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Aggravated Assault

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Sean Patrick Roche – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • a comparison of Aggravated Assault rate trends in rural suburban and urban areas using the ucr and ncs ncvs 1988 2005
    Crime Prevention and Community Safety, 2019
    Co-Authors: Maria T. Kaylen, William Alex Pridemore, Sean Patrick Roche
    Abstract:

    Between the 1980s and 2000s, the USA experienced wide swings in violence rates. These swings were not experienced equally across urban, suburban, and rural areas. We employed UCR and NCS/NCVS data to compare Aggravated Assaults rates in rural, suburban, and urban areas between 1988 and 2005. As expected, urban Aggravated Assault rates tended to remain the highest. However, the crime decline was much greater for urban relative to suburban and rural areas. Further, NCS/NCVS rates were not always higher than UCR rates for a given time and location. In the latter years, UCR–NCVS rate ratios were close to one for suburban and rural areas but remained about 1.5–2.0 in urban areas. This urban–nonurban difference has implications for testing criminological theories in non-urban areas.

  • A comparison of Aggravated Assault rate trends in rural, suburban, and urban areas using the UCR and NCS/NCVS, 1988–2005
    Crime Prevention and Community Safety, 2019
    Co-Authors: Maria T. Kaylen, William Alex Pridemore, Sean Patrick Roche
    Abstract:

    Between the 1980s and 2000s, the USA experienced wide swings in violence rates. These swings were not experienced equally across urban, suburban, and rural areas. We employed UCR and NCS/NCVS data to compare Aggravated Assaults rates in rural, suburban, and urban areas between 1988 and 2005. As expected, urban Aggravated Assault rates tended to remain the highest. However, the crime decline was much greater for urban relative to suburban and rural areas. Further, NCS/NCVS rates were not always higher than UCR rates for a given time and location. In the latter years, UCR–NCVS rate ratios were close to one for suburban and rural areas but remained about 1.5–2.0 in urban areas. This urban–nonurban difference has implications for testing criminological theories in non-urban areas.

  • The Impact of Changing Demographic Composition on Aggravated Assault Victimization During the Great American Crime Decline: A Counterfactual Analysis of Rates in Urban, Suburban, and Rural Areas
    Criminal Justice Review, 2017
    Co-Authors: Maria T. Kaylen, William Alex Pridemore, Sean Patrick Roche
    Abstract:

    The United States experienced a dramatic decline in interpersonal violence rates between the early 1990s and mid-2000s. This decline, however, was much steeper in urban and suburban relative to rural areas. Prior research showed changing demographic composition can account for a substantial amount of change in inequality in victimization rates. We employed National Crime Victimization Survey data and counterfactual modeling to determine if changes in demographic composition—including proportion of population young, unmarried, male, unemployed, and in several income groups—of urban, suburban, and rural areas were partially responsible for changes between 1993 and 2005 in (1) area-specific Aggravated Assault victimization rates and (2) urban–suburban, urban–rural, and suburban–rural victimization rate ratios. Results showed changes in individual demographic characteristics played a very minor role in changes in area-specific Assault rates. The one exception was income, which explained a substantial amount o…

Maria T. Kaylen – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • a comparison of Aggravated Assault rate trends in rural suburban and urban areas using the ucr and ncs ncvs 1988 2005
    Crime Prevention and Community Safety, 2019
    Co-Authors: Maria T. Kaylen, William Alex Pridemore, Sean Patrick Roche
    Abstract:

    Between the 1980s and 2000s, the USA experienced wide swings in violence rates. These swings were not experienced equally across urban, suburban, and rural areas. We employed UCR and NCS/NCVS data to compare Aggravated Assaults rates in rural, suburban, and urban areas between 1988 and 2005. As expected, urban Aggravated Assault rates tended to remain the highest. However, the crime decline was much greater for urban relative to suburban and rural areas. Further, NCS/NCVS rates were not always higher than UCR rates for a given time and location. In the latter years, UCR–NCVS rate ratios were close to one for suburban and rural areas but remained about 1.5–2.0 in urban areas. This urban–nonurban difference has implications for testing criminological theories in non-urban areas.

  • A comparison of Aggravated Assault rate trends in rural, suburban, and urban areas using the UCR and NCS/NCVS, 1988–2005
    Crime Prevention and Community Safety, 2019
    Co-Authors: Maria T. Kaylen, William Alex Pridemore, Sean Patrick Roche
    Abstract:

    Between the 1980s and 2000s, the USA experienced wide swings in violence rates. These swings were not experienced equally across urban, suburban, and rural areas. We employed UCR and NCS/NCVS data to compare Aggravated Assaults rates in rural, suburban, and urban areas between 1988 and 2005. As expected, urban Aggravated Assault rates tended to remain the highest. However, the crime decline was much greater for urban relative to suburban and rural areas. Further, NCS/NCVS rates were not always higher than UCR rates for a given time and location. In the latter years, UCR–NCVS rate ratios were close to one for suburban and rural areas but remained about 1.5–2.0 in urban areas. This urban–nonurban difference has implications for testing criminological theories in non-urban areas.

  • The Impact of Changing Demographic Composition on Aggravated Assault Victimization During the Great American Crime Decline: A Counterfactual Analysis of Rates in Urban, Suburban, and Rural Areas
    Criminal Justice Review, 2017
    Co-Authors: Maria T. Kaylen, William Alex Pridemore, Sean Patrick Roche
    Abstract:

    The United States experienced a dramatic decline in interpersonal violence rates between the early 1990s and mid-2000s. This decline, however, was much steeper in urban and suburban relative to rural areas. Prior research showed changing demographic composition can account for a substantial amount of change in inequality in victimization rates. We employed National Crime Victimization Survey data and counterfactual modeling to determine if changes in demographic composition—including proportion of population young, unmarried, male, unemployed, and in several income groups—of urban, suburban, and rural areas were partially responsible for changes between 1993 and 2005 in (1) area-specific Aggravated Assault victimization rates and (2) urban–suburban, urban–rural, and suburban–rural victimization rate ratios. Results showed changes in individual demographic characteristics played a very minor role in changes in area-specific Assault rates. The one exception was income, which explained a substantial amount o…

William Alex Pridemore – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • a comparison of Aggravated Assault rate trends in rural suburban and urban areas using the ucr and ncs ncvs 1988 2005
    Crime Prevention and Community Safety, 2019
    Co-Authors: Maria T. Kaylen, William Alex Pridemore, Sean Patrick Roche
    Abstract:

    Between the 1980s and 2000s, the USA experienced wide swings in violence rates. These swings were not experienced equally across urban, suburban, and rural areas. We employed UCR and NCS/NCVS data to compare Aggravated Assaults rates in rural, suburban, and urban areas between 1988 and 2005. As expected, urban Aggravated Assault rates tended to remain the highest. However, the crime decline was much greater for urban relative to suburban and rural areas. Further, NCS/NCVS rates were not always higher than UCR rates for a given time and location. In the latter years, UCR–NCVS rate ratios were close to one for suburban and rural areas but remained about 1.5–2.0 in urban areas. This urban–nonurban difference has implications for testing criminological theories in non-urban areas.

  • A comparison of Aggravated Assault rate trends in rural, suburban, and urban areas using the UCR and NCS/NCVS, 1988–2005
    Crime Prevention and Community Safety, 2019
    Co-Authors: Maria T. Kaylen, William Alex Pridemore, Sean Patrick Roche
    Abstract:

    Between the 1980s and 2000s, the USA experienced wide swings in violence rates. These swings were not experienced equally across urban, suburban, and rural areas. We employed UCR and NCS/NCVS data to compare Aggravated Assaults rates in rural, suburban, and urban areas between 1988 and 2005. As expected, urban Aggravated Assault rates tended to remain the highest. However, the crime decline was much greater for urban relative to suburban and rural areas. Further, NCS/NCVS rates were not always higher than UCR rates for a given time and location. In the latter years, UCR–NCVS rate ratios were close to one for suburban and rural areas but remained about 1.5–2.0 in urban areas. This urban–nonurban difference has implications for testing criminological theories in non-urban areas.

  • The Impact of Changing Demographic Composition on Aggravated Assault Victimization During the Great American Crime Decline: A Counterfactual Analysis of Rates in Urban, Suburban, and Rural Areas
    Criminal Justice Review, 2017
    Co-Authors: Maria T. Kaylen, William Alex Pridemore, Sean Patrick Roche
    Abstract:

    The United States experienced a dramatic decline in interpersonal violence rates between the early 1990s and mid-2000s. This decline, however, was much steeper in urban and suburban relative to rural areas. Prior research showed changing demographic composition can account for a substantial amount of change in inequality in victimization rates. We employed National Crime Victimization Survey data and counterfactual modeling to determine if changes in demographic composition—including proportion of population young, unmarried, male, unemployed, and in several income groups—of urban, suburban, and rural areas were partially responsible for changes between 1993 and 2005 in (1) area-specific Aggravated Assault victimization rates and (2) urban–suburban, urban–rural, and suburban–rural victimization rate ratios. Results showed changes in individual demographic characteristics played a very minor role in changes in area-specific Assault rates. The one exception was income, which explained a substantial amount o…

Utah Court Of Appeals – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

Janet L. Lauritsen – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • When Choice of Data Matters: Analyses of U.S. Crime Trends, 1973–2012
    Journal of Quantitative Criminology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Janet L. Lauritsen, Maribeth L. Rezey, Karen Heimer
    Abstract:

    Objectives This study uses UCR and NCVS crime data to assess which data source appears to be more valid for analyses of long-term trends in crime. The relationships between UCR and NCVS trends in violence and six factors from prior research are estimated to illustrate the impact of data choice on findings about potential sources of changes in crime over time. Methods Crime-specific data from the UCR and NCVS for the period 1973–2012 are compared to each other using a variety of correlational techniques to assess correspondence in the trends, and to UCR homicide data which have been shown to be externally valid in comparison with other mortality records. Log-level trend correlations are used to describe the associations between trends in violence, homicide and the potential explanatory factors. Results Although long-term trends in robbery, burglary and motor vehicle theft in the UCR and NCVS are similar, this is not the case for rape, Aggravated Assault, or a summary measure of serious violence. NCVS trends in serious violence are more highly correlated with homicide data than are UCR trends suggesting that the NCVS is a more valid indicator of long-term trends in violence for crimes other than robbery. This is largely due to differences during the early part of the time series for Aggravated Assault and rape when the UCR data exhibited consistent increases in the rates in contrast to general declines in the NCVS. Choice of data does affect conclusions about the relationships between hypothesized explanatory factors and serious violence. Most notably, the reported association between trends in levels of gasoline lead exposure and serious violence is likely to be an artifact associated with the reliance on UCR data, as it is not found when NCVS or homicide trend data are used. Conclusions The weight of the evidence suggests that NCVS data represent more valid indicators of the trends in rape, Aggravated Assault and serious violence from 1973 to the mid-1980s. Studies of national trends in serious violence that include the 1973 to mid-1980s period should rely on NCVS and homicide data for analyses of the covariates of violent crime trends.

  • TRENDS IN THE GENDER GAP IN VIOLENT OFFENDING: NEW EVIDENCE FROM THE NATIONAL CRIME VICTIMIZATION SURVEY*
    Criminology, 2009
    Co-Authors: Janet L. Lauritsen, Karen Heimer, James P. Lynch
    Abstract:

    Recent research has compared male and female trends in violent offending in Uniform Crime Report (UCR) arrest data with similar trends derived from victims’ reports in the National Crime Victimization Survey (NCVS) and has concluded that the two data sources produce contrary findings. In this article, we reassess this issue and draw different conclusions. Using pooled National Crime Survey (NCS) and NCVS data for 1973 to 2005, we find that the female-to-male offending rate ratios for Aggravated Assault, robbery, and simple Assault have increased over time and that the narrowing of the gender gaps is very similar to patterns in UCR arrest data. In addition, we find that these patterns are in part caused by larger decreases in male than female offending after the mid-1990s and not by recent increases in violent offending rates among females. We conclude that changes in the gender gaps in Aggravated Assault, robbery, and simple Assault are real and not artifacts; therefore, these changes deserve serious attention in future research. We conclude with a discussion of several hypotheses that might account for a narrowing of the gender gap in nonlethal violent offending over time.