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Affective Response

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Bethany M Kwan – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • psychological need satisfaction intrinsic motivation and Affective Response to exercise in adolescents
    Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 2013
    Co-Authors: Margaret Schneider, Bethany M Kwan
    Abstract:

    ObjectivesTo further understanding of the factors influencing adolescents’ motivations for physical activity, the relationship of variables derived from Self-Determination Theory to adolescents’ Affective Response to exercise was examined.DesignCorrelational.MethodAdolescents (N = 182) self-reported psychological needs satisfaction (perceived competence, relatedness, and autonomy) and intrinsic motivation related to exercise. In two clinic visits, adolescents reported their affect before, during, and after a moderate-intensity and a hard-intensity exercise task.ResultsAffective Response to exercise and psychological needs satisfaction independently contributed to the prediction of intrinsic motivation in hierarchical linear regression models. The association between Affective Response to exercise and intrinsic motivation was partially mediated by psychological needs satisfaction.ConclusionsIntrinsic motivation for exercise among adolescents may be enhanced when the environment supports perceived competence, relatedness, and autonomy, and when adolescents participate in activities that they find enjoyable.

  • in task and post task Affective Response to exercise translating exercise intentions into behaviour
    British Journal of Health Psychology, 2010
    Co-Authors: Bethany M Kwan, Angela D Bryan
    Abstract:

    Objectives To test whether Affective Response to an acute bout of exercise can predict regular voluntary exercise, and specifically whether a positive Affective Response helps translate intentions into behaviour. Design A prospective correlational design. Methods Participants (N=127) recruited from the community reported intentions to engage in voluntary exercise and frequency of participation in voluntary exercise both at baseline and at a 3-month follow-up. Self-reported positive affect, negative affect, tranquillity, and fatigue were assessed during a bout of moderate intensity exercise. Results Within subject slopes for increases in positive affect and decreases in fatigue during exercise, and increased tranquillity and decreased fatigue post-exercise were associated with more frequent participation in exercise at follow-up. Changes in negative affect did not predict exercise at follow-up; however, this was likely due to floor effects leading to lack of baseline variability in negative affect. Importantly, a positive Affective Response to exercise moderated the intention–behaviour relationship, such that those who responded to exercise more favourably exhibited stronger relationships between intentions and future exercise behaviour Conclusions We conclude that exercise-related increases in positive affect and tranquillity and decreases in feelings of fatigue can aid in the successful translation of exercise intentions into behaviour.

  • Affective Response to exercise as a component of exercise motivation attitudes norms self efficacy and temporal stability of intentions
    Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 2010
    Co-Authors: Bethany M Kwan, Angela D Bryan
    Abstract:

    Abstract Problem A positive Affective Response is associated with increased participation in voluntary exercise, but the mechanisms by which this occurs are not well known. Consistent with a Theory of Planned Behavior perspective, we tested whether Affective Response to exercise leads to greater motivation in terms of attitudes, subjective norms, self-efficacy and intentions to exercise. We were also specifically interested in whether a positive Affective Response leads to more temporally stable intentions. Method Participants ( N  = 127) self-reported Theory of Planned Behavior constructs and exercise behavior at baseline and three months later, and provided reports of exercise-related affect during a 30-minute bout of moderate intensity treadmill exercise at baseline. Results We show that participants who experience greater improvements in positive affect, negative affect and fatigue during exercise tended to report more positive attitudes, exercise self-efficacy and intentions to exercise three months later. Affective Response was not predictive of subjective norms. As hypothesized, positive Affective Response was associated with more stable intentions over time. Conclusions We conclude that a positive Affective Response to acute bouts of exercise can aid in building and sustaining exercise motivation over time.

David M. Williams – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Affective Response to physical activity as an intermediate phenotype
    Social science & medicine (1982), 2018
    Co-Authors: Harold H. Lee, Jessica A. Emerson, Lauren Connell Bohlen, David M. Williams
    Abstract:

    Abstract Over the past seventy years, biomedical and epidemiological research has shown that regular physical activity (PA) is critical for physical and mental health. Despite this knowledge, physical inactivity is the fourth leading risk factor for global mortality, accounting for 9% (5.3 million) of premature deaths annually. We suggest this mismatch between knowing about the risks of PA and engaging in regular PA can be reconciled by focusing less on expected health benefits of PA and more on how people feel during PA. Specifically, in this position paper, we argue that Affective Response (feeling good versus bad) to PA is an intermediate phenotype that can explain significant variance in PA behavior and is, in turn, a function of genetic variability. In making this argument, we first review empirical evidence showing that Affective Response to PA predicts future physical activity behavior. Second, we systematically review research on single nucleotide morphisms (SNPs) that are associated with Affective Response to PA. Investigating Affective Response to PA as an intermediate phenotype will allow future researchers to move beyond asking “What SNPs are associated with PA?“, and begin asking “How do these SNPs influence PA?“, thus ultimately optimizing the translation of knowledge gained from genomic data to intervention development.

  • self paced exercise Affective Response and exercise adherence a preliminary investigation using ecological momentary assessment
    Journal of Sport & Exercise Psychology, 2016
    Co-Authors: David M. Williams, Shira Dunsiger, Jessica A. Emerson, Chad J Gwaltney, Peter M Monti, Robert Miranda
    Abstract:

    Affective Response to exercise may mediate the effects of self-paced exercise on exercise adherence. Fiftynine low-active (exercise <60 min/week), overweight (body mass index: 25.0-39.9) adults (ages 18-65) were randomly assigned to self-paced (but not to exceed 76% maximum heart rate) or prescribed moderate intensity exercise (64-76% maximum heart rate) in the context of otherwise identical 6-month print-based exercise promotion programs. Frequency and duration of exercise sessions and Affective Responses (good/bad) to exercise were assessed via ecological momentary assessment throughout the 6-month program. A regression-based mediation model was used to estimate (a) effects of experimental condition on Affective Response to exercise (path a = 0.20, SE = 0.28, f2 = 0.02); (b) effects of Affective Response on duration/latency of the next exercise session (path b = 0.47, SE = 0.25, f2 = 0.04); and (c) indirect effects of experimental condition on exercise outcomes via Affective Response (path ab = 0.11, SE = 0.06, f2 = 0.10). Results provide modest preliminary support for a mediational pathway linking self-paced exercise, Affective Response, and exercise adherence.

  • Affective and cognitive predictors of Affective Response to exercise: Examining unique and overlapping variance
    Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 2016
    Co-Authors: Margarita Sala, Austin S. Baldwin, David M. Williams
    Abstract:

    Abstract Objectives Affective Response to exercise has been suggested as an important factor in determining regular exercise. However, it is unclear the extent to which anticipatory affect factors (Affective attitudes, implicit associations, and Affective associations), anticipated affect factors (anticipated regret, anticipated pride), and cognitive factors (self-efficacy, intentions) explain overlapping or unique variance in Affective Response to exercise. Design We systematically examined the extent to which these various Affective and cognitive factors relevant to exercise predict Affective Response, and determined the extent to which these factors account for unique or overlapping variance in Affective Response. Method Healthy young adults (N = 69) completed measures of Affective attitudes, Affective associations, implicit associations, anticipated affect, self-efficacy, and exercise intentions. Participants then exercised for 20-min at moderate intensity on a treadmill, during and after which they reported their Affective Response. Using variables that were independent predictors, we conducted multivariate analyses to determine which factors account for unique variance in Affective Response to exercise. Results In three of four multivariate models, both anticipated and anticipatory affect variables explained unique variance in Affective Response during exercise. Only anticipatory affect variables accounted for unique variance in Affective Response immediately post-exercise. Finally, the association between exercise self-efficacy and Affective Response during-exercise was rendered non-significant after controlling for Affective factors in all three multivariate models. Conclusions The unique associations between Affective Response to exercise and Affective, but not cognitive, factors elucidate key predictors of Affective Response during- and post-exercise.

Angela D Bryan – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • in task and post task Affective Response to exercise translating exercise intentions into behaviour
    British Journal of Health Psychology, 2010
    Co-Authors: Bethany M Kwan, Angela D Bryan
    Abstract:

    Objectives To test whether Affective Response to an acute bout of exercise can predict regular voluntary exercise, and specifically whether a positive Affective Response helps translate intentions into behaviour. Design A prospective correlational design. Methods Participants (N=127) recruited from the community reported intentions to engage in voluntary exercise and frequency of participation in voluntary exercise both at baseline and at a 3-month follow-up. Self-reported positive affect, negative affect, tranquillity, and fatigue were assessed during a bout of moderate intensity exercise. Results Within subject slopes for increases in positive affect and decreases in fatigue during exercise, and increased tranquillity and decreased fatigue post-exercise were associated with more frequent participation in exercise at follow-up. Changes in negative affect did not predict exercise at follow-up; however, this was likely due to floor effects leading to lack of baseline variability in negative affect. Importantly, a positive Affective Response to exercise moderated the intention–behaviour relationship, such that those who responded to exercise more favourably exhibited stronger relationships between intentions and future exercise behaviour Conclusions We conclude that exercise-related increases in positive affect and tranquillity and decreases in feelings of fatigue can aid in the successful translation of exercise intentions into behaviour.

  • Affective Response to exercise as a component of exercise motivation attitudes norms self efficacy and temporal stability of intentions
    Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 2010
    Co-Authors: Bethany M Kwan, Angela D Bryan
    Abstract:

    Abstract Problem A positive Affective Response is associated with increased participation in voluntary exercise, but the mechanisms by which this occurs are not well known. Consistent with a Theory of Planned Behavior perspective, we tested whether Affective Response to exercise leads to greater motivation in terms of attitudes, subjective norms, self-efficacy and intentions to exercise. We were also specifically interested in whether a positive Affective Response leads to more temporally stable intentions. Method Participants ( N  = 127) self-reported Theory of Planned Behavior constructs and exercise behavior at baseline and three months later, and provided reports of exercise-related affect during a 30-minute bout of moderate intensity treadmill exercise at baseline. Results We show that participants who experience greater improvements in positive affect, negative affect and fatigue during exercise tended to report more positive attitudes, exercise self-efficacy and intentions to exercise three months later. Affective Response was not predictive of subjective norms. As hypothesized, positive Affective Response was associated with more stable intentions over time. Conclusions We conclude that a positive Affective Response to acute bouts of exercise can aid in building and sustaining exercise motivation over time.

Mark Bloch – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The psychological profile and Affective Response of women diagnosed with unexplained infertility undergoing in vitro fertilization
    Archives of Women's Mental Health, 2012
    Co-Authors: Gabi Aisenberg Romano, Hila Ravid, Inbar Zaig, Shaul Schreiber, Foad Azem, Izhak Shachar, Mark Bloch
    Abstract:

    It has been hypothesized that unexplained infertility may be related to specific personality and coping styles. We studied two groups of women with explained infertility (EIF, n = 63) and unexplained infertility (UIF, n = 42) undergoing an in vitro fertfertilization (IVF) cycle. Women completed personality and coping style questionnaires prior to the onset of the cycle, and state depression and anxiety scales before and at two additional time points during the cycle. Almost no in-between group differences were found at any of the measured time points in regards to the Minnesota Multiphasic Personality Inventory-2 validity and clinical scales, Illness Cognitions and Life Orientation Test, or for the situational measures. The few differences found suggest a more adaptive, better coping, and functioning defensive system in women with EIF. In conclusion, we did not find any clinically significant personality differences or differences in depression or anxiety levels between women with EIF and UIF during an IVF cycle. Minor differences found are probably a reaction to the ambiguous medical situation with its uncertain prognosis, amplifying certain traits which are not specific to one psychological structure but rather to the common experience shared by the group. The results of this study do not support the possibility that personality traits are involved in the pathophysiology of unexplained infertility.

Margaret Schneider – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • psychological need satisfaction intrinsic motivation and Affective Response to exercise in adolescents
    Psychology of Sport and Exercise, 2013
    Co-Authors: Margaret Schneider, Bethany M Kwan
    Abstract:

    ObjectivesTo further understanding of the factors influencing adolescents’ motivations for physical activity, the relationship of variables derived from Self-Determination Theory to adolescents’ Affective Response to exercise was examined.DesignCorrelational.MethodAdolescents (N = 182) self-reported psychological needs satisfaction (perceived competence, relatedness, and autonomy) and intrinsic motivation related to exercise. In two clinic visits, adolescents reported their affect before, during, and after a moderate-intensity and a hard-intensity exercise task.ResultsAffective Response to exercise and psychological needs satisfaction independently contributed to the prediction of intrinsic motivation in hierarchical linear regression models. The association between Affective Response to exercise and intrinsic motivation was partially mediated by psychological needs satisfaction.ConclusionsIntrinsic motivation for exercise among adolescents may be enhanced when the environment supports perceived competence, relatedness, and autonomy, and when adolescents participate in activities that they find enjoyable.