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Laxmi Gunupudi – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Market Separations Perspective of Agricultural Markets and Successful AMIS: Beyond Technical Rationality
    , 2013
    Co-Authors: Laxmi Gunupudi, Rahul De’
    Abstract:

    Agriculture is an important economic activity and is a primary driver of economic growth of many developing countries. Improving the performance and profitability of Agricultural Markets will lead to the growth of the Agricultural sector. Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) based Agricultural Market Information Systems (AMIS) is a development initiative which promises to empower the stakeholders of the Agricultural supply chain with information and aid the development of the Agricultural sector. Many attempts have been made by governments in a number of developing countries to provide AMIS, with a poor success rate. It is important to understand the factors that determine the success or failure of these systems. In this paper we take the theoretical lens provided by Bartels’ theory of Market separations in order to define the success of AMIS. Using a technical/rational view, we conduct a two level analysis of Market separations – those in Agricultural Markets and those in AMIS services Markets. We find that information separation is a strong feature that exists in Agricultural Markets and AMIS provide good means of reducing this separation. Success of AMIS is defined by the reduction of Market separations at both these levels. Later we go beyond technical rationality and note that socio-political issues limit the utilization of Market information provided by AMIS. Thus we state that socio-political separation of Agricultural Markets must also be tackled in order to successfully implement AMIS. A comprehensive policy environment in a region can help reduce these separations.

  • TDIT – Market Separations Perspective of Agricultural Markets and Successful AMIS: Beyond Technical Rationality
    Grand Successes and Failures in IT. Public and Private Sectors, 2013
    Co-Authors: Laxmi Gunupudi
    Abstract:

    Agriculture is an important economic activity and is a primary driver of economic growth of many developing countries. Improving the performance and profitability of Agricultural Markets will lead to the growth of the Agricultural sector. Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) based Agricultural Market Information Systems (AMIS) is a development initiative which promises to empower the stakeholders of the Agricultural supply chain with information and aid the development of the Agricultural sector. Many attempts have been made by governments in a number of developing countries to provide AMIS, with a poor success rate. It is important to understand the factors that determine the success or failure of these systems. In this paper we take the theoretical lens provided by Bartels’ theory of Market separations in order to define the success of AMIS. Using a technical/rational view, we conduct a two level analysis of Market separations – those in Agricultural Markets and those in AMIS services Markets. We find that information separation is a strong feature that exists in Agricultural Markets and AMIS provide good means of reducing this separation. Success of AMIS is defined by the reduction of Market separations at both these levels. Later we go beyond technical rationality and note that socio-political issues limit the utilization of Market information provided by AMIS. Thus we state that socio-political separation of Agricultural Markets must also be tackled in order to successfully implement AMIS. A comprehensive policy environment in a region can help reduce these separations.

Graham Thiele – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • developing capacity for Agricultural Market chain innovation experience with the pmca in uganda
    Journal of International Development, 2010
    Co-Authors: Douglas Horton, Beatrice Akello, Lucy Aliguma, Thomas Bernet, Andre Devaux, B Lemaga, Damalie Babirye Magala, Sarah Mayanja, Immaculate Sekitto, Graham Thiele
    Abstract:

    The Participatory Market Chain Approach (PMCA) was developed originally to foster pro-poor innovation in potato Market chains in the Andean highlands of South America. After promising results in Peru and Bolivia, two questions emerged: (1) Could the PMCA be successfully used to stimulate innovation outside the Andes and in other commodity chains? (2) What would it take to successfully introduce and apply the PMCA in a new setting? The first test application of the approach outside of the Andes was in Uganda. This paper outlines how the PMCA was developed in the Andes and its main features. It then describes the strategies used to introduce the PMCA to Uganda and some of the results to date. The Ugandan experience indicates that the PMCA can, in fact, stimulate technological and institutional innovation in locally relevant Agricultural commodity chains in Africa. Since the PMCA requires researchers and development professionals to work in new ways with diverse stakeholders, including not only small farmers but also Market agents and policy makers, its successful introduction requires an intensive capacity-development process that fosters the development of social networks, changes in attitudes, and the acquisition of social as well as technical knowledge and skills. Copyright # 2010 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

Fabienne Femenia – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • To Subsidize or Not to Subsidize Private Storage? Evaluation of the Effects of Private Storage Subsidies as an Instrument to Stabilize Agricultural Markets After CAP Reforms
    , 2011
    Co-Authors: Fabienne Femenia
    Abstract:

    We study here the effects on Agricultural Markets volatility of a public subsidy to private storage set up after a CAP reform. This kind of instrument is indeed often advocated in current international debates focusing on the management of Agricultural price fluctuations. We use a dynamic Computable General Equilibrium model to simulate the welfare and Market stabilizing impacts of such a subsidy. The model we use assumes that agents have imperfect expectations, which allows a representation of the endogenous dimension of Agricultural Market volatility. Our results corroborate the fact, often advocated, that removing the european price support scheme tends to increase the Agricultural Markets volatility in the European Union and to decrease this volatility in the rest of the world. Furthermore, we show that private stockholding behaviours allow a reduction of Market volatility, both before and after the political reform. On the other hand, the set up of a public subsidy aimed at stimulating private stockholdings comes to scramble the Market signals sent to Agricultural producers and therefore has a destabilizing effect.

  • To subsidize or not to subsidize private? Evaluation of the effects of private storage subsidies as an instrument to stabilize Agricultural Markets after CAP reforms
    , 2010
    Co-Authors: Fabienne Femenia
    Abstract:

    We study here the effects on Agricultural Markets volatility of a public subsidy to private storage set up after a CAP reform. This kind of instrument is indeed often advocated in current international debates focusing on the management of Agricultural price fluctuations. We use a dynamic Computable General Equilibrium model to simulate the welfare and Market stabilizing impacts of such a subsidy. The model we use assumes that agents have imperfect expectations, which allows a representation of the endogenous dimension of Agricultural Market volatility. Our results corroborate the fact, often advocated, that removing the european price support scheme tends to increase the Agricultural Markets volatility in the European Union and to decrease this volatility in the rest of the world. Furthermore, we show that private stockholding behaviours allow a reduction of Market volatility, both before and after the political reform. On the other hand, the set up of a public subsidy aimed at stimulating private stockholdings comes to scramble the Market signals sent to Agricultural producers and therefore has a destabilizing effect.

Kenny Lynch – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Agricultural Market knowledge: systems for delivery of a private and public good
    The Journal of Agricultural Education and Extension, 2003
    Co-Authors: Nigel Poole, Kenny Lynch
    Abstract:

    Integration of developing-country farmers into commercial Markets is a policy widely promoted in order to enhance liverlihoods and reduce poverty. However, Agricultural producers in many countries tend to lack specialist AgriculturalMarket knowledge. The trend towards ‘Agricultural multifunctionality’ suggests that farmers should acquire commercial skills and knowledge. The need to overcome failures in AgriculturalMarket knowledge in developing economies is acute, and the inability to do so is an important source of Market failure and of losses to farmers. This article analyses the knowledge needs of Agricultural smallholders from a theoretical and practical perspective, focuses on the ‘private good’ nature of some kinds of Market knowledge, and evaluates information and communications technologies (ICT) with potential to deliver appropriate ‘private’ Market information and thereby enhance Market access. Using the appropriate medium for person-to-person transactions requires further work to ensure that …

Rahul De’ – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Market Separations Perspective of Agricultural Markets and Successful AMIS: Beyond Technical Rationality
    , 2013
    Co-Authors: Laxmi Gunupudi, Rahul De’
    Abstract:

    Agriculture is an important economic activity and is a primary driver of economic growth of many developing countries. Improving the performance and profitability of Agricultural Markets will lead to the growth of the Agricultural sector. Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) based Agricultural Market Information Systems (AMIS) is a development initiative which promises to empower the stakeholders of the Agricultural supply chain with information and aid the development of the Agricultural sector. Many attempts have been made by governments in a number of developing countries to provide AMIS, with a poor success rate. It is important to understand the factors that determine the success or failure of these systems. In this paper we take the theoretical lens provided by Bartels’ theory of Market separations in order to define the success of AMIS. Using a technical/rational view, we conduct a two level analysis of Market separations – those in Agricultural Markets and those in AMIS services Markets. We find that information separation is a strong feature that exists in Agricultural Markets and AMIS provide good means of reducing this separation. Success of AMIS is defined by the reduction of Market separations at both these levels. Later we go beyond technical rationality and note that socio-political issues limit the utilization of Market information provided by AMIS. Thus we state that socio-political separation of Agricultural Markets must also be tackled in order to successfully implement AMIS. A comprehensive policy environment in a region can help reduce these separations.