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Age-Related Macular Degeneration

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Emily Y Chew – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Age-Related Macular Degeneration.
    Lancet (London England), 2008
    Co-Authors: Hanna R Coleman, Chi-chao Chan, Frederick L Ferris, Emily Y Chew
    Abstract:

    Age-Related Macular Degeneration is the leading cause of blindness in elderly populations of European descent. The most consistent risk factors associated with this ocular condition are increasing age and cigarette smoking. Genetic investigations have shown that complement factfactor H, a regulator of the alternative complement pathway, and LOC387715/HtrA1 are the most consistent genetic riskrisk factors for Age-Related Macular Degeneration. Although the pathogenesis of this disease is unknown, oxidative stress might have an important role. Treatment with antioxidant vitamins and zinc can reduce the risk of developing advanced Age-Related Macular Degeneration by about a quarter in those at least at moderate risk. Intravitreal injections of ranibizumab, a monoclonal antiantibody that inhibits all forms of vascular endothelial growth factor, have been shown to stabilise loss of vision and, in some cases, improve vision in individuals with neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration. These findings, combined with assessments of possible environmental and genetic interactions and new approaches to modulate inflammatory pathways, will hopefully further expand our ability to understand and treat Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

  • Age-Related Macular Degeneration. Commentary
    The Lancet, 2008
    Co-Authors: Caroline C W Klaver, Hanna R Coleman, Chi-chao Chan, Frederick L Ferris, Arthur A.b. Bergen, Emily Y Chew
    Abstract:

    Age-Related Macular Degeneration is the leading cause of blindness in elderly populations of European descent. The most consistent risk factors associated with this ocular condition are increasing age and cigarette smoking. Genetic investigations have shown that complement factfactor H, a regulator of the alternative complement pathway, and LOC387715/HtrA1 are the most consistent genetic riskrisk factors for Age-Related Macular Degeneration. Although the pathogenesis of this disease is unknown, oxidative stress might have an important role. Treatment with antioxidant vitamins and zinc can reduce the risk of developing advanced Age-Related Macular Degeneration by about a quarter in those at least at moderate risk. Intravitreal injections ofranibizumab, a monoclonal antiantibody that inhibits all forms of vascular endothelial growth factor, have been shown to stabilise loss of vision and, in some cases, improve vision in individuals with neovascular Age-Related Macular Degeneration. These findings, combined with assessments of possible environmental and genetic interactions and new approaches to modulate inflammatory pathways, will hopefully further expand our ability to understand and treat Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

  • Nutritional supplementation in Age-Related Macular Degeneration.
    Current opinion in ophthalmology, 2007
    Co-Authors: Hanna R Coleman, Emily Y Chew
    Abstract:

    Purpose of review This review assesses the current status of the knowledge of the role of nutrition in Age-Related Macular Degeneration – a leading cause of vision loss in the persons with European ancestry. Recent findings We will evaluate the different nutritional factors and both observational and interventional studies used to assess the association of nutrition with Age-Related Macular Degeneration. Persons with intermediate risk of Age-Related Macular Degeneration or advanced Age-Related Macular Degeneration in one eye are recommended to take the formulation proven in the Age-Related Eye Disease Study (AREDS) to be successful in preventing the development of advanced Age-Related Macular Degeneration by 25%. The formulation consists of vitamins C, E, beta-carocarotene and zinc. In addition, observational data suggest that high dietary intake of Macular xanthophylls lutein and zeaxanthin are associated with a lower risk of advanced Age-Related Macular Degeneration. Similarly, long-chain polyunsaturated fattfatty acids derived from fish consumption are also associated with a decreased risk of advanced Age-Related Macular Degeneration. Summary Persons with intermediate Age-Related Macular Degeneration or advanced Age-Related Macular Degeneration (neovascular or central geographic atrophy) in one eye should consider taking the AREDS-type supplements. Further evaluation of nutritional factors, specifically, lutein/zeaxanthin and omega-3 fatty acids will be tested in a multicenter controlled, randomized trial – the Age-Related Eye Disease Study 2 (AREDS2).

Miyoung Suh – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • associations between lutein zeaxanthin and age related Macular Degeneration an overview
    Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, 2009
    Co-Authors: Shannon Carpentier, Maria Knaus, Miyoung Suh
    Abstract:

    Age-Related Macular Degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in the elderly, is a degenerative condition of the macula characterized by death or dysfunction of the photoreceptors. With the aging population growing, the incidence of Age-Related Macular Degeneration is expected to increase. This raises concern about the future of visual dysfunction related falls and the resulting injuries in the elderly population. Lutein and zeaxanthin are Macular pigments that may play a role in reducing the development and progression of Age-Related Macular Degeneration. Evidence is accumulating on the consumption of lutein and zeaxanthin (in whole food or supplemental form), the resulting concentrations in the serum, and tissue distribution throughout the body, particularly in the retina. Lutein and zeaxanthin intake increases serum concentrations which in turn increases Macular pigment density. Existing literature focuses on factors affecting Macular pigment density, functions of lutein and zeaxanthin as blue-light filters and antioxidants, and risk factors associated with Age-Related Macular Degeneration. Few studies have focused on the impact of dietary lutein and zeaxanthin on retinal function and the potential to preserve vision and prevent further Degeneration. This presents an opportunity for further research to determine an effective dose that delays the progression of Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

Froncie A. Gutman – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • A Twin Study of Age-Related Macular Degeneration
    American journal of ophthalmology, 1995
    Co-Authors: Sanford M. Meyers, Tom Greene, Froncie A. Gutman
    Abstract:

    Purpose To determine the importance of genetic factors in Age-Related Macular Degeneration by using a twin study to compare the concordance of Age-Related Macular Degeneration in monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs. Methods We prospectively examined 134 consecutive twin pairs and two triplet sets for Age-Related Macular Degeneration. The zygosity was determined by genetic laboratory tests. Results The concordance of Age-Related Macular Degeneration was 100% (25 of 25) in monozygotic and 42% (five of 12) in dizygotic twin pairs. The other twins or triplets had no Macular changes of Age-Related Macular Degeneration. Conclusions The statistically significant higher concordance of Age-Related Macular Degeneration in monozygotic than in dizygotic twin pairs and the clinical heterogeneity of Age-Related Macular Degeneration strongly suggest the importance of genetic and nongenetic factors, respectively, in Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

Christopher Martyn – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Lutein and zeaxanthin status and risk of Age-Related Macular Degeneration.
    Investigative ophthalmology & visual science, 2003
    Co-Authors: Catharine R. Gale, Nigel F Hall, David I.w. Phillips, Christopher Martyn
    Abstract:

    PURPOSE. To investigate the relation between plasma concentrations of lutein and zeaxanthin and Age-Related Macular Degeneration in a group of elderly men and women. METHODS. The Wisconsin Age-Related Maculopathy Grading System was used to grade features of early and late Macular Degeneration in 380 men and women, aged 66 to 75 years, from Sheffield, United Kingdom. Fasting blood samples were taken to assess plasma concentrations of lutein and zeaxanthin. RESULTS. Risk of Age-Related Macular Degeneration (early or late) was significantly higher in people with lower plasma concentrations of zeaxanthin. Compared with those whose plasma concentrations of zeaxanthin were in the highest third of the distribution, people whose plasma concentration was in the lowest third had an odds ratio for risk of Age-Related Macular Degeneration of 2.0 (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.0–4.1), after adjustment for age and other risk factors. Risk of Age-Related Macular Degeneration was increased in people with the lowest plasma concentrations of lutein plus zeaxanthin (odds ratio [OR] 1.9, 95% CI 0.9–3.5) and in those with the lowest concentrations of lutein (OR 1.7, 95% CI 0.9–3.3), but neither of these relations was statistically significant. CONCLUSIONS. These findings provide support for the view that zeaxanthin may protect against Age-Related Macular Degeneration.

Shannon Carpentier – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • associations between lutein zeaxanthin and age related Macular Degeneration an overview
    Critical Reviews in Food Science and Nutrition, 2009
    Co-Authors: Shannon Carpentier, Maria Knaus, Miyoung Suh
    Abstract:

    Age-Related Macular Degeneration, the leading cause of blindness in the elderly, is a degenerative condition of the macula characterized by death or dysfunction of the photoreceptors. With the aging population growing, the incidence of Age-Related Macular Degeneration is expected to increase. This raises concern about the future of visual dysfunction related falls and the resulting injuries in the elderly population. Lutein and zeaxanthin are Macular pigments that may play a role in reducing the development and progression of Age-Related Macular Degeneration. Evidence is accumulating on the consumption of lutein and zeaxanthin (in whole food or supplemental form), the resulting concentrations in the serum, and tissue distribution throughout the body, particularly in the retina. Lutein and zeaxanthin intake increases serum concentrations which in turn increases Macular pigment density. Existing literature focuses on factors affecting Macular pigment density, functions of lutein and zeaxanthin as blue-light filters and antioxidants, and risk factors associated with Age-Related Macular Degeneration. Few studies have focused on the impact of dietary lutein and zeaxanthin on retinal function and the potential to preserve vision and prevent further Degeneration. This presents an opportunity for further research to determine an effective dose that delays the progression of Age-Related Macular Degeneration.