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Göran Pershagen – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The role of Aircraft Noise annoyance and Noise sensitivity in the association between Aircraft Noise levels and medication use: results of a pooled-analysis from seven European countries
    BMC Public Health, 2021
    Co-Authors: Clémence Baudin, Marie Lefèvre, Wolfgang Babisch, Ennio Cadum, Patricia Champelovier, Konstantina Dimakopoulou, Danny Houthuijs, Jacques Lambert, Bernard Laumon, Göran Pershagen
    Abstract:

    Background Few studies have considered Aircraft Noise annoyance and Noise sensitivity in analyses of the health effects of Aircraft Noise, especially in relation to medication use. This study aims to investigate the moderating and mediating role of these two factors in the relationship between Aircraft Noise levels and medication use among 5860 residents of ten European airports included in the HYENA and DEBATS studies. Methods Information on Aircraft Noise annoyance, Noise sensitivity, medication use, and demographic, socio-economic and lifestyle factors was collected during a face-to-face interview at home. Medication was coded according to the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification. Outdoor Aircraft Noise exposure was estimated by linking the participant’s home address to Noise contours using Geographical Information Systems (GIS) methods. Logistic regressions with adjustment for potential confounding factors were used. In addition, Baron and Kenny’s recommendations were followed to investigate the moderating and mediating effects of Aircraft Noise annoyance and Noise sensitivity. Results A significant association was found between Aircraft Noise levels at night and antihypertensive medication only in the UK (OR = 1.43, 95%CI 1.19–1.73 for a 10 dB(A)-increase in L_night). No association was found with other medications. Aircraft Noise annoyance was significantly associated with the use of antihypertensive medication (OR = 1.33, 95%CI 1.14–1.56), anxiolytics (OR = 1.48, 95%CI 1.08–2.05), hypnotics and sedatives (OR = 1.60, 95%CI 1.07–2.39), and antasthmatics (OR = 1.44, 95%CI 1.07–1.96), with no difference between countries. Noise sensitivity was significantly associated with almost all medications, with the exception of the use of antasthmatics, showing an increase in ORs with the level of Noise sensitivity, with differences in ORs among countries only for the use of antihypertensive medication. The results also suggested a mediating role of Aircraft Noise annoyance and a modifying role of both Aircraft Noise annoyance and Noise sensitivity in the association between Aircraft Noise levels and medication use. Conclusions The present study is consistent with the results of the small number of studies available to date suggesting that both Aircraft Noise annoyance and Noise sensitivity should be taken into account in analyses of the health effects of exposure to Aircraft Noise.

  • The role of Aircraft Noise annoyance and Noise sensitivity in the association between Aircraft Noise levels and hypertension risk: Results of a pooled analysis from seven European countries
    Environmental Research, 2020
    Co-Authors: Clémence Baudin, Marie Lefèvre, Wolfgang Babisch, Ennio Cadum, Patricia Champelovier, Konstantina Dimakopoulou, Danny Houthuijs, Jacques Lambert, Bernard Laumon, Göran Pershagen
    Abstract:

    Introduction Many studies, including the HYENA and the DEBATS studies, showed a significant association between Aircraft Noise exposure and the risk of hypertension. Few studies have considered Aircraft Noise annoyance and Noise sensitivity as factors of interest, especially in relation to hypertension risk, or as mediating or modifying factors. The present study aims 1) to investigate the risk of hypertension in relation to Aircraft Noise annoyance or Noise sensitivity; and 2) to examine the role of modifier or mediator of these two factors in the association between Aircraft Noise levels and the risk of hypertension. Methods This study included 6,105 residents of ten European airports from the HYENA and DEBATS studies. Information on Aircraft Noise annoyance, Noise sensitivity, and demographic, socioeconomic and lifestyle factors was collected during an interview performed at home. Participants were classified as hypertensive if they had either blood pressure levels above the WHO cut-off points or physician-diagnosed hypertension in conjunction with the use of antihypertensive medication. Outdoor Aircraft Noise exposure was estimated for each participant's home address. Poisson regression models with adjustment for potential confounders were used. Interactions between Noise exposure and country were tested to consider possible differences between countries. Results An increase in Aircraft Noise levels at night was weekly but significantly associated with an increased risk of hypertension (RR=1.03, 95% CI 1.01-1.06 for a 10-dB(A) increase in Lnight). A significant association was found between Aircraft Noise annoyance and hypertension risk (RR=1.06, 95%CI 1.00-1.13 for highly annoyed people compared to those who were not highly annoyed). The risk of hypertension was slightly higher for people highly sensitive to Noise compared to people with low sensitivity in the UK (RR=1.29, 95%CI 1.05-1.59) and in France (RR=1.11, 95%CI 0.68-1.82), but not in the other countries. The association between Aircraft Noise levels and the risk of hypertension was higher among highly sensitive participants (RR=1.00, 95%CI 0.96-1.04; RR=1.03, 95%CI 0.90-1.11; RR=1.12, 95%CI 1.01-1.24, with a 10-dB(A) increase in Lnight for low, medium, and high sensitive people respectively) or, to a lesser extent, among highly annoyed participants (RR=1.06, 95%CI 0.95-1.18 for a 10-dB(A) increase in Lnight among highly annoyed participants, and RR=1.02, 95%CI 0.99-1.06 among those not highly annoyed). Conclusions The present study confirms findings in the small number of available studies to date suggesting adverse health effects associated with Aircraft Noise annoyance and Noise sensitivity. The findings also indicate possible modifier effects of Aircraft Noise annoyance and Noise sensitivity in the relationship between Aircraft Noise levels and the risk of hypertension. However, further investigations are needed to better understand this role using specific methodology and tools related to mediation analysis and causal inference.

  • Aircraft Noise and metabolic outcomes
    ISEE Conference Abstracts, 2013
    Co-Authors: Charlotta Eriksson, Gösta Bluhm, Göran Pershagen, Agneta Hilding, Andrei Pyko, Claes-göran Östenson
    Abstract:

    Background: Long-term Aircraft Noise exposure may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, but no study has investigated chronic effects on the metabolic system. Aims: The aim of this study was…

Gösta Bluhm – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Aircraft Noise and metabolic outcomes
    ISEE Conference Abstracts, 2013
    Co-Authors: Charlotta Eriksson, Gösta Bluhm, Göran Pershagen, Agneta Hilding, Andrei Pyko, Claes-göran Östenson
    Abstract:

    Background: Long-term Aircraft Noise exposure may increase the risk of cardiovascular disease, but no study has investigated chronic effects on the metabolic system. Aims: The aim of this study was…

  • Aircraft Noise and incidence of hypertension gender specific effects
    Environmental Research, 2010
    Co-Authors: Charlotta Eriksson, Gösta Bluhm, Agneta Hilding, Claes-göran Östenson, Göran Pershagen
    Abstract:

    Abstract Recent studies show associations between Aircraft Noise and cardiovascular outcomes such as hypertension. However, these studies were mostly cross-sectional and there are uncertainties regarding potential gender differences as well as sensitive subgroups. In this study, we investigated the cumulative incidence of hypertension in relation to Aircraft Noise exposure among Swedish men and women living in Stockholm County. A total of 4721 subjects, aged 35–56 at baseline, were followed for 8–10 years. The population was selected according to family history of diabetes, which was present for half of the subjects. The exposure assessment was performed by geographical information systems and based on residential history during the period of follow-up. Blood pressure was measured at baseline and at the end of follow-up. Additional information regarding diagnosis and treatment of hypertension as well as various lifestyle factors was provided by questionnaires. In the overall population, no increased risk for hypertension was found among subjects exposed to Aircraft Noise ≥50 dB(A) Lden; relative risk (RR) 1.02 (95% CI 0.90–1.15). When restricting the cohort to those not using tobacco at the blood pressure measurements, a significant risk increase per 5 dB(A) of Aircraft Noise exposure was found in men; RR 1.21 (1.05–1.39), but not in women; RR 0.97 (0.83–1.13). In both sexes combined, an increased risk of hypertension related to Aircraft Noise exposure was indicated primarily among those reporting annoyance to Aircraft Noise; RR 1.42 (1.11–1.82). No consistent effect modification was detected for any of the cardiovascular risk factors under investigation although a family history of diabetes appeared to modify the risk in women. In conclusion, the results suggest an increased risk of hypertension following long-term Aircraft Noise exposure in men, and that subjects annoyed by Aircraft Noise may be particularly sensitive to Noise related hypertension.

  • Aircraft Noise and incidence of hypertension—Gender specific effects
    Environmental research, 2010
    Co-Authors: Charlotta Eriksson, Gösta Bluhm, Agneta Hilding, Claes-göran Östenson, Göran Pershagen
    Abstract:

    Abstract Recent studies show associations between Aircraft Noise and cardiovascular outcomes such as hypertension. However, these studies were mostly cross-sectional and there are uncertainties regarding potential gender differences as well as sensitive subgroups. In this study, we investigated the cumulative incidence of hypertension in relation to Aircraft Noise exposure among Swedish men and women living in Stockholm County. A total of 4721 subjects, aged 35–56 at baseline, were followed for 8–10 years. The population was selected according to family history of diabetes, which was present for half of the subjects. The exposure assessment was performed by geographical information systems and based on residential history during the period of follow-up. Blood pressure was measured at baseline and at the end of follow-up. Additional information regarding diagnosis and treatment of hypertension as well as various lifestyle factors was provided by questionnaires. In the overall population, no increased risk for hypertension was found among subjects exposed to Aircraft Noise ≥50 dB(A) Lden; relative risk (RR) 1.02 (95% CI 0.90–1.15). When restricting the cohort to those not using tobacco at the blood pressure measurements, a significant risk increase per 5 dB(A) of Aircraft Noise exposure was found in men; RR 1.21 (1.05–1.39), but not in women; RR 0.97 (0.83–1.13). In both sexes combined, an increased risk of hypertension related to Aircraft Noise exposure was indicated primarily among those reporting annoyance to Aircraft Noise; RR 1.42 (1.11–1.82). No consistent effect modification was detected for any of the cardiovascular risk factors under investigation although a family history of diabetes appeared to modify the risk in women. In conclusion, the results suggest an increased risk of hypertension following long-term Aircraft Noise exposure in men, and that subjects annoyed by Aircraft Noise may be particularly sensitive to Noise related hypertension.

Clémence Baudin – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The role of Aircraft Noise annoyance and Noise sensitivity in the association between Aircraft Noise levels and medication use: results of a pooled-analysis from seven European countries
    BMC Public Health, 2021
    Co-Authors: Clémence Baudin, Marie Lefèvre, Wolfgang Babisch, Ennio Cadum, Patricia Champelovier, Konstantina Dimakopoulou, Danny Houthuijs, Jacques Lambert, Bernard Laumon, Göran Pershagen
    Abstract:

    Background Few studies have considered Aircraft Noise annoyance and Noise sensitivity in analyses of the health effects of Aircraft Noise, especially in relation to medication use. This study aims to investigate the moderating and mediating role of these two factors in the relationship between Aircraft Noise levels and medication use among 5860 residents of ten European airports included in the HYENA and DEBATS studies. Methods Information on Aircraft Noise annoyance, Noise sensitivity, medication use, and demographic, socio-economic and lifestyle factors was collected during a face-to-face interview at home. Medication was coded according to the Anatomical Therapeutic Chemical (ATC) classification. Outdoor Aircraft Noise exposure was estimated by linking the participant’s home address to Noise contours using Geographical Information Systems (GIS) methods. Logistic regressions with adjustment for potential confounding factors were used. In addition, Baron and Kenny’s recommendations were followed to investigate the moderating and mediating effects of Aircraft Noise annoyance and Noise sensitivity. Results A significant association was found between Aircraft Noise levels at night and antihypertensive medication only in the UK (OR = 1.43, 95%CI 1.19–1.73 for a 10 dB(A)-increase in L_night). No association was found with other medications. Aircraft Noise annoyance was significantly associated with the use of antihypertensive medication (OR = 1.33, 95%CI 1.14–1.56), anxiolytics (OR = 1.48, 95%CI 1.08–2.05), hypnotics and sedatives (OR = 1.60, 95%CI 1.07–2.39), and antasthmatics (OR = 1.44, 95%CI 1.07–1.96), with no difference between countries. Noise sensitivity was significantly associated with almost all medications, with the exception of the use of antasthmatics, showing an increase in ORs with the level of Noise sensitivity, with differences in ORs among countries only for the use of antihypertensive medication. The results also suggested a mediating role of Aircraft Noise annoyance and a modifying role of both Aircraft Noise annoyance and Noise sensitivity in the association between Aircraft Noise levels and medication use. Conclusions The present study is consistent with the results of the small number of studies available to date suggesting that both Aircraft Noise annoyance and Noise sensitivity should be taken into account in analyses of the health effects of exposure to Aircraft Noise.

  • The role of Aircraft Noise annoyance and Noise sensitivity in the association between Aircraft Noise levels and hypertension risk: Results of a pooled analysis from seven European countries
    Environmental Research, 2020
    Co-Authors: Clémence Baudin, Marie Lefèvre, Wolfgang Babisch, Ennio Cadum, Patricia Champelovier, Konstantina Dimakopoulou, Danny Houthuijs, Jacques Lambert, Bernard Laumon, Göran Pershagen
    Abstract:

    Introduction Many studies, including the HYENA and the DEBATS studies, showed a significant association between Aircraft Noise exposure and the risk of hypertension. Few studies have considered Aircraft Noise annoyance and Noise sensitivity as factors of interest, especially in relation to hypertension risk, or as mediating or modifying factors. The present study aims 1) to investigate the risk of hypertension in relation to Aircraft Noise annoyance or Noise sensitivity; and 2) to examine the role of modifier or mediator of these two factors in the association between Aircraft Noise levels and the risk of hypertension. Methods This study included 6,105 residents of ten European airports from the HYENA and DEBATS studies. Information on Aircraft Noise annoyance, Noise sensitivity, and demographic, socioeconomic and lifestyle factors was collected during an interview performed at home. Participants were classified as hypertensive if they had either blood pressure levels above the WHO cut-off points or physician-diagnosed hypertension in conjunction with the use of antihypertensive medication. Outdoor Aircraft Noise exposure was estimated for each participant's home address. Poisson regression models with adjustment for potential confounders were used. Interactions between Noise exposure and country were tested to consider possible differences between countries. Results An increase in Aircraft Noise levels at night was weekly but significantly associated with an increased risk of hypertension (RR=1.03, 95% CI 1.01-1.06 for a 10-dB(A) increase in Lnight). A significant association was found between Aircraft Noise annoyance and hypertension risk (RR=1.06, 95%CI 1.00-1.13 for highly annoyed people compared to those who were not highly annoyed). The risk of hypertension was slightly higher for people highly sensitive to Noise compared to people with low sensitivity in the UK (RR=1.29, 95%CI 1.05-1.59) and in France (RR=1.11, 95%CI 0.68-1.82), but not in the other countries. The association between Aircraft Noise levels and the risk of hypertension was higher among highly sensitive participants (RR=1.00, 95%CI 0.96-1.04; RR=1.03, 95%CI 0.90-1.11; RR=1.12, 95%CI 1.01-1.24, with a 10-dB(A) increase in Lnight for low, medium, and high sensitive people respectively) or, to a lesser extent, among highly annoyed participants (RR=1.06, 95%CI 0.95-1.18 for a 10-dB(A) increase in Lnight among highly annoyed participants, and RR=1.02, 95%CI 0.99-1.06 among those not highly annoyed). Conclusions The present study confirms findings in the small number of available studies to date suggesting adverse health effects associated with Aircraft Noise annoyance and Noise sensitivity. The findings also indicate possible modifier effects of Aircraft Noise annoyance and Noise sensitivity in the relationship between Aircraft Noise levels and the risk of hypertension. However, further investigations are needed to better understand this role using specific methodology and tools related to mediation analysis and causal inference.

Mats Rosenlund – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Aircraft Noise and incidence of hypertension.
    Epidemiology (Cambridge Mass.), 2007
    Co-Authors: Charlotta Eriksson, Mats Rosenlund, Göran Pershagen, Agneta Hilding, Claes-göran Östenson, Gösta Bluhm
    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND: An association between Aircraft Noise exposure and hypertension prevalence has been suggested but there are no longitudinal studies of this association. Our aim was to investigate the influence of Aircraft Noise on the incidence of hypertension. METHODS: A cohort of 2754 men in 4 municipalities around Stockholm Arlanda airport was followed between 1992-1994 and 2002-2004. The cohort was based on the Stockholm Diabetes Preventive Program; half of the study subjects had a family history of diabetes. Residential Aircraft Noise exposure (expressed as time-weighted equal energy and maximal Noise levels) was assessed by geographical information systems techniques among those living near the airport. Incident cases of hypertension were identified by physical examinations, including blood pressure measurements, and questionnaires in which subjects reported treatment or diagnosis of hypertension and information on cardiovascular risk factors. Analyses were restricted to 2027 subjects who completed the follow-up examination, were not treated for hypertension, and had a blood pressure below 140/90 mm Hg at enrollment. RESULTS: For subjects exposed to energy-averaged levels above 50 dB(A) the adjusted relative risk for hypertension was 1.19 (95% CI = 1.03-1.37). Maximum Aircraft Noise levels presented similar results, with a relative risk of 1.20 (1.03-1.40) for those exposed above 70 dB(A). Stronger associations were suggested among older subjects, those with a normal glucose tolerance, nonsmokers, and subjects not annoyed by Noise from other sources. CONCLUSION: These findings suggest that long-term Aircraft Noise exposure may increase the risk for hypertension. Language: en

  • Increased prevalence of hypertension in a population exposed to Aircraft Noise.
    Occupational and environmental medicine, 2001
    Co-Authors: Mats Rosenlund, Göran Pershagen, Niklas Berglind, L Jarup, Gösta Bluhm
    Abstract:

    Objectives—To investigate whether there is a relation between residential exposure to Aircraft Noise and hypertension. Methods—The study population comprised two random samples of subjects aged 19‐80 years, one including 266 residents in the vicinity of Stockholm Arlanda airport, and another comprising 2693 inhabitants in other parts of Stockholm county. The subjects were classified according to the time weighted equal energy and maximum Aircraft Noise levels at their residence. A questionnaire provided information on individual characteristics including history of hypertension. Results—The prevalence odds ratio for hypertension adjusted for age, sex, smoking, and education was 1.6 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.0 to 2.5) among those with energy averaged Aircraft Noise levels exceeding 55 dBA, and 1.8 (95% CI 1.1 to 2.8) among those with maximum Aircraft Noise levels exceeding 72 dBA. An exposure-response relation was suggested for both exposure measures. The exposure to Aircraft Noise seemed particularly important for older subjects and for those not reporting impaired hearing ability. Conclusions—Community exposure to Aircraft Noise may be associated with hypertension. (Occup Environ Med 2001;58:769‐773)

  • Increased prevalence of hypertension in a population exposed to Aircraft Noise. Editorial
    Occupational and Environmental Medicine, 2001
    Co-Authors: S. Pattenden, Mats Rosenlund, Göran Pershagen, Niklas Berglind, L Jarup, Gösta Bluhm
    Abstract:

    Objectives-To investigate whether there is a relation between residential exposure to Aircraft Noise and hypertension. Methods-The study population comprised two random samples of subjects aged 19-80 years, one including 266 residents in the vicinity of Stockholm Arlanda airport, and another comprising 2693 inhabitants in other parts of Stockholm county. The subjects were classified according to the time weighted equal energy and maximum Aircraft Noise levels at their residence. A questionnaire provided information on individual characteristics including history of hypertension. Results-The prevalence odds ratio for hypertension adjusted for age, sex, smoking, and education was 1.6 (95% confidence interval (95% CI) 1.0 to 2.5) among those with energy averaged Aircraft Noise levels exceeding 55 dBA, and 1.8 (95% CI 1.1 to 2.8) among those with maximum Aircraft Noise levels exceeding 72 dBA. An exposure-response relation was suggested for both exposure measures. The exposure to Aircraft Noise seemed particularly important for older subjects and for those not reporting impaired hearing ability. Conclusions-Community exposure to Aircraft Noise may be associated with hypertension.

Sanford Fidell – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Aircraft Noise Measurement and Modeling
    A Guide To U.S. Aircraft Noise Regulatory Policy, 2020
    Co-Authors: Sanford Fidell, Vincent Mestre
    Abstract:

    Community exposure to Aircraft Noise can be both measured and modeled. Modeling (i.e., prediction) of Noise exposure is unavoidable in prospective applications, such as disclosure of the impacts of proposed airport infrastructure construction, since Noise that has not yet been created cannot be directly measured. Measurement is more useful for retrospective purposes, such as monitoring and reporting of Noise created by ongoing airport operations, and also for Aircraft Noise certification, per FAR Part 36.

  • Review of field studies of Aircraft Noise-induced sleep disturbance
    The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 2007
    Co-Authors: David S. Michaud, Sanford Fidell, Karl S. Pearsons, Kenneth C. Campbell, Stephen E. Keith
    Abstract:

    Aircraft Noise-induced sleep disturbance (AN-ISD) is potentially among the more serious effects of Aircraft Noise on people. This literature review of recent field studies of AN-ISD finds that reliable generalization of findings to population-level effects is complicated by individual differences among subjects, methodological and analytic differences among studies, and predictive relationships that account for only a small fraction of the variance in the relationship between Noise exposure and sleep disturbance. It is nonetheless apparent in the studied circumstances of residential exposure that sleep disturbance effects of nighttime Aircraft Noise intrusions are not dramatic on a per-event basis, and that linkages between outdoor Aircraft Noise exposure and sleep disturbance are tenuous. It is also apparent that AN-ISD occurs more often during later than earlier parts of the night; that indoor sound levels are more closely associated with sleep disturbance than outdoor measures; and that spontaneous awakenings, or awakenings attributable to nonAircraft indoor Noises, occur more often than awakenings attributed to Aircraft Noise. Predictions of sleep disturbance due to Aircraft Noise should not be based on over-simplifications of the findings of the reviewed studies, and these reports should be treated with caution in developing regulatory policy for Aircraft Noise.

  • Error of estimation of community reaction to Aircraft Noise
    The Journal of the Acoustical Society of America, 2005
    Co-Authors: Sanford Fidell
    Abstract:

    Errors and uncertainties of measurement, estimation, and prediction of Aircraft Noise exposure and of community reaction to it can be so great as to render dosage‐effect analyses of community response to Aircraft Noise unreliable. Biases and other errors may arise during routine monitoring of Aircraft Noise, via oversimplification and misrepresentation of exposure and sound propagation conditions in predictive Noise modeling, through sampling and interviewing procedures, and from poor statistical association in functional relationships between community response and acoustic predictor variables. Some of the more notable uncertainties afflicting the prediction of Aircraft Noise and its effects are described in this presentation.