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Ellen T. Chang – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • a critical review of the epidemiology of Agent Orange tcdd and prostate cancer
    European Journal of Epidemiology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Ellen T. Chang, Paolo Boffetta, Hans-olov Adami, Philip A Cole, John S. Mandel

    Abstract:

    To inform risk assessment and regulatory deci- sion-making, the relationship between 2,3,7,8-tetrachlo- rodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and prostate cancer requires clarification. This article systematically and critically reviews the epidemiologic evidence on the association between expo- sure to TCDD or Agent Orange, a TCDD-contaminated her- bicide used during the Vietnam War, and prostate cancer risk. Articles evaluated include 11 studies of three cohorts, four case-control or cross-sectional studies, and three case-only studies of military veterans with information on estimated Agent Orange or TCDD exposure; 13 studies of seven cohorts, one case-control study, and eight proportionate morbidity or mortality studies of Vietnam veterans without information on Agent Orange exposure; 11 cohort studies of workers with occupational exposure to TCDD; and two studies of one community cohort with environmental exposure to TCDD. The most informative studies, including those of Vietnam veterans involved in Agent Orange spraying or other handling, herbicide manufacturing or spraying workers with occupa- tional TCDD exposure, and community members exposed to TCDD through an industrial accident, consistently reported no significant increase in prostate cancer incidence or mortality. Only some potentially confounded studies of Vietnam veterans compared with the general population, studies with unreliable estimates of Agent Orange exposure, and analyses of selected subgroups of Vietnam veterans reported positive associations. Overall, epidemiologic research offers no consistent or con- vincing evidence of a causal relationship between exposure to Agent Orange or TCDD and prostate cancer. More accurate exposure assessment is needed in large epidemiologic studies to rule out a causal association more conclusively.

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  • A critical review of the epidemiology of Agent Orange/TCDD and prostate cancer
    European Journal of Epidemiology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Ellen T. Chang, Paolo Boffetta, Hans-olov Adami, Philip Cole, John S. Mandel

    Abstract:

    To inform risk assessment and regulatory decision-making, the relationship between 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and prostate cancer requires clarification. This article systematically and critically reviews the epidemiologic evidence on the association between exposure to TCDD or Agent Orange, a TCDD-contaminated herbicide used during the Vietnam War, and prostate cancer risk. Articles evaluated include 11 studies of three cohorts, four case-control or cross-sectional studies, and three case-only studies of military veterans with information on estimated Agent Orange or TCDD exposure; 13 studies of seven cohorts, one case-control study, and eight proportionate morbidity or mortality studies of Vietnam veterans without information on Agent Orange exposure; 11 cohort studies of workers with occupational exposure to TCDD; and two studies of one community cohort with environmental exposure to TCDD. The most informative studies, including those of Vietnam veterans involved in Agent Orange spraying or other handling, herbicide manufacturing or spraying workers with occupational TCDD exposure, and community members exposed to TCDD through an industrial accident, consistently reported no significant increase in prostate cancer incidence or mortality. Only some potentially confounded studies of Vietnam veterans compared with the general population, studies with unreliable estimates of Agent Orange exposure, and analyses of selected subgroups of Vietnam veterans reported positive associations. Overall, epidemiologic research offers no consistent or convincing evidence of a causal relationship between exposure to Agent Orange or TCDD and prostate cancer. More accurate exposure assessment is needed in large epidemiologic studies to rule out a causal association more conclusively.

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John S. Mandel – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • a critical review of the epidemiology of Agent Orange tcdd and prostate cancer
    European Journal of Epidemiology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Ellen T. Chang, Paolo Boffetta, Hans-olov Adami, Philip A Cole, John S. Mandel

    Abstract:

    To inform risk assessment and regulatory deci- sion-making, the relationship between 2,3,7,8-tetrachlo- rodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and prostate cancer requires clarification. This article systematically and critically reviews the epidemiologic evidence on the association between expo- sure to TCDD or Agent Orange, a TCDD-contaminated her- bicide used during the Vietnam War, and prostate cancer risk. Articles evaluated include 11 studies of three cohorts, four case-control or cross-sectional studies, and three case-only studies of military veterans with information on estimated Agent Orange or TCDD exposure; 13 studies of seven cohorts, one case-control study, and eight proportionate morbidity or mortality studies of Vietnam veterans without information on Agent Orange exposure; 11 cohort studies of workers with occupational exposure to TCDD; and two studies of one community cohort with environmental exposure to TCDD. The most informative studies, including those of Vietnam veterans involved in Agent Orange spraying or other handling, herbicide manufacturing or spraying workers with occupa- tional TCDD exposure, and community members exposed to TCDD through an industrial accident, consistently reported no significant increase in prostate cancer incidence or mortality. Only some potentially confounded studies of Vietnam veterans compared with the general population, studies with unreliable estimates of Agent Orange exposure, and analyses of selected subgroups of Vietnam veterans reported positive associations. Overall, epidemiologic research offers no consistent or con- vincing evidence of a causal relationship between exposure to Agent Orange or TCDD and prostate cancer. More accurate exposure assessment is needed in large epidemiologic studies to rule out a causal association more conclusively.

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  • A critical review of the epidemiology of Agent Orange/TCDD and prostate cancer
    European Journal of Epidemiology, 2014
    Co-Authors: Ellen T. Chang, Paolo Boffetta, Hans-olov Adami, Philip Cole, John S. Mandel

    Abstract:

    To inform risk assessment and regulatory decision-making, the relationship between 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) and prostate cancer requires clarification. This article systematically and critically reviews the epidemiologic evidence on the association between exposure to TCDD or Agent Orange, a TCDD-contaminated herbicide used during the Vietnam War, and prostate cancer risk. Articles evaluated include 11 studies of three cohorts, four case-control or cross-sectional studies, and three case-only studies of military veterans with information on estimated Agent Orange or TCDD exposure; 13 studies of seven cohorts, one case-control study, and eight proportionate morbidity or mortality studies of Vietnam veterans without information on Agent Orange exposure; 11 cohort studies of workers with occupational exposure to TCDD; and two studies of one community cohort with environmental exposure to TCDD. The most informative studies, including those of Vietnam veterans involved in Agent Orange spraying or other handling, herbicide manufacturing or spraying workers with occupational TCDD exposure, and community members exposed to TCDD through an industrial accident, consistently reported no significant increase in prostate cancer incidence or mortality. Only some potentially confounded studies of Vietnam veterans compared with the general population, studies with unreliable estimates of Agent Orange exposure, and analyses of selected subgroups of Vietnam veterans reported positive associations. Overall, epidemiologic research offers no consistent or convincing evidence of a causal relationship between exposure to Agent Orange or TCDD and prostate cancer. More accurate exposure assessment is needed in large epidemiologic studies to rule out a causal association more conclusively.

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Edward Adamovich – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Prostate cancer control and survival in Vietnam veterans exposed to Agent Orange.
    Brachytherapy, 2009
    Co-Authors: Lydia Everly, Gregory S. Merrick, Zachariah A. Allen, Wayne M. Butler, Kent E. Wallner, Jonathan H. Lief, Robert W. Galbreath, Edward Adamovich

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND: In this study, we evaluated the impact of Agent Orange exposure on survival in Vietnam Veterans undergoing prostate brachytherapy. METHODS AND MATERIAL: From May 1995 to January 2005, 81 Vietnam veterans (29 with Agent Orange exposure and 52 without) and 433 nonveterans of comparable age (mean age, 58 years) underwent prostate brachytherapy. The mean follow-up was 5.0 years. Biochemical progres- sion-free survival (bPFS) was defined as a prostate-specific antigen (PSA)

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  • prostate cancer control and survival in vietnam veterans exposed to Agent Orange
    Brachytherapy, 2008
    Co-Authors: Lydia Everly, Gregory S. Merrick, Zachariah A. Allen, Wayne M. Butler, Kent E. Wallner, Jonathan H. Lief, Robert W. Galbreath, Edward Adamovich

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND: In this study, we evaluated the impact of Agent Orange exposure on survival in Vietnam Veterans undergoing prostate brachytherapy. METHODS AND MATERIAL: From May 1995 to January 2005, 81 Vietnam veterans (29 with Agent Orange exposure and 52 without) and 433 nonveterans of comparable age (mean age, 58 years) underwent prostate brachytherapy. The mean follow-up was 5.0 years. Biochemical progres- sion-free survival (bPFS) was defined as a prostate-specific antigen (PSA) <0.40 ng/mL after nadir. Patients with metastatic prostate cancer or hormone refractory disease without obvious metastases who died of any cause were classified as died of prostate cancer. All other deaths were attributed to the immediate cause of death. Multiple parameters were evaluated for impact on survival. RESULTS: At 9 years, Agent Orangeeexposed men were least likely to remain biochemically controlled (89.5%, 100%, and 97.2% in Agent Orangeeexposed, nonexposed veterans, and nonvet- erans, respectively, p 50.012). No significant differences in cause-specific (CSS) (p 50.832) or overall survival (OS) (p 50.363) were discerned. In multivariate analysis, CSS was best predicted by Gleason Score and day 0 D90, whereas Gleason Score, % positive biopsies, and D90 predicted for bPFS. None of the evaluated parameters predicted for OS, however, a trend was identified for better OS in younger patients and those with a higher D90. In addition, Agent Orange exposure did not predict for any of the survival parameters. To date, 22 patients have died (metastatic prostate cancer two, second malignancies nine, cardiovascular disease eight, trauma two, and pulmonary one). CONCLUSIONS: In this cohort of prostate brachytherapy patients, Agent Orange exposure did not statistically impact survival in multivariate analysis. 2009 Published by Elsevier Inc on behalf of American Brachytherapy Society.

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