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Boleslaw K. Szymanski – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Naming games in two-dimensional and small-world-connected random geometric networks.
    Physical Review E, 2008
    Co-Authors: G. Korniss, Boleslaw K. Szymanski
    Abstract:

    We investigate a prototypical agent-based model, the Naming Game, on two-dimensional random geometric networks. The Naming Game [A. Baronchelli et al., J. Stat. Mech.: Theory Exp. (2006) P06014.] is a minimal model, employing local communications that captures the emergence of shared communication schemes (languages) in a population of autonomous semiotic agents. Implementing the Naming Games with local broadcasts on random geometric graphs, serves as a model for Agreement dynamics in large-scale, autonomously operating wireless sensor networks. Further, it captures essential features of the scaling properties of the Agreement Process for spatiallyembedded autonomous agents. Among the relevant observables capturing the temporal properties of the Agreement Process, we investigate the cluster-size distribution and the distribution of the Agreement times, both exhibiting dynamic scaling. We also present results for the case when a small density of long-range communication links are added on top of the random geometric graph, resulting in a “small-world”-like network and yielding a significantly reduced time to reach global Agreement. We construct a finite-size scaling analysis for the Agreement times in this case.

  • Naming games in two-dimensional and small-world-connected random geometric networks
    Physical Review E – Statistical Nonlinear and Soft Matter Physics, 2008
    Co-Authors: Qiming Lu, G. Korniss, Boleslaw K. Szymanski
    Abstract:

    We investigate a prototypical agent-based model, the naming game, on two-dimensional random geometric networks. The naming game [Baronchelli, J. Stat. Mech.: Theory Exp. (2006) P06014] is a minimal model, employing local communications that captures the emergence of shared communication schemes (languages) in a population of autonomous semiotic agents. Implementing the naming games with local broadcasts on random geometric graphs, serves as a model for Agreement dynamics in large-scale, autonomously operating wireless sensor networks. Further, it captures essential features of the scaling properties of the Agreement Process for spatially embedded autonomous agents. Among the relevant observables capturing the temporal properties of the Agreement Process, we investigate the cluster-size distribution and the distribution of the Agreement times, both exhibiting dynamic scaling. We also present results for the case when a small density of long-range communication links are added on top of the random geometric graph, resulting in a “small-world”-like network and yielding a significantly reduced time to reach global Agreement. We construct a finite-size scaling analysis for the Agreement times in this case.

Qiming Lu – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Naming games in two-dimensional and small-world-connected random geometric networks
    Physical Review E – Statistical Nonlinear and Soft Matter Physics, 2008
    Co-Authors: Qiming Lu, G. Korniss, Boleslaw K. Szymanski
    Abstract:

    We investigate a prototypical agent-based model, the naming game, on two-dimensional random geometric networks. The naming game [Baronchelli, J. Stat. Mech.: Theory Exp. (2006) P06014] is a minimal model, employing local communications that captures the emergence of shared communication schemes (languages) in a population of autonomous semiotic agents. Implementing the naming games with local broadcasts on random geometric graphs, serves as a model for Agreement dynamics in large-scale, autonomously operating wireless sensor networks. Further, it captures essential features of the scaling properties of the Agreement Process for spatially embedded autonomous agents. Among the relevant observables capturing the temporal properties of the Agreement Process, we investigate the cluster-size distribution and the distribution of the Agreement times, both exhibiting dynamic scaling. We also present results for the case when a small density of long-range communication links are added on top of the random geometric graph, resulting in a “small-world”-like network and yielding a significantly reduced time to reach global Agreement. We construct a finite-size scaling analysis for the Agreement times in this case.

G. Korniss – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Naming games in two-dimensional and small-world-connected random geometric networks.
    Physical Review E, 2008
    Co-Authors: G. Korniss, Boleslaw K. Szymanski
    Abstract:

    We investigate a prototypical agent-based model, the Naming Game, on two-dimensional random geometric networks. The Naming Game [A. Baronchelli et al., J. Stat. Mech.: Theory Exp. (2006) P06014.] is a minimal model, employing local communications that captures the emergence of shared communication schemes (languages) in a population of autonomous semiotic agents. Implementing the Naming Games with local broadcasts on random geometric graphs, serves as a model for Agreement dynamics in large-scale, autonomously operating wireless sensor networks. Further, it captures essential features of the scaling properties of the Agreement Process for spatiallyembedded autonomous agents. Among the relevant observables capturing the temporal properties of the Agreement Process, we investigate the cluster-size distribution and the distribution of the Agreement times, both exhibiting dynamic scaling. We also present results for the case when a small density of long-range communication links are added on top of the random geometric graph, resulting in a “small-world”-like network and yielding a significantly reduced time to reach global Agreement. We construct a finite-size scaling analysis for the Agreement times in this case.

  • Naming games in two-dimensional and small-world-connected random geometric networks
    Physical Review E – Statistical Nonlinear and Soft Matter Physics, 2008
    Co-Authors: Qiming Lu, G. Korniss, Boleslaw K. Szymanski
    Abstract:

    We investigate a prototypical agent-based model, the naming game, on two-dimensional random geometric networks. The naming game [Baronchelli, J. Stat. Mech.: Theory Exp. (2006) P06014] is a minimal model, employing local communications that captures the emergence of shared communication schemes (languages) in a population of autonomous semiotic agents. Implementing the naming games with local broadcasts on random geometric graphs, serves as a model for Agreement dynamics in large-scale, autonomously operating wireless sensor networks. Further, it captures essential features of the scaling properties of the Agreement Process for spatially embedded autonomous agents. Among the relevant observables capturing the temporal properties of the Agreement Process, we investigate the cluster-size distribution and the distribution of the Agreement times, both exhibiting dynamic scaling. We also present results for the case when a small density of long-range communication links are added on top of the random geometric graph, resulting in a “small-world”-like network and yielding a significantly reduced time to reach global Agreement. We construct a finite-size scaling analysis for the Agreement times in this case.

Pierre Horwitz – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • What Are They Taking Us For? The Participatory Nature of Western Australia’s Regional Forest Agreement Process
    Australasian Journal of Environmental Management, 2006
    Co-Authors: Martin Brueckner, John Duff, Richard J. Mckenna, Pierre Horwitz
    Abstract:

    The native forests of Western Australia (WA) have long been the subject of heated debate between policy makers, conservationists and the timber industry. A critical element of the forest dispute has been the issue of public input into the political decision-making Processes responsible for forest policy. Over the last 40 years, there has been a growth in the demands by the public for active involvement in decisions on nature conservation in WA, which were largely met by a resistant and at times hostile political apparatus. In this context, this paper offers an analysis of the participatory nature of WA’s Regional Forest Agreement (RFA) Process during the late 1990s, a Federal Government initiative aimed at resolving the nation-wide forest dispute. WA RFA stakeholders’ perceptions of the inclusiveness of the Process are presented for the purpose of providing a gauge for the extent to which community demands for participation were enabled and also as an assessment of whether WA’s RFA Process qualifies as an example of good governance. The findings point toward a systemic failure in the management of the Western Australian RFA, for the Process constrained opportunities for stakeholder input and deliberation- based decision-making. In this context, the authors highlight the need for an opening of political structures and Processes to enable and facilitate active stakeholder participation.

  • The use of science in environmental policy: A case study of the Regional Forest Agreement Process in Western Australia
    Sustainability: Science Practice and Policy, 2005
    Co-Authors: Martin Brueckner, Pierre Horwitz
    Abstract:

    This paper explores the notion of pluralism as it relates to the involvement of science in Processes of environmental policy formulation. In particular, it focuses attention on the dominance of normal science within the Australian debate on commercial forest use, management, and conservation. It presents case study information from the Western Australian Regional Forest Agreement (RFA) Process, a policy initiative designed to end a long-running conflict over public forestland. It then analyzes the use of science within this political Process, along with the respective impacts of different voices within science on the RFA outcomes. The case study data highlight the vulnerability of reductionist science within complex political debates and support arguments for a widening of the scientific basis of policy Processes to include alternative ways of understanding nature-society relations. The paper contends that such a broadening will make science not only more robust, but also more valuable as a problem-solving tool in future decision-making Processes on land use, conservation, and broader sustainability questions. It also considers the obstacles facing pluralism.

  • Credible Science? Evaluating the Regional Forest Agreement Process in Western Australia
    Australasian Journal of Environmental Management, 1998
    Co-Authors: Pierre Horwitz, Mike Calver
    Abstract:

    Government proponents of the Regional Forest Agreement Process in Western Australia have highlighted the use of scientific information in order to set criteria by which forests can be both reserved and managed in the future. Given the long-term significance of the Process, and the central role played by science, we asked what would constitute a ‘scientifically-credible Process‘ for assessing a natural resource management issue? When could scientists in general, or conservation biologists in particular be satisfied that such a Process has been achieved? To address these questions we first examined the notion of sound science, based on norms for scientific Processes, and the standards required by a range of journals to assess contributions prior to publication. From these, we developed criteria/or assessing whether or not a Process was scientific, asking: • has the Process involved scientists? • has the Process provided a framework. or facilitated in another way. scientific debate? • has the Process used scientific norms of peer review, publication and conferences? • has the Process involved explicit methodology from which conclusions can be justifiably drawn? These questions were examined for the phases of the Process during which scientific information was compiled, assessed and integrated, predominantly the Comprehensive Regional Assessment. Aspects dealing with the issues of biodiversity, endangered species, old-growth and wilderness were examined since they invoked the science of ecology. It was clear that the Regional Forest Agreement Process had involved scientists, albeit selectively, but that it had not facilitated scientific debate, failed to adhere strictly to norms of peer review, and failed to be explicit regarding many methodologies employed. We concluded that the Process could not be checked, and therefore failed to achieve what would notionally be regarded as credible science.

Michael S Broder – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • can we achieve international Agreement on terminologies and definitions used to describe abnormalities of menstrual bleeding
    Human Reproduction, 2007
    Co-Authors: Ian S Fraser, Hilary O D Critchley, Malcolm G. Munro, Michael S Broder
    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND: There is considerable worldwide confusion in the use of terminologies and definitions around the symptom of abnormal uterine bleeding (AUB), and these are leading increasingly to difficulties in setting up multinational clinical trials and in interpreting the results of studies undertaken in single centres. An international initiative was established to develop an Agreement Process to recommend clear, simple terminologies and definitions with the potential for wide acceptance. METHODS: After widespread consultation with relevant international and national organizations, journal editors and individuals, a modified Delphi Process was developed to assess the current use of terminologies followed by a structured face-to-face meeting of 35 clinicians (mostly gynaecologists) and scientists in Washington. Focused small group discussions led to plenary assessment of concepts and recommendations using an electronic keypad voting system. RESULTS: There was almost universal Agreement that poorly defined terms of classical origin used in differing ways in the English medical language should be discarded and that these should be replaced by simple, descriptive terms with clear definitions which have the potential to be understood by health professional and patient alike and which can be translated into most languages. The major recommendations were to replace terms such as menorrhagia, metrorrhagia, hypermenorrhoea and dysfunctional uterine bleeding. Suggestions for potentially suitable replacement terms and definitions are made. CONCLUSIONS: A simple terminology has been recommended for the description and definition of symptoms and signs of AUB. This manuscript should be a living document and should be part of an ongoing Process with international medical and community debate. Classification of causes, investigations and cultural and quality of life issues should be part of the ongoing Process.

  • a Process designed to lead to international Agreement on terminologies and definitions used to describe abnormalities of menstrual bleeding
    Fertility and Sterility, 2007
    Co-Authors: Ian S Fraser, Hilary O D Critchley, Malcolm G. Munro, Michael S Broder
    Abstract:

    Background There is considerable worldwide confusion in the use of terminologies and definitions around the symptom of abnormal uterine bleeding, and these are leading increasingly to difficulties in setting up multinational clinical trials and in interpreting the results of studies undertaken in single centers. Objective To develop an Agreement Process through an international initiative to recommend clear, simple terminologies and definitions that have the potential for wide acceptance. Design After widespread consultation with relevant international and national organizations, journal editors, and individuals, a modified Delphi Process was developed to assess current use of terminologies, followed by a structured face-to-face meeting of 35 clinicians (mostly gynecologists) and scientists in Washington, DC. Focused small-group discussions led to plenary assessment of concepts and recommendations by using an electronic keypad voting system. Setting An international group of experts on disorders of menstruation. Patient(s) Women with complaint of menstrual symptoms. Intervention(s) An international debate and consultation Process. Main Outcome Measure(s) Expert debate and anonymous voting on Agreement through use of electronic keypads. Result(s) There was almost-universal Agreement that poorly defined terms of classical origin that are used in differing ways in the English medical language should be discarded and that these should be replaced by simple, descriptive terms with clear definitions that have the potential to be understood by health professionals and patients alike and that can be translated into most languages. The major recommendations were to replace terms such as menorrhagia, metrorrhagia, hypermenorrhea, and dysfunctional uterine bleeding. Suggestions for potentially suitable replacement terms and definitions are made. Conclusion(s) A simple terminology has been recommended for the description and definition of symptoms and signs of abnormal uterine bleeding. This article should be a living document and should be part of an ongoing Process with international medical and community debate. Classification of causes, investigations, and cultural and quality-of-life issues should be part of the ongoing Process.