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After-Cataract

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Kohji Nishida – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

Sharon F Freedman – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • acquired central corneal thickness increase following removal of childhood cataracts
    American Journal of Ophthalmology, 2011
    Co-Authors: Kelly W Muir, Lois Duncan, Zena Lim, Sharon F Freedman
    Abstract:

    Purpose To evaluate central corneal thickness (CCT) in children with congenital/developmental cataracts before and after cataract removal, to correlate CCT with corneal diameters before cataract surgery in this same group, and to evaluate CCT over time in a separate group of children who were already aphakic or pseudophakic at study entry. Design Longitudinal study. Methods Children with cataract (Group 1, with pre-cataract-removal CCT) and aphakia/pseudophakia (Group 2, presenting after cataract removal) were included. CCT measurements were performed using ultrasound pachymetry. Normal fellow eyes of unilaterally affected cases served as controls. In bilateral cases, right eyes were used for analyses. Results Group 1 comprised 66 children. Before cataract surgery, unilateral cases (n = 31) showed similar CCT and strong association between the affected and fellow eyes (552.0 ± 32.9 μm vs 550.9 ± 40.4 μm, respectively; r 2 = 0.71, P = .0001). After cataract surgery, affected eyes (n = 13) showed mean CCT increase of 29.7 ± 43.1 μm ( P = .03) while fellow eyes remained unchanged. Similarly, before cataract surgery, bilateral cases (n = 35) showed similar CCT between the right and left eyes. After cataract surgery, mean CCT increase was 27.4 ± 39.4 μm for first operated eyes of bilateral cases (n = 17, P = .01). Group 2 comprised 50 aphakic/pseudophakic children lacking pre-cataract-removal CCT. CCT was higher in eyes with glaucoma vs those without, at both first and last measurements (ΔCCT 58.9 ± 27.0 μm at first examination, P = .034, and 56.4 ± 27.1 μm at last examination, P = .043, respectively). There was no statistically significant CCT change over the study interval (median 28 months) for either Group 2 eyes with or those without glaucoma. Conclusions CCT in children with cataracts increases after cataract surgery while the fellow eye remains stable. This increase seems to occur early after surgery, likely remaining stable thereafter, though glaucoma can accentuate the increase.

  • central corneal thickness congenital cataracts and aphakia
    American Journal of Ophthalmology, 2007
    Co-Authors: Kelly W Muir, Lois Duncan, Laura B Enyedi, David K Wallace, Sharon F Freedman
    Abstract:

    Purpose To evaluate central corneal thickness (CCT) in normal children (controls) and in those with cataracts, pseudophakia, and aphakia. Design Prospective, observational case series. Methods CCT was measured in 369 eyes of 223 children. Subjects with glaucoma, anterior segment abnormalities, or intraocular pressure of more than 30 mm Hg were excluded. Group means were compared for controls and for eyes with pediatric cataracts, pseudophakia, and aphakia. Results The mean CCT of eyes with cataracts was more than that of controls (574 ± 54 μm [n = 46] and 552 ± 38 μm [n = 230], respectively; P = .001). After excluding from the cataract group those eyes with aniridia, Down syndrome, Marfan syndrome, or glaucoma surgery, the mean CCT (564 ± 34 μm [n = 36]) was no longer greater than that of controls ( P = .07). The mean CCT of pseudophakic eyes (598 ± 56 μm [n = 29]) was greater than the mean CCT of controls ( P P = .06). The mean CCT of aphakic eyes (642 ± 88 μm [n = 64]) was greater than the mean CCT of controls ( P P P = .003). Conclusions In the absence of factors known to affect CCT (Down syndrome, Marfan syndrome, and aniridia), CCT is similar in eyes with pediatric cataracts and normal controls and increases after cataract surgery.

Takeshi Soma – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Outcomes of photorefractive keratectomy instead of phototherapeutic keratectomy for patients with granular corneal dystrophy type 2
    Graefe's Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Fumika Oya, Takeshi Soma, Takeshi Nakao, Motokazu Tsujikawa, Naoyuki Maeda, Yoshinori Oie, Shizuka Koh, Kohji Nishida
    Abstract:

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate visual function and postoperative refractive errors in patients with granular corneal dystrophy type 2 (GCD2) and cataracts who underwent photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) instead of phototherapeutic keratectomy (PTK) following cataract surgery to avoid PTK-induced central island formation and reduce refractive errors after cataract surgery. Methods The medical records of 14 eyes from nine patients (one man and eight women; mean age, 69.0 ± 8.5 years) with GCD2 and cataracts were evaluated. All patients underwent PTK using the PRK mode 3 months after cataract surgery. We analyzed corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), refractive errors, and corneal astigmatism derived from Fourier analysis and assessed the incidence of complications in cataract surgery and PTK. Results The mean CDVA logMAR values were 0.42 ± 0.19, 0.38 ± 0.18, and 0.16 ± 0.12 before and after cataract surgery and after PTK, respectively. CDVA improved significantly after PTK, as compared with both before and after cataract surgery ( P  

  • outcomes of photorefractive keratectomy instead of phototherapeutic keratectomy for patients with granular corneal dystrophy type 2
    Graefes Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Takeshi Soma, Takeshi Nakao, Motokazu Tsujikawa, Naoyuki Maeda, Kohji Nishida
    Abstract:

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate visual function and postoperative refractive errors in patients with granular corneal dystrophy type 2 (GCD2) and cataracts who underwent photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) instead of phototherapeutic keratectomy (PTK) following cataract surgery to avoid PTK-induced central island formation and reduce refractive errors after cataract surgery.

Ecosse L Lamoureux – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • the impact of cataract cataract types and cataract grades on vision specific functioning using rasch analysis
    American Journal of Ophthalmology, 2012
    Co-Authors: Merwyn Chew, Peggy Peichia Chiang, Yingfeng Zheng, Raghavan Lavanya, Seangmei Saw, Tien Yin Wong, Ecosse L Lamoureux
    Abstract:

    Purpose To determine the impact of cataracts and their types and grades on vision-specific functioning. Design Prospective population-based cross-sectional study. Methods The Singapore Indian Eye Study examined 3400 of 4497 (75.6% response rate) ethnic Indians 40 years of age and older living in Singapore. Three thousand one hundred sixty-eight (93.2%) fulfilled inclusion criteria with complete information for final analysis. Cataracts were assessed on slit-lamp examination and were graded according to the Lens Opacity Classification System III. Vision-specific functioning scores were explored with the Visual Function scale, validated using Rasch analysis. Results Two hundred sixty-nine (8.5%) and 740 (23.4%) of the study participants had unilateral and bilateral cataracts, respectively, and 329 (10.4%), 800 (25.2%), and 128 (4.1%) participants had nuclear, cortical, and posterior subcapsular (PSC) cataracts, respectively. In multivariate linear regression models, the presence of bilateral rather than unilateral cataract (β = −0.12; 95% confidence interval, −0.20 to 0.00) was associated independently with poorer vision-specific functioning, even after adjusting for undercorrected refractive error (β = −0.11; 95% confidence interval, −0.21 to 0.00). Bilateral nuclear, cortical, and PSC cataracts also were associated with poorer vision-specific functioning (β = −0.31, −0.15, and −1.15, respectively), with combinations of them having even greater impact. Significantly poorer vision-specific functioning occurred at Lens Opacity Classification System grades 4 (nuclear opalescence), 5 (nuclear color), 3 (cortical), and 1 (PSC) or higher. Conclusions People with bilateral but not unilateral cataracts experience difficulty with performing vision-specific daily activities independent of refractive error, with PSC cataracts and cataract combinations having the greatest impact. Cataract types cause poorer vision-specific functioning beginning at different severity grades.

  • the impact of bilateral or unilateral cataract surgery on visual functioning when does second eye cataract surgery benefit patients
    British Journal of Ophthalmology, 2012
    Co-Authors: Anna C S Tan, Yingfeng Zheng, Tien Yin Wong, Wan Ting Tay, Ava Grace Tan, Jie Jin Wang, Paul Mitchell, Ecosse L Lamoureux
    Abstract:

    Aim To examine the impact of bilateral or unilateral cataract surgery on visual functioning. Methods The Singapore Malay Eye Study is a population-based study of 3280 Singapore Malay patients aged 40–80 years, of which 3225 had data available for inclusion. Cataracts were graded from digital lens photographs according to the Wisconsin scale. Study subjects were categorised as having: bilateral cataract surgery performed; unilateral cataract surgery performed with minimal cataract in the fellow eye; unilateral cataract surgery performed with significant cataract in the fellow eye; and bilateral cataract. Visual functioning was assessed using the modified VF-9 scale culturally adapted for Singaporean individuals, validated by Rasch analysis. The overall Rasch-modified vision-specific functioning score was compared across the four groups after adjusting for confounders such as age, gender, ocular and systemic comorbidities. Results Persons with bilateral cataract had poorer visual functioning than those who had bilateral cataract surgery (mean visual functioning scores 3.38 vs 3.11, respectively, p=0.029). When compared with bilateral surgery, visual functioning improvements among patients with unilateral cataract surgery depended on the status of the fellow eye, with improvements only seen if the fellow eye had significant cataract (mean visual functioning scores 2.81 vs 3.25, p=0.019) or poor visual acuity (mean visual functioning scores 2.78 vs 3.25, p=0.018) after adjusting for confounders. Conclusions Bilateral cataract surgery was associated with greater visual functioning over unilateral cataract surgery when the fellow eye had a significant cataract or poor presenting visual acuity, supporting the current practice of second eye surgery depending on the fellow eye9s cataract status and visual acuity.

Naoyuki Maeda – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Outcomes of photorefractive keratectomy instead of phototherapeutic keratectomy for patients with granular corneal dystrophy type 2
    Graefe's Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Fumika Oya, Takeshi Soma, Takeshi Nakao, Motokazu Tsujikawa, Naoyuki Maeda, Yoshinori Oie, Shizuka Koh, Kohji Nishida
    Abstract:

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate visual function and postoperative refractive errors in patients with granular corneal dystrophy type 2 (GCD2) and cataracts who underwent photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) instead of phototherapeutic keratectomy (PTK) following cataract surgery to avoid PTK-induced central island formation and reduce refractive errors after cataract surgery. Methods The medical records of 14 eyes from nine patients (one man and eight women; mean age, 69.0 ± 8.5 years) with GCD2 and cataracts were evaluated. All patients underwent PTK using the PRK mode 3 months after cataract surgery. We analyzed corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), refractive errors, and corneal astigmatism derived from Fourier analysis and assessed the incidence of complications in cataract surgery and PTK. Results The mean CDVA logMAR values were 0.42 ± 0.19, 0.38 ± 0.18, and 0.16 ± 0.12 before and after cataract surgery and after PTK, respectively. CDVA improved significantly after PTK, as compared with both before and after cataract surgery ( P  

  • outcomes of photorefractive keratectomy instead of phototherapeutic keratectomy for patients with granular corneal dystrophy type 2
    Graefes Archive for Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Takeshi Soma, Takeshi Nakao, Motokazu Tsujikawa, Naoyuki Maeda, Kohji Nishida
    Abstract:

    Purpose The purpose of this study was to evaluate visual function and postoperative refractive errors in patients with granular corneal dystrophy type 2 (GCD2) and cataracts who underwent photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) instead of phototherapeutic keratectomy (PTK) following cataract surgery to avoid PTK-induced central island formation and reduce refractive errors after cataract surgery.