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Aggressive Angiomyxoma

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Chihhung Lin – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Aggressive Angiomyxoma report of a rare male buttock lesion
    Plastic and reconstructive surgery. Global open, 2018
    Co-Authors: Frank Hsieh, Kaiti Chuang, Chihhung Lin

    Abstract:

    Aggressive Angiomyxoma is a very rare benign tumor for male population with fewer than 50 cases reported since the description of this tumor. Most documented cases of Aggressive Angiomyxomas were found in genital, perineal, and pelvic regions in women of child bearing age. We report a case of a massive (> 20 cm) Aggressive Angiomyxomas in a man who presented with perineal swellings. Macroscopically the mass was highly vascular and lobulated with high similarity to plexiform neurofibroma. Microscopic examination revealed a hypocellular tumor comprising bland oval and spindle-shaped cells along with vessels of varying calibre. The accompanying stroma was myxocollagenous. Immunohistochemical staining showed CD34 and focal estrogen receptors positivity and negative staining for S100, actin, desmin, and progesterone receptors. The histologic and immunohistochemical features favored the diagnosis of Aggressive Angiomyxoma. Despite the rarity of such tumor in the male population, Aggressive Angiomyxoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis when encountering chronic para-perineal lesions.

  • Aggressive Angiomyxoma—Report of a Rare Male Buttock Lesion
    Wolters Kluwer, 2018
    Co-Authors: Frank Hsieh, Ma, Mbbchir Fracs, Kaiti Chuang, Chihhung Lin

    Abstract:

    Summary:. Aggressive Angiomyxoma is a very rare benign tumor for male population with fewer than 50 cases reported since the description of this tumor. Most documented cases of Aggressive Angiomyxomas were found in genital, perineal, and pelvic regions in women of child bearing age. We report a case of a massive (> 20 cm) Aggressive Angiomyxomas in a man who presented with perineal swellings. Macroscopically the mass was highly vascular and lobulated with high similarity to plexiform neurofibroma. Microscopic examination revealed a hypocellular tumor comprising bland oval and spindle-shaped cells along with vessels of varying calibre. The accompanying stroma was myxocollagenous. Immunohistochemical staining showed CD34 and focal estrogen receptors positivity and negative staining for S100, actin, desmin, and progesterone receptors. The histologic and immunohistochemical features favored the diagnosis of Aggressive Angiomyxoma. Despite the rarity of such tumor in the male population, Aggressive Angiomyxoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis when encountering chronic para-perineal lesions

Christopher D M Fletcher – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Aggressive Angiomyxoma reappraisal of its relationship to angiomyofibroblastoma in a series of 16 cases
    Histopathology, 1997
    Co-Authors: Scott R Granter, Marisa R Nucci, Christopher D M Fletcher

    Abstract:

    Aggressive Angiomyxoma is a distinctive soft tissue tumor associated with a high risk of local recurrence but lacks metastatic potential. This tumour occurs nearly exclusively in the soft tissues of the pelvis and perineum of adult women. The line of differentiation is not firmly established, but a fibroblastic/myofibroblastic origin has been proposed. We report 16 new cases of Aggressive Angiomyxoma of the pelvic soft tissue in women. In all cases bundles of cells, most often adjacent to vessels, with histological features of smooth muscle cells were identified. In 11 of 14 cases the myoid bundles were immunoreactive for desmin; they were also positive for smooth muscle actin in 10 of 11 cases. In 13 of 14 cases lesional stromal cells showed immunoreactivity for desmin. Three cases showed areas with histological features similar to those of angiomyofibroblastoma of the vulva, thus representing previously undescribed morphological overlap between these two entities. We conclude that Aggressive Angiomyxoma and angiomyofibroblastoma are related neoplasms in a spectrum of tumours showing myofibroblastic origin. Furthermore, the demonstration of immunoreactivity for desmin in Aggressive Angiomyxomas implies that this antibody is not helpful in discriminating between these two tumours, and the principal means of distinction remains histomorphological analysis.

  • angiomyofibroblastoma of the vulva a benign neoplasm distinct from Aggressive Angiomyxoma
    The American Journal of Surgical Pathology, 1992
    Co-Authors: Christopher D M Fletcher, Cyril Fisher, William Y W Tsang, John K C Chan

    Abstract:

    Aggressive Angiomyxoma of pelvic soft parts is a rare lesion with a high risk of recurrence. We report 10 cases of angiomyofibroblastoma, a hitherto uncharacterized benign tumor of the vulva histologically mimicking Aggressive Angiomyxoma. All patients had a vulval mass, often clinically diagnosed a

  • angiomyofibroblastoma of the vulva a benign neoplasm distinct from Aggressive Angiomyxoma
    The American Journal of Surgical Pathology, 1992
    Co-Authors: Christopher D M Fletcher, Cyril Fisher, William Y W Tsang, Kingchung Lee, John K C Chan

    Abstract:

    Aggressive Angiomyxoma of pelvic soft parts is a rare lesion with a high risk of recurrence. We report 10 cases of angiomyofibroblastoma, a hitherto uncharacterized benign tumor of the vulva histologically mimicking Aggressive Angiomyxoma. All patients had a vulval mass, often clinically diagnosed as a Bartholin’s cyst. There was no recurrence after excision. The tumors were well circumscribed, measuring 0.5-12 cm in maximum dimension. They were characterized by alternating hypercellular and hypocellular edematous zones in which abundant blood vessels (predominantly of the capillary type) were irregularly distributed. Spindled, plump spindled, and oval stromal cells were aggregated around the blood vessels, sometimes forming solid compact foci, or were loosely dispersed in the hypocellular areas. Their nuclei were bland, but rare ones were enlarged and hyperchromatic in four cases. Some cells had abundant eosinophilic hyaline cytoplasm and eccentrically placed nuclei. Mitotic figures were absent or very sparse. Scattered throughout were thin, wavy strands or thick bundles of collagen. Mast cells were readily seen in eight cases. Immunohistochemically, the stromal cells were reactive for vimentin and desmin, but not cytokeratin, muscle-specific actin, alpha-smooth muscle actin, or S-100 protein. Ultrastructural studies showed well-developed rough endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, abundant intermediate filaments, and pinocytotic vesicles in the stromal cells. Angiomyofibroblastoma can be distinguished from Aggressive Angiomyxoma by its circumscribed borders, much higher cellularity, more numerous blood vessels (which lack prominent hyalinization), frequent presence of plump stromal cells, minimal stromal mucin, and rarity of erythrocyte extravasation.

Chanhong Park – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • alternative surgical approaches for Aggressive Angiomyxoma at different sites in the pelvic cavity
    Obstetrics & gynecology science, 2015
    Co-Authors: Hongseok Choi, Chanhong Park

    Abstract:

    Aggressive Angiomyxoma, a rare soft tissue benign neoplasm, predominantly occurs in the female pelvic peritoneum and perineum region during reproductive age. It is slow growing, locally infiltrative, and has a high risk of local recurrence and the neoplastic character of blood vessels. The standard treatment is surgery. We report three unusual Aggressive Angiomyxoma cases. The first case was a pedunculated mass of the left labium major; the second, a left perineal mass that infiltrated into the paravesical area via the obturator foramen; and the third, a big mass in the retroperitoneal cavity, found that growing Aggressive Angiomyxoma looked like lava expulsion in the pelvic area. After a thorough examination and full radiologic workup, we performed surgical excision in each patient via different approaches. Histopathologic findings were consistent with diagnosis of Aggressive Angiomyxoma. To date, no relapse has been observed.