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Zongyong Jiang – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • growth performance carcass traits and meat quality of yellow feathered broilers fed graded levels of Alfalfa Meal with or without wheat
    Animal Science Journal, 2018
    Co-Authors: Shouqun Jiang, Zhongyong Gou, Xiajing Lin, Zongyong Jiang
    Abstract:

    The effects of 0, 40 and 80 g/kg Alfalfa Meal on growth performance, carcass traits and meat quality of Chinese yellow-feathered broilers fed diets containing or lacking wheat (0 or 200 g/kg) as part of the energy source, were examined using random design with a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement of treatments. Dressing percentage and semi-eviscerated proportion were lower, and meat color a* (redness) value was higher in birds fed diets containing wheat than diets lacking wheat (P < 0.05). Drip loss was reduced by the addition of Alfalfa Meal to diets containing or lacking wheat (P < 0.05). Average sensory score of breast meat was higher in chickens fed corn-based diets than in those fed wheat (P < 0.05). Meat from those supplemented with 40 g/kg Alfalfa Meal had better taste than the other two levels (P < 0.05). The inclusion of wheat significantly reduced the activities of creatine kinase and calpain of breast muscle (P < 0.05). In conclusion, Chinese yellow-feathered broilers fed diets containing wheat had better meat color and lower drip loss than those fed the diets without wheat, and adding 40 g/kg Alfalfa Meal generally improved meat quality and taste.

  • Growth performance, carcass traits and meat quality of yellow-feathered broilers fed graded levels of Alfalfa Meal with or without wheat.
    Animal science journal = Nihon chikusan Gakkaiho, 2017
    Co-Authors: Shouqun Jiang, Zhongyong Gou, Xiajing Lin, Zongyong Jiang
    Abstract:

    The effects of 0, 40 and 80 g/kg Alfalfa Meal on growth performance, carcass traits and meat quality of Chinese yellow-feathered broilers fed diets containing or lacking wheat (0 or 200 g/kg) as part of the energy source, were examined using random design with a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement of treatments. Dressing percentage and semi-eviscerated proportion were lower, and meat color a* (redness) value was higher in birds fed diets containing wheat than diets lacking wheat (P 

Shouqun Jiang – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • growth performance carcass traits and meat quality of yellow feathered broilers fed graded levels of Alfalfa Meal with or without wheat
    Animal Science Journal, 2018
    Co-Authors: Shouqun Jiang, Zhongyong Gou, Xiajing Lin, Zongyong Jiang
    Abstract:

    The effects of 0, 40 and 80 g/kg Alfalfa Meal on growth performance, carcass traits and meat quality of Chinese yellow-feathered broilers fed diets containing or lacking wheat (0 or 200 g/kg) as part of the energy source, were examined using random design with a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement of treatments. Dressing percentage and semi-eviscerated proportion were lower, and meat color a* (redness) value was higher in birds fed diets containing wheat than diets lacking wheat (P < 0.05). Drip loss was reduced by the addition of Alfalfa Meal to diets containing or lacking wheat (P < 0.05). Average sensory score of breast meat was higher in chickens fed corn-based diets than in those fed wheat (P < 0.05). Meat from those supplemented with 40 g/kg Alfalfa Meal had better taste than the other two levels (P < 0.05). The inclusion of wheat significantly reduced the activities of creatine kinase and calpain of breast muscle (P < 0.05). In conclusion, Chinese yellow-feathered broilers fed diets containing wheat had better meat color and lower drip loss than those fed the diets without wheat, and adding 40 g/kg Alfalfa Meal generally improved meat quality and taste.

  • Growth performance, carcass traits and meat quality of yellow-feathered broilers fed graded levels of Alfalfa Meal with or without wheat.
    Animal science journal = Nihon chikusan Gakkaiho, 2017
    Co-Authors: Shouqun Jiang, Zhongyong Gou, Xiajing Lin, Zongyong Jiang
    Abstract:

    The effects of 0, 40 and 80 g/kg Alfalfa Meal on growth performance, carcass traits and meat quality of Chinese yellow-feathered broilers fed diets containing or lacking wheat (0 or 200 g/kg) as part of the energy source, were examined using random design with a 2 × 3 factorial arrangement of treatments. Dressing percentage and semi-eviscerated proportion were lower, and meat color a* (redness) value was higher in birds fed diets containing wheat than diets lacking wheat (P 

Leon F. Kubena – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Organ weight and serum triglyceride responses of older (80 week) commercial laying hens fed an Alfalfa Meal molt diet.
    Bioresource technology, 2007
    Co-Authors: K.l. Landers, Leon F. Kubena, R.w. Moore, P Herrera, D.a. Landers, Z.r. Howard, Jeffrey Lynn Mcreynolds, J.a. Bryd, D. J. Nisbet, S.c. Ricke
    Abstract:

    Since one of the costs in the commercial egg industry is that of replacement pullets, commercial egg layer managers have opted to induce molt older hens in order to extend their productive life for additional egg laying cycles. Conventional molt induction involves the complete removal of feed for several days. However, this management practice can lead to deleterious physiological responses by the hen and subsequent susceptibility to infection by pathogens. Consequently less stressful molting regimens involving the feeding of low energy diets such as Alfalfa have been developed. In this study, 80 week old laying hens that were deprived of feed or fed Alfalfa Meal during a nine day induced molt. Full fed hens were used as the control. On day 8 serum triglycerides were quantified and on day 9 hens were euthanized and the liver, spleen, heart, intestine, pancreas, ovary, and kidney were collected and weighed. Intestinal weight were highest in the non-molted hens, lower in the hens fed Alfalfa, and lower still in the hens deprived of feed. Molted hens exhibited reduced weights of liver, heart, ovary, and pancreas compared to the non-molted hens. Serum triglycerides were highest in the non-molted hens, less in feed deprived hens, and the lowest in Alfalfa fed hens. These results suggest that a comparable molt could be achieved with feeding Alfalfa Meal to 80 week hens compared to feed deprivation.

  • Immunological cell and serum metabolite response of 60-week-old commercial laying hens to an Alfalfa Meal molt diet.
    Bioresource Technology, 2007
    Co-Authors: K.l. Landers, R.w. Moore, C. S. Dunkley, P Herrera, D.a. Landers, Z.r. Howard, Jeffrey Lynn Mcreynolds, J.a. Bryd, Leon F. Kubena
    Abstract:

    The practice of induced molting involves the restriction of light, feed removal and optionally water for 5–14 days. However, there is growing concern regarding feed removal and animal welfare issues. With this in mind, alternative diets have been developed to produce similar molting eVects as that of feed deprivation. Alfalfa, which largely consists of insoluble Wber, can be used as a molting diet. In this study, heterophil and lymphocyte counts, serum chemistry, and organ weight parameters were evaluated in hens that were deprived of feed or fed Alfalfa during a nine day induced molt. Full-fed hens were used as the control. Blood serum parameters assessed included calcium, magnesium, glucose, total protein, ketone bodies, uric acid, and cholesterol. White blood cells were counted and categorized by cell type. On the ninth day of the trial, the hens were euthanized and the liver, spleen, heart, intestine, pancreas, ovary, oviduct, and kidney were collected and weighed. On day 8 birds molted with Alfalfa or by feed deprivation had signiWcantly higher (P 0.05) in either heterophil or lymphocyte percentages. However, heterophil percentages were higher in feed withdrawal birds than full-fed birds on day 4 but lymphocyte percentages were higher in full-fed birds compared to feed withdrawal birds. On day 8 of the induced molt lymphocyte percentages were higher from full-fed birds when compared to feed withdrawal birds but no signiWcant diVerences were detectable for heterophil percentages. Based on reproductive organ weight loss and changes in serum and immunological responses of birds during molt, it appears that Alfalfa Meal can be an eVective molt induction alternative. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

K.l. Landers – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Organ weight and serum triglyceride responses of older (80 week) commercial laying hens fed an Alfalfa Meal molt diet.
    Bioresource technology, 2007
    Co-Authors: K.l. Landers, Leon F. Kubena, R.w. Moore, P Herrera, D.a. Landers, Z.r. Howard, Jeffrey Lynn Mcreynolds, J.a. Bryd, D. J. Nisbet, S.c. Ricke
    Abstract:

    Since one of the costs in the commercial egg industry is that of replacement pullets, commercial egg layer managers have opted to induce molt older hens in order to extend their productive life for additional egg laying cycles. Conventional molt induction involves the complete removal of feed for several days. However, this management practice can lead to deleterious physiological responses by the hen and subsequent susceptibility to infection by pathogens. Consequently less stressful molting regimens involving the feeding of low energy diets such as Alfalfa have been developed. In this study, 80 week old laying hens that were deprived of feed or fed Alfalfa Meal during a nine day induced molt. Full fed hens were used as the control. On day 8 serum triglycerides were quantified and on day 9 hens were euthanized and the liver, spleen, heart, intestine, pancreas, ovary, and kidney were collected and weighed. Intestinal weight were highest in the non-molted hens, lower in the hens fed Alfalfa, and lower still in the hens deprived of feed. Molted hens exhibited reduced weights of liver, heart, ovary, and pancreas compared to the non-molted hens. Serum triglycerides were highest in the non-molted hens, less in feed deprived hens, and the lowest in Alfalfa fed hens. These results suggest that a comparable molt could be achieved with feeding Alfalfa Meal to 80 week hens compared to feed deprivation.

  • Immunological cell and serum metabolite response of 60-week-old commercial laying hens to an Alfalfa Meal molt diet.
    Bioresource Technology, 2007
    Co-Authors: K.l. Landers, R.w. Moore, C. S. Dunkley, P Herrera, D.a. Landers, Z.r. Howard, Jeffrey Lynn Mcreynolds, J.a. Bryd, Leon F. Kubena
    Abstract:

    The practice of induced molting involves the restriction of light, feed removal and optionally water for 5–14 days. However, there is growing concern regarding feed removal and animal welfare issues. With this in mind, alternative diets have been developed to produce similar molting eVects as that of feed deprivation. Alfalfa, which largely consists of insoluble Wber, can be used as a molting diet. In this study, heterophil and lymphocyte counts, serum chemistry, and organ weight parameters were evaluated in hens that were deprived of feed or fed Alfalfa during a nine day induced molt. Full-fed hens were used as the control. Blood serum parameters assessed included calcium, magnesium, glucose, total protein, ketone bodies, uric acid, and cholesterol. White blood cells were counted and categorized by cell type. On the ninth day of the trial, the hens were euthanized and the liver, spleen, heart, intestine, pancreas, ovary, oviduct, and kidney were collected and weighed. On day 8 birds molted with Alfalfa or by feed deprivation had signiWcantly higher (P 0.05) in either heterophil or lymphocyte percentages. However, heterophil percentages were higher in feed withdrawal birds than full-fed birds on day 4 but lymphocyte percentages were higher in full-fed birds compared to feed withdrawal birds. On day 8 of the induced molt lymphocyte percentages were higher from full-fed birds when compared to feed withdrawal birds but no signiWcant diVerences were detectable for heterophil percentages. Based on reproductive organ weight loss and changes in serum and immunological responses of birds during molt, it appears that Alfalfa Meal can be an eVective molt induction alternative. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

S.c. Ricke – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Organ weight and serum triglyceride responses of older (80 week) commercial laying hens fed an Alfalfa Meal molt diet.
    Bioresource technology, 2007
    Co-Authors: K.l. Landers, Leon F. Kubena, R.w. Moore, P Herrera, D.a. Landers, Z.r. Howard, Jeffrey Lynn Mcreynolds, J.a. Bryd, D. J. Nisbet, S.c. Ricke
    Abstract:

    Since one of the costs in the commercial egg industry is that of replacement pullets, commercial egg layer managers have opted to induce molt older hens in order to extend their productive life for additional egg laying cycles. Conventional molt induction involves the complete removal of feed for several days. However, this management practice can lead to deleterious physiological responses by the hen and subsequent susceptibility to infection by pathogens. Consequently less stressful molting regimens involving the feeding of low energy diets such as Alfalfa have been developed. In this study, 80 week old laying hens that were deprived of feed or fed Alfalfa Meal during a nine day induced molt. Full fed hens were used as the control. On day 8 serum triglycerides were quantified and on day 9 hens were euthanized and the liver, spleen, heart, intestine, pancreas, ovary, and kidney were collected and weighed. Intestinal weight were highest in the non-molted hens, lower in the hens fed Alfalfa, and lower still in the hens deprived of feed. Molted hens exhibited reduced weights of liver, heart, ovary, and pancreas compared to the non-molted hens. Serum triglycerides were highest in the non-molted hens, less in feed deprived hens, and the lowest in Alfalfa fed hens. These results suggest that a comparable molt could be achieved with feeding Alfalfa Meal to 80 week hens compared to feed deprivation.