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Gílcia Aparecida De Carvalho – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • ecology of sand flies in a low density residential rural area with mixed forest Agricultural Exploitation in north eastern brazil
    Acta Tropica, 2015
    Co-Authors: Débora Elienai De Oliveira Miranda, Kamila Gaudêncio Da Silva Sales, Maria Aparecida Da Gloria Faustino, Leucio Câmara Alves, Sinval Pinto Brandaofilho, Filipe Dantastorres, Gílcia Aparecida De Carvalho

    Abstract:

    Abstract Cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania braziliensis is endemic in Brazil, where Lutzomyia whitmani is the most important vector involved in the transmission to humans, particularly in the peridomestic environment. Herein, we assessed the ecology of sand flies, including Lu. whitmani , in a low-density residential rural area with mixed forest/Agricultural Exploitation in north-eastern Brazil, where cutaneous leishmaniasis is endemic. Particularly, we hypothesized that sand fly abundance was correlated with climatic variables. Sand fly collections were carried out monthly from August 2013 to August 2014, using seven CDC light traps, for three consecutive nights, in three kinds of environments: indoor, peridomicile and forest. Collected sand flies were identified based on morphology and females of Lu . whitmani ( n  = 169), Lu . amazonensis ( n  = 134) and Lu . complexa ( n  = 21) were selected and tested by PCR for Leishmania ( Viannia ) spp. In total, 5167 sand flies belonging to 19 species were identified, being that Lu. choti (43.2%) was the most frequent species, followed by Lu . amazonensis (16.6%), Lu . whitmani (15.8%), Lu. sordellii (10.7%) and Lu. quinquefer (5.8%), which together represented over 90% of the collected sand flies. All females tested by PCR were negative. The number of sand flies collected daily was positively correlated with temperature and negatively correlated with rainfall and relative humidity. Furthermore, there was a positive correlation between daily number of sand flies and daily average saturation deficit. This study points out that the number of sand flies captured daily is correlated to climatic variables, including saturation deficit, which may represent a useful parameter for monitoring sand fly populations in leishmaniasis-endemic areas.

  • Ecology of sand flies in a low-density residential rural area, with mixed forest/Agricultural Exploitation, in north-eastern Brazil.
    Acta Tropica, 2015
    Co-Authors: Débora Elienai De Oliveira Miranda, Kamila Gaudêncio Da Silva Sales, Maria Aparecida Da Gloria Faustino, Leucio Câmara Alves, Sinval Pinto Brandão-filho, Filipe Dantas-torres, Gílcia Aparecida De Carvalho

    Abstract:

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania braziliensis is endemic in Brazil, where Lutzomyia whitmani is the most important vector involved in the transmission to humans, particularly in the peridomestic environment. Herein, we assessed the ecology of sand flies, including Lu. whitmani, in a low-density residential rural area with mixed forest/Agricultural Exploitation in north-eastern Brazil, where cutaneous leishmaniasis is endemic. Particularly, we hypothesized that sand fly abundance was correlated with climatic variables. Sand fly collections were carried out monthly from August 2013 to August 2014, using seven CDC light traps, for three consecutive nights, in three kinds of environments: indoor, peridomicile and forest. Collected sand flies were identified based on morphology and females of Lu. whitmani (n=169), Lu. amazonensis (n=134) and Lu. complexa (n=21) were selected and tested by PCR for Leishmania (Viannia) spp. In total, 5167 sand flies belonging to 19 species were identified, being that Lu. choti (43.2%) was the most frequent species, followed by Lu. amazonensis (16.6%), Lu. whitmani (15.8%), Lu. sordellii (10.7%) and Lu. quinquefer (5.8%), which together represented over 90% of the collected sand flies. All females tested by PCR were negative. The number of sand flies collected daily was positively correlated with temperature and negatively correlated with rainfall and relative humidity. Furthermore, there was a positive correlation between daily number of sand flies and daily average saturation deficit. This study points out that the number of sand flies captured daily is correlated to climatic variables, including saturation deficit, which may represent a useful parameter for monitoring sand fly populations in leishmaniasis-endemic areas.

Filipe Dantastorres – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • ecology of sand flies in a low density residential rural area with mixed forest Agricultural Exploitation in north eastern brazil
    Acta Tropica, 2015
    Co-Authors: Débora Elienai De Oliveira Miranda, Kamila Gaudêncio Da Silva Sales, Maria Aparecida Da Gloria Faustino, Leucio Câmara Alves, Sinval Pinto Brandaofilho, Filipe Dantastorres, Gílcia Aparecida De Carvalho

    Abstract:

    Abstract Cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania braziliensis is endemic in Brazil, where Lutzomyia whitmani is the most important vector involved in the transmission to humans, particularly in the peridomestic environment. Herein, we assessed the ecology of sand flies, including Lu. whitmani , in a low-density residential rural area with mixed forest/Agricultural Exploitation in north-eastern Brazil, where cutaneous leishmaniasis is endemic. Particularly, we hypothesized that sand fly abundance was correlated with climatic variables. Sand fly collections were carried out monthly from August 2013 to August 2014, using seven CDC light traps, for three consecutive nights, in three kinds of environments: indoor, peridomicile and forest. Collected sand flies were identified based on morphology and females of Lu . whitmani ( n  = 169), Lu . amazonensis ( n  = 134) and Lu . complexa ( n  = 21) were selected and tested by PCR for Leishmania ( Viannia ) spp. In total, 5167 sand flies belonging to 19 species were identified, being that Lu. choti (43.2%) was the most frequent species, followed by Lu . amazonensis (16.6%), Lu . whitmani (15.8%), Lu. sordellii (10.7%) and Lu. quinquefer (5.8%), which together represented over 90% of the collected sand flies. All females tested by PCR were negative. The number of sand flies collected daily was positively correlated with temperature and negatively correlated with rainfall and relative humidity. Furthermore, there was a positive correlation between daily number of sand flies and daily average saturation deficit. This study points out that the number of sand flies captured daily is correlated to climatic variables, including saturation deficit, which may represent a useful parameter for monitoring sand fly populations in leishmaniasis-endemic areas.

Débora Elienai De Oliveira Miranda – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • ecology of sand flies in a low density residential rural area with mixed forest Agricultural Exploitation in north eastern brazil
    Acta Tropica, 2015
    Co-Authors: Débora Elienai De Oliveira Miranda, Kamila Gaudêncio Da Silva Sales, Maria Aparecida Da Gloria Faustino, Leucio Câmara Alves, Sinval Pinto Brandaofilho, Filipe Dantastorres, Gílcia Aparecida De Carvalho

    Abstract:

    Abstract Cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania braziliensis is endemic in Brazil, where Lutzomyia whitmani is the most important vector involved in the transmission to humans, particularly in the peridomestic environment. Herein, we assessed the ecology of sand flies, including Lu. whitmani , in a low-density residential rural area with mixed forest/Agricultural Exploitation in north-eastern Brazil, where cutaneous leishmaniasis is endemic. Particularly, we hypothesized that sand fly abundance was correlated with climatic variables. Sand fly collections were carried out monthly from August 2013 to August 2014, using seven CDC light traps, for three consecutive nights, in three kinds of environments: indoor, peridomicile and forest. Collected sand flies were identified based on morphology and females of Lu . whitmani ( n  = 169), Lu . amazonensis ( n  = 134) and Lu . complexa ( n  = 21) were selected and tested by PCR for Leishmania ( Viannia ) spp. In total, 5167 sand flies belonging to 19 species were identified, being that Lu. choti (43.2%) was the most frequent species, followed by Lu . amazonensis (16.6%), Lu . whitmani (15.8%), Lu. sordellii (10.7%) and Lu. quinquefer (5.8%), which together represented over 90% of the collected sand flies. All females tested by PCR were negative. The number of sand flies collected daily was positively correlated with temperature and negatively correlated with rainfall and relative humidity. Furthermore, there was a positive correlation between daily number of sand flies and daily average saturation deficit. This study points out that the number of sand flies captured daily is correlated to climatic variables, including saturation deficit, which may represent a useful parameter for monitoring sand fly populations in leishmaniasis-endemic areas.

  • Ecology of sand flies in a low-density residential rural area, with mixed forest/Agricultural Exploitation, in north-eastern Brazil.
    Acta Tropica, 2015
    Co-Authors: Débora Elienai De Oliveira Miranda, Kamila Gaudêncio Da Silva Sales, Maria Aparecida Da Gloria Faustino, Leucio Câmara Alves, Sinval Pinto Brandão-filho, Filipe Dantas-torres, Gílcia Aparecida De Carvalho

    Abstract:

    Cutaneous leishmaniasis caused by Leishmania braziliensis is endemic in Brazil, where Lutzomyia whitmani is the most important vector involved in the transmission to humans, particularly in the peridomestic environment. Herein, we assessed the ecology of sand flies, including Lu. whitmani, in a low-density residential rural area with mixed forest/Agricultural Exploitation in north-eastern Brazil, where cutaneous leishmaniasis is endemic. Particularly, we hypothesized that sand fly abundance was correlated with climatic variables. Sand fly collections were carried out monthly from August 2013 to August 2014, using seven CDC light traps, for three consecutive nights, in three kinds of environments: indoor, peridomicile and forest. Collected sand flies were identified based on morphology and females of Lu. whitmani (n=169), Lu. amazonensis (n=134) and Lu. complexa (n=21) were selected and tested by PCR for Leishmania (Viannia) spp. In total, 5167 sand flies belonging to 19 species were identified, being that Lu. choti (43.2%) was the most frequent species, followed by Lu. amazonensis (16.6%), Lu. whitmani (15.8%), Lu. sordellii (10.7%) and Lu. quinquefer (5.8%), which together represented over 90% of the collected sand flies. All females tested by PCR were negative. The number of sand flies collected daily was positively correlated with temperature and negatively correlated with rainfall and relative humidity. Furthermore, there was a positive correlation between daily number of sand flies and daily average saturation deficit. This study points out that the number of sand flies captured daily is correlated to climatic variables, including saturation deficit, which may represent a useful parameter for monitoring sand fly populations in leishmaniasis-endemic areas.