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Air Currents

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Matthias Budde – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • ruttelflug a wrist worn sensing device for tactile vertical velocity perception in 3d space
    International Symposium on Wearable Computers, 2016
    Co-Authors: Erik Pescara, Michael Beigl, Matthias Budde
    Abstract:

    Engine-less flight like Paragliding or Hang Gliding heavily relies on leveraging thermals to prolong the experience. At the same time, descending Air Currents or abnormal weather conditions potentially lead to extreme sink or lift, endangering the pilots. So-called variometers measure the vertical velocity and use auditory and visual encoding to inform pilots of their movement. However, this is often perceived as intrusive, as the loud sound of the devices can spoil flying experience or distract the pilot, especially during takeoff and landing. Vibrotactile cues offer an alternative to communicate velocity changes unobtrusively. This paper presents RuttelFlug, a wrist-worn tactile variometer. We conducted initially a formative study to explore suitable vibration patterns that can clearly be distinguished by users. The system was implemented and evaluated in-flight by experienced paraglider pilots, who rated the system as attractive and unobtrusive.

  • ISWC – RüttelFlug: a wrist-worn sensing device for tactile vertical velocity perception in 3d-space
    Proceedings of the 2016 ACM International Symposium on Wearable Computers, 2016
    Co-Authors: Erik Pescara, Michael Beigl, Matthias Budde
    Abstract:

    Engine-less flight like Paragliding or Hang Gliding heavily relies on leveraging thermals to prolong the experience. At the same time, descending Air Currents or abnormal weather conditions potentially lead to extreme sink or lift, endangering the pilots. So-called variometers measure the vertical velocity and use auditory and visual encoding to inform pilots of their movement. However, this is often perceived as intrusive, as the loud sound of the devices can spoil flying experience or distract the pilot, especially during takeoff and landing. Vibrotactile cues offer an alternative to communicate velocity changes unobtrusively. This paper presents RuttelFlug, a wrist-worn tactile variometer. We conducted initially a formative study to explore suitable vibration patterns that can clearly be distinguished by users. The system was implemented and evaluated in-flight by experienced paraglider pilots, who rated the system as attractive and unobtrusive.

Erik Pescara – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • ruttelflug a wrist worn sensing device for tactile vertical velocity perception in 3d space
    International Symposium on Wearable Computers, 2016
    Co-Authors: Erik Pescara, Michael Beigl, Matthias Budde
    Abstract:

    Engine-less flight like Paragliding or Hang Gliding heavily relies on leveraging thermals to prolong the experience. At the same time, descending Air Currents or abnormal weather conditions potentially lead to extreme sink or lift, endangering the pilots. So-called variometers measure the vertical velocity and use auditory and visual encoding to inform pilots of their movement. However, this is often perceived as intrusive, as the loud sound of the devices can spoil flying experience or distract the pilot, especially during takeoff and landing. Vibrotactile cues offer an alternative to communicate velocity changes unobtrusively. This paper presents RuttelFlug, a wrist-worn tactile variometer. We conducted initially a formative study to explore suitable vibration patterns that can clearly be distinguished by users. The system was implemented and evaluated in-flight by experienced paraglider pilots, who rated the system as attractive and unobtrusive.

  • ISWC – RüttelFlug: a wrist-worn sensing device for tactile vertical velocity perception in 3d-space
    Proceedings of the 2016 ACM International Symposium on Wearable Computers, 2016
    Co-Authors: Erik Pescara, Michael Beigl, Matthias Budde
    Abstract:

    Engine-less flight like Paragliding or Hang Gliding heavily relies on leveraging thermals to prolong the experience. At the same time, descending Air Currents or abnormal weather conditions potentially lead to extreme sink or lift, endangering the pilots. So-called variometers measure the vertical velocity and use auditory and visual encoding to inform pilots of their movement. However, this is often perceived as intrusive, as the loud sound of the devices can spoil flying experience or distract the pilot, especially during takeoff and landing. Vibrotactile cues offer an alternative to communicate velocity changes unobtrusively. This paper presents RuttelFlug, a wrist-worn tactile variometer. We conducted initially a formative study to explore suitable vibration patterns that can clearly be distinguished by users. The system was implemented and evaluated in-flight by experienced paraglider pilots, who rated the system as attractive and unobtrusive.

Michael Beigl – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • ruttelflug a wrist worn sensing device for tactile vertical velocity perception in 3d space
    International Symposium on Wearable Computers, 2016
    Co-Authors: Erik Pescara, Michael Beigl, Matthias Budde
    Abstract:

    Engine-less flight like Paragliding or Hang Gliding heavily relies on leveraging thermals to prolong the experience. At the same time, descending Air Currents or abnormal weather conditions potentially lead to extreme sink or lift, endangering the pilots. So-called variometers measure the vertical velocity and use auditory and visual encoding to inform pilots of their movement. However, this is often perceived as intrusive, as the loud sound of the devices can spoil flying experience or distract the pilot, especially during takeoff and landing. Vibrotactile cues offer an alternative to communicate velocity changes unobtrusively. This paper presents RuttelFlug, a wrist-worn tactile variometer. We conducted initially a formative study to explore suitable vibration patterns that can clearly be distinguished by users. The system was implemented and evaluated in-flight by experienced paraglider pilots, who rated the system as attractive and unobtrusive.

  • ISWC – RüttelFlug: a wrist-worn sensing device for tactile vertical velocity perception in 3d-space
    Proceedings of the 2016 ACM International Symposium on Wearable Computers, 2016
    Co-Authors: Erik Pescara, Michael Beigl, Matthias Budde
    Abstract:

    Engine-less flight like Paragliding or Hang Gliding heavily relies on leveraging thermals to prolong the experience. At the same time, descending Air Currents or abnormal weather conditions potentially lead to extreme sink or lift, endangering the pilots. So-called variometers measure the vertical velocity and use auditory and visual encoding to inform pilots of their movement. However, this is often perceived as intrusive, as the loud sound of the devices can spoil flying experience or distract the pilot, especially during takeoff and landing. Vibrotactile cues offer an alternative to communicate velocity changes unobtrusively. This paper presents RuttelFlug, a wrist-worn tactile variometer. We conducted initially a formative study to explore suitable vibration patterns that can clearly be distinguished by users. The system was implemented and evaluated in-flight by experienced paraglider pilots, who rated the system as attractive and unobtrusive.

Arthur R Richter – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • quantification of soil to plant transport of recombinant nucleopolyhedrovirus effects of soil type and moisture Air Currents and precipitation
    Applied and Environmental Microbiology, 2001
    Co-Authors: James R Fuxa, Arthur R Richter
    Abstract:

    Significantly more occlusion bodies (OB) of DuPont viral construct HzSNPV-LqhIT2, expressing a scorpion toxin, were transported by artificial rainfall to cotton plants from sandy soil (70:15:15 sand-silt-clay) than from silt (15:70:15) and significantly more from silt than from clay (15:15:70). The amounts transported by 5 versus 50 mm of precipitation were the same, and transport was zero when there was no precipitation. In treatments that included precipitation, the mean number of viable OB transported to entire, 25- to 35-cm-tall cotton plants ranged from 56 (clay soil, 5 mm of rain) to 226 (sandy soil, 50 mm of rain) OB/plant. In a second experiment, viral transport increased with increasing wind velocity (0, 16, and 31 km/h) and was greater in dry (−1.0 bar of matric potential) than in moist (−0.5 bar) soil. Wind transport was greater for virus in a clay soil than in silt or sand. Only 3.3 × 10−7 (clay soil, 5 mm rain) to 1.3 × 10−6 (sandy soil, 50 mm rain) of the OB in surrounding soil in experiment 1 or 1.1 × 10−7 (−0.5 bar sandy soil, 16-km/h wind) to 1.3 × 10−6 (−1.0 bar clay soil, 31-km/h wind) in experiment 2 were transported by rainfall or wind to cotton plants. This reduces the risk of environmental release of a recombinant nucleopolyhedrovirus (NPV), because only a very small proportion of recombinant virus in the soil reservoir is transported to vegetation, where it can be ingested by and replicate in new host insects.

Gwen A Jacobs – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • computational mechanisms of mechanosensory processing in the cricket
    The Journal of Experimental Biology, 2008
    Co-Authors: Gwen A Jacobs, John P. Miller, Zane N Aldworth
    Abstract:

    Crickets and many other orthopteran insects face the challenge of gathering sensory information from the environment from a set of multi-modal sensory organs and transforming these stimuli into patterns of neural activity that can encode behaviorally relevant stimuli. The cercal mechanosensory system transduces low frequency Air movements near the animal’s body and is involved in many behaviors including escape from predators, orientation with respect to gravity, flight steering, aggression and mating behaviors. Three populations of neurons are sensitive to both the direction and dynamics of Air Currents: an array of mechanoreceptor-coupled sensory neurons, identified local interneurons and identified projection interneurons. The sensory neurons form a functional map of Air current direction within the central nervous system that represents the direction of Air Currents as three-dimensional spatio-temporal activity patterns. These dynamic activity patterns provide excitatory input to interneurons whose sensitivity and spiking output depend on the location of the neuronal arbors within the sensory map and the biophysical and electronic properties of the cell structure. Sets of bilaterally symmetric interneurons can encode the direction of an Air current stimulus by their ensemble activity patterns, functioning much like a Cartesian coordinate system. These interneurons are capable of responding to specific dynamic stimuli with precise temporal patterns of action potentials that may encode these stimuli using temporal encoding schemes. Thus, a relatively simple mechanosensory system employs a variety of complex computational mechanisms to provide the animal with relevant information about its environment.

  • detection and analysis of Air Currents by cricketsa special insect sense
    BioScience, 1995
    Co-Authors: Gwen A Jacobs
    Abstract:

    are extracted from these signals and encoded by the animal’s sense organs? And how do higher levels of the nervous system decipher that information to bring about the appropriate response? Although people often think of all animals as having the same general types of senses (i.e., vision, audition, touch, taste, and smell), particular sensory systems have evolved in many species to enable animals to sample different aspects of their sensory environments. Well-studied examples of such exotic sensory systems include those underlying echolocation in bats, sound localization in barn owls, and electroreception in fish (reviewed in Heiligenberg 1991). My own stud-