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Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome

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Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Giovanni Addolorato – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Identification and Management of Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome
    Drugs, 2015
    Co-Authors: Antonio Mirijello, Cristina D’angelo, Anna Ferrulli, Gabriele Vassallo, Mariangela Antonelli, Fabio Caputo, Lorenzo Leggio, Antonio Gasbarrini, Giovanni Addolorato

    Abstract:

    Symptoms of Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome (AWS) may develop within 6–24 h after the abrupt discontinuation or decrease of Alcohol consumption. Symptoms can vary from autonomic hyperactivity and agitation to delirium tremens. The gold-standard treatment for AWS is with benzodiazepines (BZDs). Among the BZDs, different agents (i.e., long-acting or short-acting) and different regimens (front-loading, fixed-dose or symptom-triggered) may be chosen on the basis of patient characteristics. Severe Withdrawal could require ICU admission and the use of barbiturates or propofol. Other drugs, such as α_2-agonists (clonidine and dexmetedomidine) and β-blockers can be used as adjunctive treatments to control neuroautonomic hyperactivity. Furthermore, neuroleptic agents can help control hallucinations. Finally, other medications for the treatment for AWS have been investigated with promising results. These include carbamazepine, valproate, sodium oxybate, baclofen, gabapentin and topiramate. The usefulness of these agents are discussed.

  • Sodium oxybate in the treatment of Alcohol dependence: from the Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome to the Alcohol relapse prevention
    Expert opinion on pharmacotherapy, 2013
    Co-Authors: Katrin Skala, Antonio Mirijello, Anna Ferrulli, Mariangela Antonelli, Fabio Caputo, Gabriele A. Vassallo, Henriette Walter, Otto M. Lesch, Giovanni Addolorato

    Abstract:

    Introduction: Sodium oxybate (SMO) has been shown to be safe and effective in the treatment of patients with Alcohol use disorders (AUDs); it was approved in Italy and Austria for the treatment of Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome and for relapse prevention. The focus of this review is to discuss the clinical evidence on the therapeutic potential of SMO for AUDs. Areas covered: This review covers the studies in patients with Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome who received SMO for the treatment of Withdrawal symptoms and the studies in patients with AUDs who received SMO to achieve total Alcohol abstinence, reduction of Alcohol intake, and relapse prevention. Relevant medical literature on SMO was identified by searching databases including MEDLINE and EMBASE (searches last updated 20 September 2013), bibliographies from published literature, clinical trial registries/databases, and websites. Expert opinion: SMO has proved safe and effective in the treatment of Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome and in the prevention of relap…

  • rapid suppression of Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome by baclofen
    The American Journal of Medicine, 2002
    Co-Authors: Giovanni Addolorato, Fabio Caputo, Esmeralda Capristo, Luigi Janiri, Maria De Bernardi, Roberta Agabio, Giancarlo Colombo, Gian Luigi Gessa, Giovanni Gasbarrini

    Abstract:

    Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome is a distressing and at times life-threatening condition in Alcohol-dependent patients (1). Usually, symptoms develop within 6 –24 hours after the last drink (2). Early symptoms include raised blood pressure and pulse rate, tremor, hyperreflexia, and anxiety with increased irritability. Clinical management is aimed at symptom relief, prevention of seizures and delirium, and a smooth transition to a treatment program to maintain long-term abstinence from Alcohol (3). Benzodiazepines are presently the drug of choice (4). We recently found that baclofen, a -aminobutyric acid (GABA)B receptor agonist used to control spasticity (5), reduced voluntary Alcohol intake in Alcohol-preferring rats (6), as well as Alcohol craving and intake, up to complete Alcohol abstinence, in Alcohol-dependent patients (7). Furthermore, baclofen suppressed the intensity of Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome in rats who were physically dependent on Alcohol (6). We therefore studied the effects of oral administration of baclofen in patients with severe Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome.

Andrew J. Mcbride – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • A COMPARISON OF RATING SCALES FOR THE AlcoholWithdrawal Syndrome
    Alcohol and Alcoholism, 2001
    Co-Authors: David Williams, Julia Lewis, Andrew J. Mcbride

    Abstract:

    — This paper reviews the literature on the use of rating scales within the treatment of the AlcoholWithdrawal Syndrome. A computer-assisted literature search identified trials of therapy for and rating scales used in AlcoholWithdrawal states. Eighteen rating scales were identified. There is a wide variation in symptom items included in these scales. Scales also vary in their length and ease of application. We conclude that it is important to use validated and reliable assessment scales in research if proper comparisons of treatments for the AlcoholWithdrawal Syndrome are to be made.

Antonio Mirijello – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Identification and Management of Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome
    Drugs, 2015
    Co-Authors: Antonio Mirijello, Cristina D’angelo, Anna Ferrulli, Gabriele Vassallo, Mariangela Antonelli, Fabio Caputo, Lorenzo Leggio, Antonio Gasbarrini, Giovanni Addolorato

    Abstract:

    Symptoms of Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome (AWS) may develop within 6–24 h after the abrupt discontinuation or decrease of Alcohol consumption. Symptoms can vary from autonomic hyperactivity and agitation to delirium tremens. The gold-standard treatment for AWS is with benzodiazepines (BZDs). Among the BZDs, different agents (i.e., long-acting or short-acting) and different regimens (front-loading, fixed-dose or symptom-triggered) may be chosen on the basis of patient characteristics. Severe Withdrawal could require ICU admission and the use of barbiturates or propofol. Other drugs, such as α_2-agonists (clonidine and dexmetedomidine) and β-blockers can be used as adjunctive treatments to control neuroautonomic hyperactivity. Furthermore, neuroleptic agents can help control hallucinations. Finally, other medications for the treatment for AWS have been investigated with promising results. These include carbamazepine, valproate, sodium oxybate, baclofen, gabapentin and topiramate. The usefulness of these agents are discussed.

  • Sodium oxybate in the treatment of Alcohol dependence: from the Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome to the Alcohol relapse prevention
    Expert opinion on pharmacotherapy, 2013
    Co-Authors: Katrin Skala, Antonio Mirijello, Anna Ferrulli, Mariangela Antonelli, Fabio Caputo, Gabriele A. Vassallo, Henriette Walter, Otto M. Lesch, Giovanni Addolorato

    Abstract:

    Introduction: Sodium oxybate (SMO) has been shown to be safe and effective in the treatment of patients with Alcohol use disorders (AUDs); it was approved in Italy and Austria for the treatment of Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome and for relapse prevention. The focus of this review is to discuss the clinical evidence on the therapeutic potential of SMO for AUDs. Areas covered: This review covers the studies in patients with Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome who received SMO for the treatment of Withdrawal symptoms and the studies in patients with AUDs who received SMO to achieve total Alcohol abstinence, reduction of Alcohol intake, and relapse prevention. Relevant medical literature on SMO was identified by searching databases including MEDLINE and EMBASE (searches last updated 20 September 2013), bibliographies from published literature, clinical trial registries/databases, and websites. Expert opinion: SMO has proved safe and effective in the treatment of Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome and in the prevention of relap…