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Valery Masson – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • effect of small scale surface heterogeneities and Buildings on radiation fog large eddy simulation study at paris charles de gaulle Airport
    Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, 2015
    Co-Authors: Thierry Bergot, Juan Escobar, Valery Masson
    Abstract:

    Large-eddy simulations (LES) of radiation fog were performed over an Airport area to study the effect of urban canopy on fog. These LES were performed with the Meso-NH research model at very high resolution: 1.5 m in the horizontal and 1 m in the vertical and over a domain 4.5 km × 1.5 km. The blocking effect of the Airport Buildings led to strong wind shear and consequently to the production of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). The Airport Buildings also had a strong effect on vertical velocity, with a subsidence region behind the Buildings. The increase of both turbulence and vertical velocity strongly modified the fog formation. The fog layer took more time to form in the Airport area, but the increase in turbulence facilitated the vertical development of the fog layer. The fog took 1.5 h to form over the whole simulated Airport area. The fog height was heterogeneous during the formation phase, with the formation of very low clouds locally. The effect of Airport Buildings on vertical velocity could explain these heterogeneities of the fog height. During the mature phase of the fog, the Buildings had little impact on the fog layer characteristics. The fog dynamics were mainly controlled by processes at its top. These results suggest that the inclusion of high levels of detail in the building representation remains important for the local forecasting of fog formation. Particularly, small-scale heterogeneities can explain the spatial variability of fog formation. It seems necessary to take small-scale variability of the urban canopy into account for local and accurate forecasts of fog formation over Airport areas.

Ricardo Rüther – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Energetic contribution potential of building-integrated photovoltaics on Airports in warm climates
    Solar Energy, 2009
    Co-Authors: Ricardo Rüther, Priscila Braun
    Abstract:

    Abstract Especially in warm climates, a considerable fraction of the electricity demand in commercial Buildings is due to the intensive use of air-conditioning systems. Airport Buildings in sunny and warm regions present a perfect match between energy demand and solar resource availability. Airport Buildings are also typically large and horizontal, isolated and free of shading, and have a great potential for the integration of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. In this work, we assess the potential impact in energy demademand reduction at the Florianopolis International Airport in Brazil (27°S, 48°W) with the use of building-integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) systems. We analyse the building’s hourly energy consumption and solar irrairradiation data, to assess the match between energy demand and potential generation, and we estimate the PV power necessary to supply both the total amount and fractions of the annual energy demand. Our results show that the integration of PV systems on Airport Buildings in warm climates can supply the entire electric powepower consumption of an Airport complex, in line with the general concept of a zero-energy building (ZEB).

  • Solar Energy on Airports: The Impact of Large Scale Photovoltaic Systems on Distribution Networks
    , 2008
    Co-Authors: C. Wittwer, Ricardo Rüther, B. Wille-haussmann, P. Braun
    Abstract:

    Over the last two decades, many photovoltaic (PV) systems have been connected to electricity distribution networks worldwide. Electricity utilities are often required to promote adaptations to their distribution systems in order to accommodate and to operate this kind of generators. This raises the issue of penetration limits for distributed PV generation. Airport Buildings are typically large, isolated and free of shading, and they represent a great potential for the application of large scale PV systems. The energy demand patterns characterized by intensive utilization of air-conditioning, Airport building energy demands correlates very good with solar generation profiles. For higher penetration ratios of distributed PV generation, to supply the energy levels demanded on Airports, there are some concerns about voltage rise. Depending on the network configuration, severe problems might be faced, which would require costly grid structure upgrading. Also, protection schemes might eventually need adaptation to bidirectional power flows. The aim of this paper is to quantify the potential impact in the conventional distribution network where the Airports are located. The results of the load flow analysis show that violations of the tolerated voltage rage only occur in worst-case scenario with zero load and maximal PV input.

  • Solar Airports: A future multi-billion Euro PV market?
    Refocus, 2005
    Co-Authors: Ricardo Rüther, Priscila Braun
    Abstract:

    Airports are typically large, isolated, shade-free structures that are visited by millions of people every year presenting the perfect platform for PV both in terms of available solar resource and for awareness raising of the technology with the public. Ricardo Ruther and Priscila Braun present the case for PV integration on Airport Buildings and Airport grounds worldwide and argue that it could become a multi-billion euro market for solar PV.

Thierry Bergot – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • effect of small scale surface heterogeneities and Buildings on radiation fog large eddy simulation study at paris charles de gaulle Airport
    Quarterly Journal of the Royal Meteorological Society, 2015
    Co-Authors: Thierry Bergot, Juan Escobar, Valery Masson
    Abstract:

    Large-eddy simulations (LES) of radiation fog were performed over an Airport area to study the effect of urban canopy on fog. These LES were performed with the Meso-NH research model at very high resolution: 1.5 m in the horizontal and 1 m in the vertical and over a domain 4.5 km × 1.5 km. The blocking effect of the Airport Buildings led to strong wind shear and consequently to the production of turbulent kinetic energy (TKE). The Airport Buildings also had a strong effect on vertical velocity, with a subsidence region behind the Buildings. The increase of both turbulence and vertical velocity strongly modified the fog formation. The fog layer took more time to form in the Airport area, but the increase in turbulence facilitated the vertical development of the fog layer. The fog took 1.5 h to form over the whole simulated Airport area. The fog height was heterogeneous during the formation phase, with the formation of very low clouds locally. The effect of Airport Buildings on vertical velocity could explain these heterogeneities of the fog height. During the mature phase of the fog, the Buildings had little impact on the fog layer characteristics. The fog dynamics were mainly controlled by processes at its top. These results suggest that the inclusion of high levels of detail in the building representation remains important for the local forecasting of fog formation. Particularly, small-scale heterogeneities can explain the spatial variability of fog formation. It seems necessary to take small-scale variability of the urban canopy into account for local and accurate forecasts of fog formation over Airport areas.

Abdulhameed Danjuma Mambo – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Evaluation of Indoor Environment System Performance for Airport Buildings
    International Journal of Literature and Arts, 2015
    Co-Authors: Abdulhameed Danjuma Mambo, Mahroo Eftekhari, Thomas Steffen
    Abstract:

    Airport terminals are energy intensive Buildings. They are mostly thought to operate on a 24/7 scale and so indoor environment systems run on full schedules and do not have fine control based on detailed passenger flow information. While this assumption of round-the-clock operation may be true for the public areas of the Airport building and so opportunity for complete shut-down of HVAC and lighting systems are limited especially in a busy Airport terminals, there are many passenger exclusive area within the Airport in which occupancy varies strictly with flight schedules. This paper presents the results of indoor environment measurement and flight schedules to identify such opportunities and to implement energy conservation measure in the passenger exclusive areas of the Airport building. It also uses building simulation to assess the benefits of such energy saving interventions in terms of comfort, energy and carbon emission savings.

  • Supervisory Control of Indoor Environment Systems to Minimise the Carbon Footprint of Airport Terminal Buildings – A Review
    Sustainability in Energy and Buildings, 2012
    Co-Authors: Abdulhameed Danjuma Mambo, Mahroo Efthekhari
    Abstract:

    The awareness on the ever more accurate scientific evidence confirming the use of fossil energy as the major recipe for climate change has resulted in renewed economic and political pressure which has prompted the aviation industries and its infrastructures to be reset within the concept of reducing the effect of global warming and reducing maintenance and operating cost. Airport terminal Buildings, different in contents and functions to other commercial Buildings, are among the most energy consuming Buildings. Also Airport Buildings contain components that are complex, non-linear but dynamically related. While energy saving techniques exists for new Airport Buildings, most of the existing Airport terminal Buildings will be in operation for the next 50 years. The engineering response being considered in this paper to the problems of carbon emission in existing terminal Buildings is the control and integration of active and passive indoor environment systems in response to external conditions and passenger flow. This paper discusses the unique nature, the comfort criteria, the control set-points, control strategy for the indoor micro-climates of the Airport terminal building. An initial approach to designing an innovative supervisory controller as a retrofitting part-way to improve the intelligence, sensitivity and integratabilty of the existing indoor environment control infrastructure in a UK Airport together with the process of using a computer software SIMBAD as a virtual environment for building control will be presented.

  • supervisory control of indoor environment systems to minimise the carbon footprint of Airport terminal Buildings a review
    , 2012
    Co-Authors: Abdulhameed Danjuma Mambo, Mahroo Efthekhari
    Abstract:

    The awareness on the ever more accurate scientific evidence confirming the use of fossil energy as the major recipe for climate change has resulted in renewed economic and political pressure which has prompted the aviation industries and its infrastructures to be reset within the concept of reducing the effect of global warming and reducing maintenance and operating cost. Airport terminal Buildings, different in contents and functions to other commercial Buildings, are among the most energy consuming Buildings. Also Airport Buildings contain components that are complex, non-linear but dynamically related. While energy saving techniques exists for new Airport Buildings, most of the existing Airport terminal Buildings will be in operation for the next 50 years. The engineering response being considered in this paper to the problems of carbon emission in existing terminal Buildings is the control and integration of active and passive indoor environment systems in response to external conditions and passenger flow. This paper discusses the unique nature, the comfort criteria, the control set-points, control strategy for the indoor micro-climates of the Airport terminal building. An initial approach to designing an innovative supervisory controller as a retrofitting part-way to improve the intelligence, sensitivity and integratabilty of the existing indoor environment control infrastructure in a UK Airport together with the process of using a computer software SIMBAD as a virtual environment for building control will be presented.

Priscila Braun – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Energetic contribution potential of building-integrated photovoltaics on Airports in warm climates
    Solar Energy, 2009
    Co-Authors: Ricardo Rüther, Priscila Braun
    Abstract:

    Abstract Especially in warm climates, a considerable fraction of the electricity demand in commercial Buildings is due to the intensive use of air-conditioning systems. Airport Buildings in sunny and warm regions present a perfect match between energy demand and solar resource availability. Airport Buildings are also typically large and horizontal, isolated and free of shading, and have a great potential for the integration of solar photovoltaic (PV) systems. In this work, we assess the potential impact in energy demand reduction at the Florianopolis International Airport in Brazil (27°S, 48°W) with the use of building-integrated photovoltaic (BIPV) systems. We analyse the building’s hourly energy consumption and solar irradiation data, to assess the match between energy demand and potential generation, and we estimate the PV power necessary to supply both the total amount and fractions of the annual energy demand. Our results show that the integration of PV systems on Airport Buildings in warm climates can supply the entire electric power consumption of an Airport complex, in line with the general concept of a zero-energy building (ZEB).

  • Solar Airports: A future multi-billion Euro PV market?
    Refocus, 2005
    Co-Authors: Ricardo Rüther, Priscila Braun
    Abstract:

    Airports are typically large, isolated, shade-free structures that are visited by millions of people every year presenting the perfect platform for PV both in terms of available solar resource and for awareness raising of the technology with the public. Ricardo Ruther and Priscila Braun present the case for PV integration on Airport Buildings and Airport grounds worldwide and argue that it could become a multi-billion euro market for solar PV.