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Ageratina adenophora

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Fanghao Wan – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Ageratina adenophora invasions are associated with microbially mediated differences in biogeochemical cycles
    Science of The Total Environment, 2019
    Co-Authors: Mengxin Zhao, Wanxue Liu, Jianying Guo, Jizhong Zhou, Haixia Zhao, Yunfeng Yang, Lauren Hale, Qun Gao, Fanghao Wan

    Abstract:

    Invasive plant species may alter soil nutrient availability to facilitate their growth and competitiveness. However, the roles and functional mechanisms of plant-associated microbes that mediate these soil biogeochemical cycles remain elusive. Here, we studied how soil microorganisms and their functional processes differed between soils invaded by Ageratina adenophora and adjacent non-invaded soils in a region of China with heavy invasion. Our results indicated that soil nitrogen contents were over 4.32 mg/kg higher (p < 0.05) in both rhizosphere soils and bulk soils dominated by A. adenophora as compared with those in soils dominated by non-invaded plants. Concurrently, soil microbial-mediated functional processes, i.e. nitrogen fixation rate, nitrification rate and ammonification rate, were also significantly (p < 0.05) higher in either rhizosphere soils or bulk soils of invasive A. adenophora. Using a functional gene microarray, we found higher relative abundances of soil microbial genes involved in N cycling processes in A. adenophora soils, e.g. nifH, required for nitrogen fixation, which significantly correlated with ammonia contents (r = 0.35 in bulk soils, r = 0.37 in rhizosphere soils, p < 0.05) and the nitrogen fixation rate (r = 0.44, p < 0.05). We also found that the relative abundances of labile carbon decomposition genes were higher in invasive A. adenophora soils, implying a potential higher availability of carbon. These results suggest that the soil surrounding the invasive plant A. adenophora is a self-reinforcing environment. The plant litter and rhizosphere environment of the invasive may influence soil microbial communities, promoting self-supporting soil processes. Alternatively, the regions invaded by A. adenophora may have already had properties that facilitated these beneficial microbial community traits, allowing easier invasion by the exotics. Both scenarios offer important insights for the mitigation of plant invasion and provide an ecosystem-level understanding of the invasive mechanisms utilized by alien plants.

  • Crofton Weed Ageratina adenophora (Sprengel)
    Biological Invasions and Its Management in China, 2017
    Co-Authors: Guoqing Yang, Furong Gui, Wanxue Liu, Fanghao Wan

    Abstract:

    The crofton weed, Ageratina adenophora (Sprengel), a plant native to central Mexico and Costa Rica, has invaded more than 30 countries and regions of tropical and subtropical zones. In the 1940s, it was introduced from Myanmar into the south Lincang (e.g. Cangyuan and Gengma) of Yunnan Province, China. Subsequently, this weed has widely spread throughout Southwestern China including Yunnan, Guizhou, Sichuan, Guangxi, Xizang Provinces and Chongqing, with an ongoing spread eastward and northward at a speed of 20 km per year. The crofton weed has caused serious economic losses to agriculture, forestry and livestock, and severely damaged the ecology and environment of China’s native habitats, e.g. exposure to or consumption of this weed makes livestock sick. In addition, the crofton weed can establish monocultures in places where diverse native communities once flourished. Potential invasive mechanisms of this weed have been investigated in China, e.g. biological characteristics responsible for its rapid spread, allelopathy on native plants, and effects on soil nutrition and biota. Moreover, we summarize and discuss possible control methods for the crofton weed in this chapter, including chemical control, biological control, replacement control, and comprehensive utilizing.

  • Complete chloroplast genome sequence of a major invasive species, crofton weed (Ageratina adenophora
    , 2016
    Co-Authors: Xiaojun Nie, Yingxin Zhang, Le Wang, Siddanagouda S. Biradar, Xiufang Tan, Fanghao Wan, Song Weining

    Abstract:

    Background: Crofton weed (Ageratina adenophora) is one of the most hazardous invasive plant species, which causes serious economic losses and environmental damages worldwide. However, the sequence resource and genome information of A. adenophora are rather limited, making phylogenetic identification and evolutionary studies very difficult. Here, we report the complete sequence of the A. adenophora chloroplast (cp) genome based on Illumina sequencing. Methodology/Principal Findings: The A. adenophora cp genome is 150, 689 bp in length including a small single-copy (SSC) region of 18, 358 bp and a large single-copy (LSC) region of 84, 815 bp separated by a pair of inverted repeats (IRs) of 23, 755 bp. The genome contains 130 unique genes and 18 duplicated in the IR regions, with the gene content and organization similar to other Asteraceae cp genomes. Comparative analysis identified five DNA regions (ndhD-ccsA, psbI-trnS, ndhF-ycf1, ndhI-ndhG and atpA-trnR) containing parsimony-informative characters higher than 2%, which may be potential informative markers for barcoding and phylogenetic analysis. Repeat structure, codon usage and contraction of the IR were also investigated to reveal the pattern of evolution. Phylogenetic analysis demonstrated a sister relationship between A. adenophora and Guizotia abyssinica and supported a monophyly of the Asterales. Conclusion: We have assembled and analyzed the chloroplast genome of A. adenophora in this study, which was the first sequenced plastome in the Eupatorieae tribe. The complete chloroplast genome information is useful for plan

Wanxue Liu – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Ageratina adenophora invasions are associated with microbially mediated differences in biogeochemical cycles
    Science of The Total Environment, 2019
    Co-Authors: Mengxin Zhao, Wanxue Liu, Jianying Guo, Jizhong Zhou, Haixia Zhao, Yunfeng Yang, Lauren Hale, Qun Gao, Fanghao Wan

    Abstract:

    Invasive plant species may alter soil nutrient availability to facilitate their growth and competitiveness. However, the roles and functional mechanisms of plant-associated microbes that mediate these soil biogeochemical cycles remain elusive. Here, we studied how soil microorganisms and their functional processes differed between soils invaded by Ageratina adenophora and adjacent non-invaded soils in a region of China with heavy invasion. Our results indicated that soil nitrogen contents were over 4.32 mg/kg higher (p < 0.05) in both rhizosphere soils and bulk soils dominated by A. adenophora as compared with those in soils dominated by non-invaded plants. Concurrently, soil microbial-mediated functional processes, i.e. nitrogen fixation rate, nitrification rate and ammonification rate, were also significantly (p < 0.05) higher in either rhizosphere soils or bulk soils of invasive A. adenophora. Using a functional gene microarray, we found higher relative abundances of soil microbial genes involved in N cycling processes in A. adenophora soils, e.g. nifH, required for nitrogen fixation, which significantly correlated with ammonia contents (r = 0.35 in bulk soils, r = 0.37 in rhizosphere soils, p < 0.05) and the nitrogen fixation rate (r = 0.44, p < 0.05). We also found that the relative abundances of labile carbon decomposition genes were higher in invasive A. adenophora soils, implying a potential higher availability of carbon. These results suggest that the soil surrounding the invasive plant A. adenophora is a self-reinforcing environment. The plant litter and rhizosphere environment of the invasive may influence soil microbial communities, promoting self-supporting soil processes. Alternatively, the regions invaded by A. adenophora may have already had properties that facilitated these beneficial microbial community traits, allowing easier invasion by the exotics. Both scenarios offer important insights for the mitigation of plant invasion and provide an ecosystem-level understanding of the invasive mechanisms utilized by alien plants.

  • Ageratina adenophora invasions are associated with microbially mediated differences in biogeochemical cycles.
    The Science of the total environment, 2019
    Co-Authors: Mengxin Zhao, Wanxue Liu, Jianying Guo, Haixia Zhao, Yunfeng Yang, Lauren Hale, Qun Gao, Jizhong Zhou

    Abstract:

    Invasive plant species may alter soil nutrient availability to facilitate their growth and competitiveness. However, the roles and functional mechanisms of plant-associated microbes that mediate these soil biogeochemical cycles remain elusive. Here, we studied how soil microorganisms and their functional processes differed between soils invaded by Ageratina adenophora and adjacent non-invaded soils in a region of China with heavy invasion. Our results indicated that soil nitrogen contents were over 4.32 mg/kg higher (p 

  • Crofton Weed Ageratina adenophora (Sprengel)
    Biological Invasions and Its Management in China, 2017
    Co-Authors: Guoqing Yang, Furong Gui, Wanxue Liu, Fanghao Wan

    Abstract:

    The crofton weed, Ageratina adenophora (Sprengel), a plant native to central Mexico and Costa Rica, has invaded more than 30 countries and regions of tropical and subtropical zones. In the 1940s, it was introduced from Myanmar into the south Lincang (e.g. Cangyuan and Gengma) of Yunnan Province, China. Subsequently, this weed has widely spread throughout Southwestern China including Yunnan, Guizhou, Sichuan, Guangxi, Xizang Provinces and Chongqing, with an ongoing spread eastward and northward at a speed of 20 km per year. The crofton weed has caused serious economic losses to agriculture, forestry and livestock, and severely damaged the ecology and environment of China’s native habitats, e.g. exposure to or consumption of this weed makes livestock sick. In addition, the crofton weed can establish monocultures in places where diverse native communities once flourished. Potential invasive mechanisms of this weed have been investigated in China, e.g. biological characteristics responsible for its rapid spread, allelopathy on native plants, and effects on soil nutrition and biota. Moreover, we summarize and discuss possible control methods for the crofton weed in this chapter, including chemical control, biological control, replacement control, and comprehensive utilizing.

Jianying Guo – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Ageratina adenophora invasions are associated with microbially mediated differences in biogeochemical cycles
    Science of The Total Environment, 2019
    Co-Authors: Mengxin Zhao, Wanxue Liu, Jianying Guo, Jizhong Zhou, Haixia Zhao, Yunfeng Yang, Lauren Hale, Qun Gao, Fanghao Wan

    Abstract:

    Invasive plant species may alter soil nutrient availability to facilitate their growth and competitiveness. However, the roles and functional mechanisms of plant-associated microbes that mediate these soil biogeochemical cycles remain elusive. Here, we studied how soil microorganisms and their functional processes differed between soils invaded by Ageratina adenophora and adjacent non-invaded soils in a region of China with heavy invasion. Our results indicated that soil nitrogen contents were over 4.32 mg/kg higher (p < 0.05) in both rhizosphere soils and bulk soils dominated by A. adenophora as compared with those in soils dominated by non-invaded plants. Concurrently, soil microbial-mediated functional processes, i.e. nitrogen fixation rate, nitrification rate and ammonification rate, were also significantly (p < 0.05) higher in either rhizosphere soils or bulk soils of invasive A. adenophora. Using a functional gene microarray, we found higher relative abundances of soil microbial genes involved in N cycling processes in A. adenophora soils, e.g. nifH, required for nitrogen fixation, which significantly correlated with ammonia contents (r = 0.35 in bulk soils, r = 0.37 in rhizosphere soils, p < 0.05) and the nitrogen fixation rate (r = 0.44, p < 0.05). We also found that the relative abundances of labile carbon decomposition genes were higher in invasive A. adenophora soils, implying a potential higher availability of carbon. These results suggest that the soil surrounding the invasive plant A. adenophora is a self-reinforcing environment. The plant litter and rhizosphere environment of the invasive may influence soil microbial communities, promoting self-supporting soil processes. Alternatively, the regions invaded by A. adenophora may have already had properties that facilitated these beneficial microbial community traits, allowing easier invasion by the exotics. Both scenarios offer important insights for the mitigation of plant invasion and provide an ecosystem-level understanding of the invasive mechanisms utilized by alien plants.

  • Ageratina adenophora invasions are associated with microbially mediated differences in biogeochemical cycles.
    The Science of the total environment, 2019
    Co-Authors: Mengxin Zhao, Wanxue Liu, Jianying Guo, Haixia Zhao, Yunfeng Yang, Lauren Hale, Qun Gao, Jizhong Zhou

    Abstract:

    Invasive plant species may alter soil nutrient availability to facilitate their growth and competitiveness. However, the roles and functional mechanisms of plant-associated microbes that mediate these soil biogeochemical cycles remain elusive. Here, we studied how soil microorganisms and their functional processes differed between soils invaded by Ageratina adenophora and adjacent non-invaded soils in a region of China with heavy invasion. Our results indicated that soil nitrogen contents were over 4.32 mg/kg higher (p 

  • Invasive mechanism and control strategy of Ageratina adenophora (Sprengel).
    Science China Life Sciences, 2010
    Co-Authors: Fanghao Wan, Guoqing Yang, Furong Gui, Wanxue Liu, Jianying Guo, Sheng Qiang, Jinjun Wang, Hong-bang Niu, Wenkun Huang

    Abstract:

    In order to ascertain the invasive mechanism and control strategy of the invasive Crofton weed, Ageratina adenophora, its ecological adaptability and population differentiation, the formation of single dominant population, displacement of native plants and sustainable management strategies were investigated. The present results helped to clarify and explain such issues as the adaptability post invasion, interaction and competition between inter- and intra-species and community resistance, thereby providing important references to researches on other invasive alien species.