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Albumin Antibody

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José Luis Santos – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • duration of breast feeding and bovine serum Albumin Antibody levels in type 1 diabetes a case control study
    Pediatric Diabetes, 2003
    Co-Authors: Francisco Perezbravo, Amaya Oyarzún, Elena Carrasco, C. Albala, Janice S. Dorman, José Luis Santos
    Abstract:

    : Objective:  To compare the levels of bovine serum Albumin (BSA) antibodies and their relationship with duration of breast feeding, age of exposure to cow’s milk, and human leukleukocyteiantigen (HLA-DQ) genotype in children with and without type 1 diabetes. Methods:  Serum samples from 143 (0.3–14.7 yr) newly diagnosed children with type 1 diabetes and 107 unrelated control children (0.8–13.5 yr) were evaluated for BSA antibodies. Duration of breast feeding and exposure to cow’s milk were recorded on questionnaires. HLA-DQ typing was determined by polymerase chain reaction. Results:  One hundred percent of the diabetic children were positive for BSA antibodies compared to 1.9% for healthy controls (p < 0.001). Diabetic children also had higher levels of immunoglobulin G antibodies than unrelated controls (55.1 vs. 17.8 ng/mL, p < 0.0001). Duration of breast feeding (5.4 vs. 7.6 months, p < 0.02), but not age of exposure to cow's milk (8.3 vs. 9.2 months, p = 0.11), differed between cases and controls. There was no difference in Antibody titer by duration of breast feeding or age of exposure to cow’s milk in the cases or controls. Conclusion:  Higher levels of antibodies to BSA were found in children recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes compared to the controls, particularly those with high or moderate HLA-DQ genotypes. The BSA profile, however, does not seem to depend on duration of breast feeding or age of exposure to cow’s milk in this population.

  • Duration of breast feeding and bovine serum Albumin Antibody levels in type 1 diabetes: a case-control study.
    Pediatric diabetes, 2003
    Co-Authors: Francisco Pérez-bravo, Amaya Oyarzún, Elena Carrasco, C. Albala, Janice S. Dorman, José Luis Santos
    Abstract:

    : Objective:  To compare the levels of bovine serum Albumin (BSA) antibodies and their relationship with duration of breast feeding, age of exposure to cow’s milk, and human leukleukocyteiantigen (HLA-DQ) genotype in children with and without type 1 diabetes. Methods:  Serum samples from 143 (0.3–14.7 yr) newly diagnosed children with type 1 diabetes and 107 unrelated control children (0.8–13.5 yr) were evaluated for BSA antibodies. Duration of breast feeding and exposure to cow’s milk were recorded on questionnaires. HLA-DQ typing was determined by polymerase chain reaction. Results:  One hundred percent of the diabetic children were positive for BSA antibodies compared to 1.9% for healthy controls (p 

Janice S. Dorman – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • duration of breast feeding and bovine serum Albumin Antibody levels in type 1 diabetes a case control study
    Pediatric Diabetes, 2003
    Co-Authors: Francisco Perezbravo, Amaya Oyarzún, Elena Carrasco, C. Albala, Janice S. Dorman, José Luis Santos
    Abstract:

    : Objective:  To compare the levels of bovine serum Albumin (BSA) antibodies and their relationship with duration of breast feeding, age of exposure to cow’s milk, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DQ) genotype in children with and without type 1 diabetes. Methods:  Serum samples from 143 (0.3–14.7 yr) newly diagnosed children with type 1 diabetes and 107 unrelated control children (0.8–13.5 yr) were evaluated for BSA antibodies. Duration of breast feeding and exposure to cow’s milk were recorded on questionnaires. HLA-DQ typing was determined by polymerase chain reaction. Results:  One hundred percent of the diabetic children were positive for BSA antibodies compared to 1.9% for healthy controls (p < 0.001). Diabetic children also had higher levels of immunoglobulin G antibodies than unrelated controls (55.1 vs. 17.8 ng/mL, p < 0.0001). Duration of breast feeding (5.4 vs. 7.6 months, p < 0.02), but not age of exposure to cow's milk (8.3 vs. 9.2 months, p = 0.11), differed between cases and controls. There was no difference in Antibody titer by duration of breast feeding or age of exposure to cow’s milk in the cases or controls. Conclusion:  Higher levels of antibodies to BSA were found in children recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes compared to the controls, particularly those with high or moderate HLA-DQ genotypes. The BSA profile, however, does not seem to depend on duration of breast feeding or age of exposure to cow’s milk in this population.

  • Duration of breast feeding and bovine serum Albumin Antibody levels in type 1 diabetes: a case-control study.
    Pediatric diabetes, 2003
    Co-Authors: Francisco Pérez-bravo, Amaya Oyarzún, Elena Carrasco, C. Albala, Janice S. Dorman, José Luis Santos
    Abstract:

    : Objective:  To compare the levels of bovine serum Albumin (BSA) antibodies and their relationship with duration of breast feeding, age of exposure to cow’s milk, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DQ) genotype in children with and without type 1 diabetes. Methods:  Serum samples from 143 (0.3–14.7 yr) newly diagnosed children with type 1 diabetes and 107 unrelated control children (0.8–13.5 yr) were evaluated for BSA antibodies. Duration of breast feeding and exposure to cow’s milk were recorded on questionnaires. HLA-DQ typing was determined by polymerase chain reaction. Results:  One hundred percent of the diabetic children were positive for BSA antibodies compared to 1.9% for healthy controls (p 

Elena Carrasco – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • duration of breast feeding and bovine serum Albumin Antibody levels in type 1 diabetes a case control study
    Pediatric Diabetes, 2003
    Co-Authors: Francisco Perezbravo, Amaya Oyarzún, Elena Carrasco, C. Albala, Janice S. Dorman, José Luis Santos
    Abstract:

    : Objective:  To compare the levels of bovine serum Albumin (BSA) antibodies and their relationship with duration of breast feeding, age of exposure to cow’s milk, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DQ) genotype in children with and without type 1 diabetes. Methods:  Serum samples from 143 (0.3–14.7 yr) newly diagnosed children with type 1 diabetes and 107 unrelated control children (0.8–13.5 yr) were evaluated for BSA antibodies. Duration of breast feeding and exposure to cow’s milk were recorded on questionnaires. HLA-DQ typing was determined by polymerase chain reaction. Results:  One hundred percent of the diabetic children were positive for BSA antibodies compared to 1.9% for healthy controls (p < 0.001). Diabetic children also had higher levels of immunoglobulin G antibodies than unrelated controls (55.1 vs. 17.8 ng/mL, p < 0.0001). Duration of breast feeding (5.4 vs. 7.6 months, p < 0.02), but not age of exposure to cow's milk (8.3 vs. 9.2 months, p = 0.11), differed between cases and controls. There was no difference in Antibody titer by duration of breast feeding or age of exposure to cow’s milk in the cases or controls. Conclusion:  Higher levels of antibodies to BSA were found in children recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes compared to the controls, particularly those with high or moderate HLA-DQ genotypes. The BSA profile, however, does not seem to depend on duration of breast feeding or age of exposure to cow’s milk in this population.

  • Duration of breast feeding and bovine serum Albumin Antibody levels in type 1 diabetes: a case-control study.
    Pediatric diabetes, 2003
    Co-Authors: Francisco Pérez-bravo, Amaya Oyarzún, Elena Carrasco, C. Albala, Janice S. Dorman, José Luis Santos
    Abstract:

    : Objective:  To compare the levels of bovine serum Albumin (BSA) antibodies and their relationship with duration of breast feeding, age of exposure to cow’s milk, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DQ) genotype in children with and without type 1 diabetes. Methods:  Serum samples from 143 (0.3–14.7 yr) newly diagnosed children with type 1 diabetes and 107 unrelated control children (0.8–13.5 yr) were evaluated for BSA antibodies. Duration of breast feeding and exposure to cow’s milk were recorded on questionnaires. HLA-DQ typing was determined by polymerase chain reaction. Results:  One hundred percent of the diabetic children were positive for BSA antibodies compared to 1.9% for healthy controls (p 

Amaya Oyarzún – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • duration of breast feeding and bovine serum Albumin Antibody levels in type 1 diabetes a case control study
    Pediatric Diabetes, 2003
    Co-Authors: Francisco Perezbravo, Amaya Oyarzún, Elena Carrasco, C. Albala, Janice S. Dorman, José Luis Santos
    Abstract:

    : Objective:  To compare the levels of bovine serum Albumin (BSA) antibodies and their relationship with duration of breast feeding, age of exposure to cow’s milk, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DQ) genotype in children with and without type 1 diabetes. Methods:  Serum samples from 143 (0.3–14.7 yr) newly diagnosed children with type 1 diabetes and 107 unrelated control children (0.8–13.5 yr) were evaluated for BSA antibodies. Duration of breast feeding and exposure to cow’s milk were recorded on questionnaires. HLA-DQ typing was determined by polymerase chain reaction. Results:  One hundred percent of the diabetic children were positive for BSA antibodies compared to 1.9% for healthy controls (p < 0.001). Diabetic children also had higher levels of immunoglobulin G antibodies than unrelated controls (55.1 vs. 17.8 ng/mL, p < 0.0001). Duration of breast feeding (5.4 vs. 7.6 months, p < 0.02), but not age of exposure to cow's milk (8.3 vs. 9.2 months, p = 0.11), differed between cases and controls. There was no difference in Antibody titer by duration of breast feeding or age of exposure to cow’s milk in the cases or controls. Conclusion:  Higher levels of antibodies to BSA were found in children recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes compared to the controls, particularly those with high or moderate HLA-DQ genotypes. The BSA profile, however, does not seem to depend on duration of breast feeding or age of exposure to cow’s milk in this population.

  • Duration of breast feeding and bovine serum Albumin Antibody levels in type 1 diabetes: a case-control study.
    Pediatric diabetes, 2003
    Co-Authors: Francisco Pérez-bravo, Amaya Oyarzún, Elena Carrasco, C. Albala, Janice S. Dorman, José Luis Santos
    Abstract:

    : Objective:  To compare the levels of bovine serum Albumin (BSA) antibodies and their relationship with duration of breast feeding, age of exposure to cow’s milk, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DQ) genotype in children with and without type 1 diabetes. Methods:  Serum samples from 143 (0.3–14.7 yr) newly diagnosed children with type 1 diabetes and 107 unrelated control children (0.8–13.5 yr) were evaluated for BSA antibodies. Duration of breast feeding and exposure to cow’s milk were recorded on questionnaires. HLA-DQ typing was determined by polymerase chain reaction. Results:  One hundred percent of the diabetic children were positive for BSA antibodies compared to 1.9% for healthy controls (p 

C. Albala – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • duration of breast feeding and bovine serum Albumin Antibody levels in type 1 diabetes a case control study
    Pediatric Diabetes, 2003
    Co-Authors: Francisco Perezbravo, Amaya Oyarzún, Elena Carrasco, C. Albala, Janice S. Dorman, José Luis Santos
    Abstract:

    : Objective:  To compare the levels of bovine serum Albumin (BSA) antibodies and their relationship with duration of breast feeding, age of exposure to cow’s milk, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DQ) genotype in children with and without type 1 diabetes. Methods:  Serum samples from 143 (0.3–14.7 yr) newly diagnosed children with type 1 diabetes and 107 unrelated control children (0.8–13.5 yr) were evaluated for BSA antibodies. Duration of breast feeding and exposure to cow’s milk were recorded on questionnaires. HLA-DQ typing was determined by polymerase chain reaction. Results:  One hundred percent of the diabetic children were positive for BSA antibodies compared to 1.9% for healthy controls (p < 0.001). Diabetic children also had higher levels of immunoglobulin G antibodies than unrelated controls (55.1 vs. 17.8 ng/mL, p < 0.0001). Duration of breast feeding (5.4 vs. 7.6 months, p < 0.02), but not age of exposure to cow's milk (8.3 vs. 9.2 months, p = 0.11), differed between cases and controls. There was no difference in Antibody titer by duration of breast feeding or age of exposure to cow’s milk in the cases or controls. Conclusion:  Higher levels of antibodies to BSA were found in children recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetes compared to the controls, particularly those with high or moderate HLA-DQ genotypes. The BSA profile, however, does not seem to depend on duration of breast feeding or age of exposure to cow’s milk in this population.

  • Duration of breast feeding and bovine serum Albumin Antibody levels in type 1 diabetes: a case-control study.
    Pediatric diabetes, 2003
    Co-Authors: Francisco Pérez-bravo, Amaya Oyarzún, Elena Carrasco, C. Albala, Janice S. Dorman, José Luis Santos
    Abstract:

    : Objective:  To compare the levels of bovine serum Albumin (BSA) antibodies and their relationship with duration of breast feeding, age of exposure to cow’s milk, and human leukocyte antigen (HLA-DQ) genotype in children with and without type 1 diabetes. Methods:  Serum samples from 143 (0.3–14.7 yr) newly diagnosed children with type 1 diabetes and 107 unrelated control children (0.8–13.5 yr) were evaluated for BSA antibodies. Duration of breast feeding and exposure to cow’s milk were recorded on questionnaires. HLA-DQ typing was determined by polymerase chain reaction. Results:  One hundred percent of the diabetic children were positive for BSA antibodies compared to 1.9% for healthy controls (p