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Agenda 21

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Jinwu Pang – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Implementing China’s “Water Agenda 21
    Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, 2006
    Co-Authors: Xiaoliu Yang, Jinwu Pang

    Abstract:

    China’s per capita available water is only 2220 m3, about a quarter of the world average. As a result, China faces an imbalance between the supply and demand of water for agricultural and general population use. Poor water resource development, wasteful usage, and water pollution are all exacerbating the problem. Water-related issues have seriously hampered economic development in China, especially in recent decades, while the country has undergone rapid economic growth. Implementing a sustainable water resource strategy is therefore vital. To meet the goals of national economic reconstruction and development, and to solve the water shortage problem, China’s “Water Agenda 21” was formulated in 1998. This paper focuses on the implementation of this strategy and discusses China’s approach to solving its water-shortage problems in order to safeguard sustainable socioeconomic development.

  • implementing china s water Agenda 21
    Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, 2006
    Co-Authors: Xiaoliu Yang, Jinwu Pang

    Abstract:

    China’s per capita available water is only 2220 m3, about a quarter of the world average. As a result, China faces an imbalance between the supply and demand of water for agricultural and general population use. Poor water resource development, wasteful usage, and water pollution are all exacerbating the problem. Water-related issues have seriously hampered economic development in China, especially in recent decades, while the country has undergone rapid economic growth. Implementing a sustainable water resource strategy is therefore vital. To meet the goals of national economic reconstruction and development, and to solve the water shortage problem, China’s “Water Agenda 21” was formulated in 1998. This paper focuses on the implementation of this strategy and discusses China’s approach to solving its water-shortage problems in order to safeguard sustainable socioeconomic development.

Carlo Aall – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Municipal Environmental Policy in Norway: From ‘mainstream’ policy to ‘real’ Agenda 21?
    Local Environment, 2000
    Co-Authors: Carlo Aall

    Abstract:

    The Brundtland report and Agenda 21 focus on the global environment and development problems. Though Norway is usually considered a pioneer with respect to sustainable development, analyses have shown that this has not been the case with respect to Local Agenda 21. Still, Norwegian municipalities have strengthened their institutional capacity on environmental policy, and have thereby strengthened their ability to follow up the recommendations in Agenda 21. Through the high-profile government-financed reform programme, Environment in the Municipalities, which ran from 1988 to 1996, a great majority of the municipalities have employed their own environmental officers, and environmental considerations have gradually obtained a footing in municipal planning. So far, however, it is the local environmental problems that have received most attention rather than global environmental and development problems. By the start of the 21st century a crucial question is, therefore, whether the growing number of Local Age…

  • municipal environmental policy in norway from mainstream policy to real Agenda 21
    Local Environment, 2000
    Co-Authors: Carlo Aall

    Abstract:

    The Brundtland report and Agenda 21 focus on the global environment and development problems. Though Norway is usually considered a pioneer with respect to sustainable development, analyses have shown that this has not been the case with respect to Local Agenda 21. Still, Norwegian municipalities have strengthened their institutional capacity on environmental policy, and have thereby strengthened their ability to follow up the recommendations in Agenda 21. Through the high-profile government-financed reform programme, Environment in the Municipalities, which ran from 1988 to 1996, a great majority of the municipalities have employed their own environmental officers, and environmental considerations have gradually obtained a footing in municipal planning. So far, however, it is the local environmental problems that have received most attention rather than global environmental and development problems. By the start of the 21st century a crucial question is, therefore, whether the growing number of Local Age…

Xiaoliu Yang – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Implementing China’s “Water Agenda 21
    Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, 2006
    Co-Authors: Xiaoliu Yang, Jinwu Pang

    Abstract:

    China’s per capita available water is only 2220 m3, about a quarter of the world average. As a result, China faces an imbalance between the supply and demand of water for agricultural and general population use. Poor water resource development, wasteful usage, and water pollution are all exacerbating the problem. Water-related issues have seriously hampered economic development in China, especially in recent decades, while the country has undergone rapid economic growth. Implementing a sustainable water resource strategy is therefore vital. To meet the goals of national economic reconstruction and development, and to solve the water shortage problem, China’s “Water Agenda 21” was formulated in 1998. This paper focuses on the implementation of this strategy and discusses China’s approach to solving its water-shortage problems in order to safeguard sustainable socioeconomic development.

  • implementing china s water Agenda 21
    Frontiers in Ecology and the Environment, 2006
    Co-Authors: Xiaoliu Yang, Jinwu Pang

    Abstract:

    China’s per capita available water is only 2220 m3, about a quarter of the world average. As a result, China faces an imbalance between the supply and demand of water for agricultural and general population use. Poor water resource development, wasteful usage, and water pollution are all exacerbating the problem. Water-related issues have seriously hampered economic development in China, especially in recent decades, while the country has undergone rapid economic growth. Implementing a sustainable water resource strategy is therefore vital. To meet the goals of national economic reconstruction and development, and to solve the water shortage problem, China’s “Water Agenda 21” was formulated in 1998. This paper focuses on the implementation of this strategy and discusses China’s approach to solving its water-shortage problems in order to safeguard sustainable socioeconomic development.