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Alcohol Consumption

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Ke Xu – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • dna methylation signature on phosphatidylethanol not on self reported Alcohol Consumption predicts hazardous Alcohol Consumption in two distinct populations
    Molecular Psychiatry, 2020
    Co-Authors: Xiaoyu Liang, Amy C Justice, Kaku Soarmah, John H Krystal, Rajita Sinha, Ke Xu

    Abstract:

    The process of diagnosing hazardous Alcohol drinking (HAD) is based on self-reported data and is thereby vulnerable to bias. There has been an interest in developing epigenetic biomarkers for HAD that might complement clinical assessment. Because Alcohol Consumption has been previously linked to DNA methylation (DNAm), we aimed to select DNAm signatures in blood to predict HAD from two demographically and clinically distinct populations (Ntotal = 1,549). We first separately conducted an epigenome-wide association study (EWAS) for phosphatidylethanol (PEth), an objective measure of Alcohol Consumption, and for self-reported Alcohol Consumption in Cohort 1. We identified 83 PEth-associated CpGs, including 23 CpGs previously associated with Alcohol Consumption or Alcohol use disorder. In contrast, no CpG reached epigenome-wide significance on self-reported Alcohol Consumption. Using a machine learning approach, two CpG subsets from EWAS on PEth and on self-reported Alcohol Consumption from Cohort 1 were separately tested for the prediction of HAD in Cohort 2. We found that a subset of 143 CpGs selected from the EWAS on PEth showed an excellent prediction of HAD with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 89.4% in training set and 73.9% in validation set of Cohort 2. However, CpGs preselected from the EWAS on self-reported Alcohol Consumption showed a poor prediction of HAD with AUC 75.2% in training set and 57.6% in validation set. Our results demonstrate that an objective measure for Alcohol Consumption is a more informative phenotype than self-reported data for revealing epigenetic mechanisms. The PEth-associated DNAm signature in blood could serve as a robust biomarker for Alcohol Consumption.

  • dna methylation signature on phosphatidylethanol not self reported Alcohol Consumption predicts hazardous Alcohol Consumption in two distinct populations
    bioRxiv, 2019
    Co-Authors: Xiaoyu Liang, Amy C Justice, Kaku Soarmah, John H Krystal, Rajita Sinha, Ke Xu

    Abstract:

    ABSTRACT The process of diagnosing hazardous Alcohol drinking (HAD) is based on self-reported data and is thereby vulnerable to bias. There has been an interest in developing epigenetic biomarkers for HAD that might complement clinical assessment. Because Alcohol Consumption has been previously linked to DNA methylation (DNAm), here, we aimed to select DNAm signatures in blood to predict HAD from two demographically and clinically distinct populations (Ntotal=1,549). We first separately conducted an epigenome-wide association study (EWAS) for phosphatidylethanol (PEth), an objective measure of Alcohol Consumption, and for self-reported Alcohol Consumption in Cohort 1. We identified 102 PEth-associated CpGs, including 32 CpGs previously associated with Alcohol Consumption or Alcohol use disorders. In contrast, no CpG reached epigenome-wide significance on self-reported Alcohol Consumption. Using a machine learning approach, two subsets of CpGs from EWAS on PEth and on self-reported Alcohol Consumption from Cohort 1 were separately tested for the prediction of HAD in Cohort 2. We found that a subset of 130 CpGs selected from the EWAS on PEth showed an excellent prediction of HAD with area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 91.31% in training set and 70.65% in validation set of Cohort 2. However, CpGs preselected from the EWAS on self-reported Alcohol Consumption showed a poor prediction of HAD with AUC 75.18% in the training set and 57.60% in the validation set. Our results demonstrate that an objective measure for Alcohol Consumption is a more informative phenotype than self-reported data for revealing epigenetic mechanism. The PEth-associated DNAm signature in blood is a robust biomarker for Alcohol Consumption.

Xiaoyu Liang – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • dna methylation signature on phosphatidylethanol not on self reported Alcohol Consumption predicts hazardous Alcohol Consumption in two distinct populations
    Molecular Psychiatry, 2020
    Co-Authors: Xiaoyu Liang, Amy C Justice, Kaku Soarmah, John H Krystal, Rajita Sinha, Ke Xu

    Abstract:

    The process of diagnosing hazardous Alcohol drinking (HAD) is based on self-reported data and is thereby vulnerable to bias. There has been an interest in developing epigenetic biomarkers for HAD that might complement clinical assessment. Because Alcohol Consumption has been previously linked to DNA methylation (DNAm), we aimed to select DNAm signatures in blood to predict HAD from two demographically and clinically distinct populations (Ntotal = 1,549). We first separately conducted an epigenome-wide association study (EWAS) for phosphatidylethanol (PEth), an objective measure of Alcohol Consumption, and for self-reported Alcohol Consumption in Cohort 1. We identified 83 PEth-associated CpGs, including 23 CpGs previously associated with Alcohol Consumption or Alcohol use disorder. In contrast, no CpG reached epigenome-wide significance on self-reported Alcohol Consumption. Using a machine learning approach, two CpG subsets from EWAS on PEth and on self-reported Alcohol Consumption from Cohort 1 were separately tested for the prediction of HAD in Cohort 2. We found that a subset of 143 CpGs selected from the EWAS on PEth showed an excellent prediction of HAD with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 89.4% in training set and 73.9% in validation set of Cohort 2. However, CpGs preselected from the EWAS on self-reported Alcohol Consumption showed a poor prediction of HAD with AUC 75.2% in training set and 57.6% in validation set. Our results demonstrate that an objective measure for Alcohol Consumption is a more informative phenotype than self-reported data for revealing epigenetic mechanisms. The PEth-associated DNAm signature in blood could serve as a robust biomarker for Alcohol Consumption.

  • dna methylation signature on phosphatidylethanol not self reported Alcohol Consumption predicts hazardous Alcohol Consumption in two distinct populations
    bioRxiv, 2019
    Co-Authors: Xiaoyu Liang, Amy C Justice, Kaku Soarmah, John H Krystal, Rajita Sinha, Ke Xu

    Abstract:

    ABSTRACT The process of diagnosing hazardous Alcohol drinking (HAD) is based on self-reported data and is thereby vulnerable to bias. There has been an interest in developing epigenetic biomarkers for HAD that might complement clinical assessment. Because Alcohol Consumption has been previously linked to DNA methylation (DNAm), here, we aimed to select DNAm signatures in blood to predict HAD from two demographically and clinically distinct populations (Ntotal=1,549). We first separately conducted an epigenome-wide association study (EWAS) for phosphatidylethanol (PEth), an objective measure of Alcohol Consumption, and for self-reported Alcohol Consumption in Cohort 1. We identified 102 PEth-associated CpGs, including 32 CpGs previously associated with Alcohol Consumption or Alcohol use disorders. In contrast, no CpG reached epigenome-wide significance on self-reported Alcohol Consumption. Using a machine learning approach, two subsets of CpGs from EWAS on PEth and on self-reported Alcohol Consumption from Cohort 1 were separately tested for the prediction of HAD in Cohort 2. We found that a subset of 130 CpGs selected from the EWAS on PEth showed an excellent prediction of HAD with area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 91.31% in training set and 70.65% in validation set of Cohort 2. However, CpGs preselected from the EWAS on self-reported Alcohol Consumption showed a poor prediction of HAD with AUC 75.18% in the training set and 57.60% in the validation set. Our results demonstrate that an objective measure for Alcohol Consumption is a more informative phenotype than self-reported data for revealing epigenetic mechanism. The PEth-associated DNAm signature in blood is a robust biomarker for Alcohol Consumption.

Rajita Sinha – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • dna methylation signature on phosphatidylethanol not on self reported Alcohol Consumption predicts hazardous Alcohol Consumption in two distinct populations
    Molecular Psychiatry, 2020
    Co-Authors: Xiaoyu Liang, Amy C Justice, Kaku Soarmah, John H Krystal, Rajita Sinha, Ke Xu

    Abstract:

    The process of diagnosing hazardous Alcohol drinking (HAD) is based on self-reported data and is thereby vulnerable to bias. There has been an interest in developing epigenetic biomarkers for HAD that might complement clinical assessment. Because Alcohol Consumption has been previously linked to DNA methylation (DNAm), we aimed to select DNAm signatures in blood to predict HAD from two demographically and clinically distinct populations (Ntotal = 1,549). We first separately conducted an epigenome-wide association study (EWAS) for phosphatidylethanol (PEth), an objective measure of Alcohol Consumption, and for self-reported Alcohol Consumption in Cohort 1. We identified 83 PEth-associated CpGs, including 23 CpGs previously associated with Alcohol Consumption or Alcohol use disorder. In contrast, no CpG reached epigenome-wide significance on self-reported Alcohol Consumption. Using a machine learning approach, two CpG subsets from EWAS on PEth and on self-reported Alcohol Consumption from Cohort 1 were separately tested for the prediction of HAD in Cohort 2. We found that a subset of 143 CpGs selected from the EWAS on PEth showed an excellent prediction of HAD with the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (AUC) of 89.4% in training set and 73.9% in validation set of Cohort 2. However, CpGs preselected from the EWAS on self-reported Alcohol Consumption showed a poor prediction of HAD with AUC 75.2% in training set and 57.6% in validation set. Our results demonstrate that an objective measure for Alcohol Consumption is a more informative phenotype than self-reported data for revealing epigenetic mechanisms. The PEth-associated DNAm signature in blood could serve as a robust biomarker for Alcohol Consumption.

  • dna methylation signature on phosphatidylethanol not self reported Alcohol Consumption predicts hazardous Alcohol Consumption in two distinct populations
    bioRxiv, 2019
    Co-Authors: Xiaoyu Liang, Amy C Justice, Kaku Soarmah, John H Krystal, Rajita Sinha, Ke Xu

    Abstract:

    ABSTRACT The process of diagnosing hazardous Alcohol drinking (HAD) is based on self-reported data and is thereby vulnerable to bias. There has been an interest in developing epigenetic biomarkers for HAD that might complement clinical assessment. Because Alcohol Consumption has been previously linked to DNA methylation (DNAm), here, we aimed to select DNAm signatures in blood to predict HAD from two demographically and clinically distinct populations (Ntotal=1,549). We first separately conducted an epigenome-wide association study (EWAS) for phosphatidylethanol (PEth), an objective measure of Alcohol Consumption, and for self-reported Alcohol Consumption in Cohort 1. We identified 102 PEth-associated CpGs, including 32 CpGs previously associated with Alcohol Consumption or Alcohol use disorders. In contrast, no CpG reached epigenome-wide significance on self-reported Alcohol Consumption. Using a machine learning approach, two subsets of CpGs from EWAS on PEth and on self-reported Alcohol Consumption from Cohort 1 were separately tested for the prediction of HAD in Cohort 2. We found that a subset of 130 CpGs selected from the EWAS on PEth showed an excellent prediction of HAD with area under the ROC curve (AUC) of 91.31% in training set and 70.65% in validation set of Cohort 2. However, CpGs preselected from the EWAS on self-reported Alcohol Consumption showed a poor prediction of HAD with AUC 75.18% in the training set and 57.60% in the validation set. Our results demonstrate that an objective measure for Alcohol Consumption is a more informative phenotype than self-reported data for revealing epigenetic mechanism. The PEth-associated DNAm signature in blood is a robust biomarker for Alcohol Consumption.