aeruginosa. Additionally, BmKn‒22 peptide was able to inhibit the production of key virulence factor pyocyanin of P. Aeruginosa. Our results also showed that BmKn‒22 peptide significantly reduced lasI and rhlR expression, and suggested that BmKn‒22 peptide-mediated inhibition of P. Aeruginosa biofilms and virulence factors was achieved through the components of quorum-sensing systems. Combination of BmKn‒22 peptide with azithromycin resulted in a remarkable reduction P. Aeruginosa biofilms. Since this peptide exhibited low toxicity to mammalian cells, all our results therefore indicate that the BmKn‒22 peptide is a promising antibiofilm agent against P. Aeruginosa and warrant further development of this peptide as a novel therapeutic for treatment of P. Aeruginosa‒associated biofilm infections.

Ronald G. Crystal – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Expression of B-Cell Activating Factor Enhances Protective Immunity of a Vaccine against Pseudomonas Aeruginosa
    Infection and immunity, 2009
    Co-Authors: Christine Tertilt, Ju Joh, Anja Krause, Paigee Chou, Kristin Schneeweiss, Ronald G. Crystal, Stefan Worgall
    Abstract:

    B-cell activating factor (BAFF), a member of the TNF family, is a potent cytokine with stimulatory effects on B and T cells. To evaluate the potential of transient overexpression of BAFF to enhance vaccine immunogenicity, a replication-deficient adenovirus expressing full-length murine BAFF (AdBAFF) was tested in a mouse vaccine model against Pseudomonas Aeruginosa. When coadministered with heat-killed P. Aeruginosa, AdBAFF mediated a significant increase in anti-P. Aeruginosa-specific serum and lung mucosal antibodies and resulted in improved protection against a lethal respiratory challenge with P. Aeruginosa. This effect was independent of the site of administration of AdBAFF and was observed both when AdBAFF was given simultaneously with heat-killed P. Aeruginosa as well as when AdBAFF was administered 4 weeks after immunization with heat-killed P. Aeruginosa. These data demonstrate that a temporal increase in systemic BAFF levels is able to augment a P. Aeruginosa-specific immune response upon immunization with heat-killed P. Aeruginosa, suggesting that the immune-stimulatory effects of BAFF may be exploited as a molecular adjuvant for genetic vaccines.

  • Protection against pulmonary infection with Pseudomonas Aeruginosa following immunization with P. Aeruginosa-pulsed dendritic cells.
    Infection and immunity, 2001
    Co-Authors: Stefan Worgall, Toshiaki Kikuchi, Ravi Singh, Katherine Martushova, Leah Lande, Ronald G. Crystal
    Abstract:

    To develop a Pseudomonas Aeruginosa vaccine that allows the host immune system to select the antigens, we hypothesized that dendritic cells (DC) pulsed with P. Aeruginosa would induce protective immunity against pulmonary infections with P. Aeruginosa. Incubation of murine bone marrow-derived DC with P. Aeruginosa in vitro led to uptake of P. Aeruginosa and activation of the DC. Spleen-derived CD4(+) cells from mice immunized with P. Aeruginosa-pulsed DC showed increased proliferation, demonstrating that DC pulsed with P. Aeruginosa were capable of eliciting a P. Aeruginosa-specific immune response. To evaluate if P. Aeruginosa-pulsed DC can induce protective immunity against P. Aeruginosa pulmonary infection, DC incubated with P. Aeruginosa in vitro were administered systemically to syngeneic mice, and the mice were then challenged by intrapulmonary infection with P. Aeruginosa (5 x 10(4) CFU/mouse) 13 days later. Unimmunized control mice and mice who had previously received naive DC or DC stimulated with lipopolysaccharide or Escherichia coli died within 72 h. In contrast, 45% of mice receiving P. Aeruginosa-pulsed DC demonstrated prolonged survival (>14 days). Finally, DC-pulsed with heat-inactivated P. Aeruginosa protected CD8(-/-) but not CD4(-/-) mice, demonstrating that CD4(+) T cells were required for the DC pulsed with P. Aeruginosa to induce protective immunity.