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Maria M. Corrada – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • non Alcoholic Beverage and caffeine consumption and mortality the leisure world cohort study
    Preventive Medicine, 2007
    Co-Authors: Annlia Paganinihill, Claudia H. Kawas, Maria M. Corrada
    Abstract:

    Objective. To examine the effects of non-Alcoholic Beverage and caffeine consumption on all-cause mortality in older adults. Methods. The Leisure World Cohort Study is a prospective study of residents of a California retirement community. A baseline postal health survey included details on coffee, tea, milk, soft drink, and chocolate consumption. Participants were followed for 23 years (1981–2004). Risk ratios (RRs) of death were calculated using Cox regression for 8644 women and 4980 men (median age at entry, 74 years) and adjusted for age, gender, and multiple potential confounders. Results. Caffeine consumption exhibited a U-shaped mortality curve. Moderate caffeine consumers had a significantly reduced risk of death (multivariable-adjusted RR = 0.94, 95% CI: 0.89, 0.99 for 100–199 mg/day and RR = 0.90, 95% CI: 0.85, 0.94 for 200–399 mg/day compared with those consuming < 50 mg/day). Individuals who drank more than 1 can/week of artificially sweetened (but not sugar-sweetened) soft drink (cola and other) had an 8% increased risk (95% CI: 1.01–1.16). Neither milk nor tea had a significant effect on mortality after multivariable adjustment. Conclusions. Moderate caffeine consumption appeared beneficial in reducing risk of death. Attenuation in the observed associations between mortality and intake of tea and milk with adjustment for potential confounders suggests that such consumption identifies those with other mortality-associated lifestyle and health risks. The increased death risk with consumption of artificially sweetened, but not sugar-sweetened, soft drinks suggests an effect of the sweetener rather than other components of the soft drinks, although residual confounding remains a possibility.

  • non Alcoholic Beverage and caffeine consumption and mortality the leisure world cohort study
    Preventive Medicine, 2007
    Co-Authors: Annlia Paganinihill, Claudia H. Kawas, Maria M. Corrada
    Abstract:

    To examine the effects of non-Alcoholic Beverage and caffeine consumption on all-cause mortality in older adults.The Leisure World Cohort Study is a prospective study of residents of a California retirement community. A baseline postal health survey included details on coffee, tea, milk, soft drink, and chocolate consumption. Participants were followed for 23 years (1981-2004). Risk ratios (RRs) of death were calculated using Cox regression for 8644 women and 4980 men (median age at entry, 74 years) and adjusted for age, gender, and multiple potential confounders.Caffeine consumption exhibited a U-shaped mortality curve. Moderate caffeine consumers had a significantly reduced risk of death (multivariable-adjusted RR=0.94, 95% CI: 0.89, 0.99 for 100-199 mg/day and RR=0.90, 95% CI: 0.85, 0.94 for 200-399 mg/day compared with those consuming <50 mg/day). Individuals who drank more than 1 can/week of artificially sweetened (but not sugar-sweetened) soft drink (cola and other) had an 8% increased risk (95% CI: 1.01-1.16). Neither milk nor tea had a significant effect on mortality after multivariable adjustment.Moderate caffeine consumption appeared beneficial in reducing risk of death. Attenuation in the observed associations between mortality and intake of tea and milk with adjustment for potential confounders suggests that such consumption identifies those with other mortality-associated lifestyle and health risks. The increased death risk with consumption of artificially sweetened, but not sugar-sweetened, soft drinks suggests an effect of the sweetener rather than other components of the soft drinks, although residual confounding remains a possibility.

  • Non-Alcoholic Beverage and caffeine consumption and mortality: the Leisure World Cohort Study
    Preventive medicine, 2006
    Co-Authors: Annlia Paganini-hill, Claudia H. Kawas, Maria M. Corrada
    Abstract:

    To examine the effects of non-Alcoholic Beverage and caffeine consumption on all-cause mortality in older adults.The Leisure World Cohort Study is a prospective study of residents of a California retirement community. A baseline postal health survey included details on coffee, tea, milk, soft drink, and chocolate consumption. Participants were followed for 23 years (1981-2004). Risk ratios (RRs) of death were calculated using Cox regression for 8644 women and 4980 men (median age at entry, 74 years) and adjusted for age, gender, and multiple potential confounders.Caffeine consumption exhibited a U-shaped mortality curve. Moderate caffeine consumers had a significantly reduced risk of death (multivariable-adjusted RR=0.94, 95% CI: 0.89, 0.99 for 100-199 mg/day and RR=0.90, 95% CI: 0.85, 0.94 for 200-399 mg/day compared with those consuming

Shaoquan Liu – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

Larry D. Reid – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Combination of naltrexone and fluoxetine on rats’ propensity to take Alcoholic Beverage.
    Alcoholism: Clinical and Experimental Research, 1997
    Co-Authors: Luis R. Gardell, Christopher L. Hubbell, Christine A. Whalen, Soma Chattophadyay, Colleen A. Cavallaro, Larry D. Reid
    Abstract:

    : Naltrexone (NTX) and fluoxetine (FLU) are useful for treating alcoholism and depression, respectively. Furthermore, these afflictions covary. Given the possibility that people might be prescribed NTX and FLU concurrently, we assessed the effects of these two agents on rats’ propensity to drink an Alcoholic Beverage. Rats were given 65 days of access to a sweetened Alcoholic Beverage and water for 2 hr daily. At first, they took little ethanol, but after 20 days, they took on average 2.0 to 2.5 g/kg of ethanol, daily during the 2-hr session. They also took sufficient water to maintain their health. After 30 days, they were divided into four groups to receive, 30 min before the drinking session, 1 of 4 different kinds of injections. For the next 20 days, one group received placebo daily. Another group received 5 mg/kg of NTX daily and another 5 mg/kg of FLU daily. The fourth group received both 5 mg/kg of NTX and 5 mg/kg of FLU daily. After 20 days, the doses of NTX and FLU were doubled across an additional 10 days. Both NTX and FLU reduced rats’ intake of Alcoholic Beverage. The combinations of NTX and FLU, however, were no more effective in reducing rats’ intake of Alcoholic Beverage than either alone. Also, the small dose of NTX seemed to lose its effectiveness with repeated administrations. A second experiment confirmed the conclusion that small doses of NTX lose their effectiveness in suppressing intake of Alcoholic Beverage across repeated administrations. In summary, data provide no support for the idea that FLU and NTX would act synergistically to reduce propensity to take Alcoholic Beverages.

  • Combination of Naltrexone and Fluoxetine on Rats’Propensity to Take Alcoholic Beverage
    Alcoholism clinical and experimental research, 1997
    Co-Authors: Luis R. Gardell, Christopher L. Hubbell, Christine A. Whalen, Soma Chattophadyay, Colleen A. Cavallaro, Larry D. Reid
    Abstract:

    Naltrexone (NTX) and fluoxetine (FLU) are useful for treating alcoholism and depression, respectively. Furthermore, these afflictions covary. Given the possibility that people might be prescribed NTX and FLU concurrently, we assessed the effects of these two agents on rats’ propensity to drink an Alcoholic Beverage. Rats were given 65 days of access to a sweetened Alcoholic Beverage and water for 2 hr daily. At first, they took little ethanol, but after 20 days, they took on average 2.0 to 2.5 g/kg of ethanol, daily during the 2-hr session. They also took sufficient water to maintain their health. After 30 days, they were divided into four groups to receive, 30 min before the drinking session, 1 of 4 different kinds of injections. For the next 20 days, one group received placebo daily. Another group received 5 mg/kg of NTX daily and another 5 mg/kg of FLU daily. The fourth group received both 5 mg/kg of NTX and 5 mg/kg of FLU daily. After 20 days, the doses of NTX and FLU were doubled across an additional 10 days. Both NTX and FLU reduced rats’ intake of Alcoholic Beverage. The combinations of NTX and FLU, however, were no more effective in reducing rats’ intake of Alcoholic Beverage than either alone. Also, the small dose of NTX seemed to lose its effectiveness with repeated administrations. A second experiment confirmed the conclusion that small doses of NTX lose their effectiveness in suppressing intake of Alcoholic Beverage across repeated administrations. In summary, data provide no support for the idea that FLU and NTX would act synergistically to reduce propensity to take Alcoholic Beverages.

  • Mianserin, a Serotonergic Antagonist, and Intake of an Alcoholic Beverage
    Novel Pharmacological Interventions for Alcoholism, 1992
    Co-Authors: Edward J. Bilsky, John D. Delconte, Christopher L. Hubbell, Larry D. Reid
    Abstract:

    There is evidence showing that manipulations of serotonergic systems affect ingestion. In general, agents enhancing serotonergic activity decrease ingestion, while serotonergic antagonists block this effect and, by themselves, appear to potentiate ingestion [1,2,3,4,5,6,7,8,9]. In addition, there are a number of reports that enhanced serotonergic activity reduces intake of ethanol (E) [10,11,12,13,14,15]. If serotonergic systems are saliently related to propensity to take E, and if increases in serotonergic activity decrease intake, then it is reasonable to predict that decreases (or antagonism) in serotonergic activity should enhance intake of Alcoholic Beverages. In the present study, we assessed the effects of mianserin, a general serotonergic antagonist, across a range of doses, on rats’ intakes of a sweetened Alcoholic Beverage.

Nicole Jankovic – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Alcoholic Beverage preference and diabetes incidence across europe the consortium on health and ageing network of cohorts in europe and the united states chances project
    European Journal of Clinical Nutrition, 2017
    Co-Authors: Diewertje Sluik, Nicole Jankovic, Maria Hughes, Mark G Odoherty, Ben Schottker, Wojciech Drygas, Olov Rolandsson, Satu Mannisto, Jose M Ordonezmena
    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND/OBJECTIVES: It is unknown if wine, beer and spirit intake lead to a similar association with diabetes. We studied the association between Alcoholic Beverage preference and type 2 diabete …

  • Alcoholic Beverage preference and dietary habits in elderly across europe analyses within the consortium on health and ageing network of cohorts in europe and the united states chances project
    PLOS ONE, 2016
    Co-Authors: Diewertje Sluik, Nicole Jankovic, Mark G Odoherty, Ben Schottker, Olov Rolandsson, Anouk Geelen, Jessica Kieftede C Jong, Jean Ferrieres
    Abstract:

    INTRODUCTION: The differential associations of beer, wine, and spirit consumption on cardiovascular risk found in observational studies may be confounded by diet. We described and compared dietary intake and diet quality according to Alcoholic Beverage preference in European elderly. METHODS: From the Consortium on Health and Ageing: Network of Cohorts in Europe and the United States (CHANCES), seven European cohorts were included, i.e. four sub-cohorts from EPIC-Elderly, the SENECA Study, the Zutphen Elderly Study, and the Rotterdam Study. Harmonized data of 29,423 elderly participants from 14 European countries were analyzed. Baseline data on consumption of beer, wine, and spirits, and dietary intake were collected with questionnaires. Diet quality was assessed using the Healthy Diet Indicator (HDI). Intakes and scores across categories of Alcoholic Beverage preference (beer, wine, spirit, no preference, non-consumers) were adjusted for age, sex, socio-economic status, self-reported prevalent diseases, and lifestyle factors. Cohort-specific mean intakes and scores were calculated as well as weighted means combining all cohorts. RESULTS: In 5 of 7 cohorts, persons with a wine preference formed the largest group. After multivariate adjustment, persons with a wine preference tended to have a higher HDI score and intake of healthy foods in most cohorts, but differences were small. The weighted estimates of all cohorts combined revealed that non-consumers had the highest fruit and vegetable intake, followed by wine consumers. Non-consumers and persons with no specific preference had a higher HDI score, spirit consumers the lowest. However, overall diet quality as measured by HDI did not differ greatly across Alcoholic Beverage preference categories. DISCUSSION: This study using harmonized data from ~30,000 elderly from 14 European countries showed that, after multivariate adjustment, dietary habits and diet quality did not differ greatly according to Alcoholic Beverage preference.

Jianyong Chua – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • evaluation of five commercial non saccharomyces yeasts in fermentation of soy tofu whey into an Alcoholic Beverage
    Food Microbiology, 2018
    Co-Authors: Jianyong Chua, Shaoquan Liu
    Abstract:

    Abstract Soy (tofu) whey is a nutritious liquid substrate that is often discarded by tofu manufacturers. Recent research has shown that tofu whey can be converted into a soy Alcoholic Beverage using Saccharomyces yeasts. In this study, five commercially available non-Saccharomyces yeasts (Torulaspora delbrueckii; Lachancea thermotolerans; Metschnikowia pulcherrima; Pichia kluyveri and Williopsis saturnus) were evaluated in tofu whey fermentation and each of the yeasts showed different growth kinetics and fermentation performance. T. delbrueckii and L. thermotolerans consumed the supplemented sucrose and produced 6–7% (v/v) ethanol, while M. pulcherrima, P. kluyveri and W. saturnus only utilized the endogenous fructose and glucose, producing trace levels of ethanol. Besides, different yeasts showed different β-glucosidase activities with 22–97% reduction in isoflavone glucosides; T. delbrueckii, L. thermotolerans and W. saturnus also decreased the level of GABA in tofu whey. Endogenous volatile compounds (mainly short-chain aldehydes) in tofu whey were reduced to trace levels, but different volatile compounds were produced by different yeasts at varying levels that can contribute to the different aroma profiles of the Beverages. Therefore, selection of appropriate non-Saccharomyces yeasts can serve as a new strategy to valorize tofu whey and alter the aroma profile of the Beverage.

  • biotransformation of soy whey into soy Alcoholic Beverage by four commercial strains of saccharomyces cerevisiae
    International Journal of Food Microbiology, 2017
    Co-Authors: Jianyong Chua, Shaoquan Liu
    Abstract:

    Abstract Soy whey is a liquid waste stream generated from tofu and soy protein manufacturing, and is commonly disposed of into the drainage system in food industry. Instead of disposing of soy whey as a waste, it could be used to produce Alcoholic Beverages. This study investigated the feasibility of converting soy whey into soy Alcoholic Beverage using four commercial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains as a zero-waste approach to tackle the soy whey disposal issue. The four Saccharomyces yeasts grew by approximately 2 log CFU/mL and produced approximately 7–8% (v/v) of ethanol. Isoflavone glucosides were hydrolyzed and transformed into isoflavone aglycones, increasing the antioxidant capacity. New aroma-active volatiles, especially esters and higher alcohols, were produced and imparted fruity and floral notes to the soy Alcoholic Beverage. Therefore, Alcoholic fermentation would serve as a solution toward zero-waste manufacturing by biotransforming soy whey into a world’s first novel functional Alcoholic Beverage naturally enriched with free isoflavones.