Alkali Silica Reaction - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Alkali Silica Reaction

The Experts below are selected from a list of 294 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

James Margeson – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • is Alkali carbonate Reaction just a variant of Alkali Silica Reaction acr asr
    Cement and Concrete Research, 2010
    Co-Authors: P E Grattanbellew, Lyndon D Mitchell, James Margeson

    Abstract:

    Abstract The mechanism of the Alkali–carbonate Reaction (ACR) has been recognized as being different from that of the more common AlkaliSilica Reaction (ASR). However, the identification of AlkaliSilica gel in ACR concrete from Cornwall, Ontario, Canada by Katayama, in 1992 raised the possibility that ASR was at least playing a role in the ACR Reaction. The acid insoluble residues of the ACR aggregate from Kingston, along with two other aggregates were analyzed to determine what might be contributing to the Reaction. The acid insoluble residue of the ACR Kingston rock contains 96% quartz of high solubility in NaOH. Good correlation was found between the amount of quartz and expansion of concrete prisms indicating that the expansion was due mainly to an AlkaliSilica Reaction. This conclusion is supported by observations, in 2008, by Katayama of gel in thin sections of concrete made with the Kingston aggregate. It is concluded that ACR = ASR.

  • Is Alkali–carbonate Reaction just a variant of AlkaliSilica Reaction ACR = ASR?
    Cement and Concrete Research, 2010
    Co-Authors: P.e. Grattan-bellew, Lyndon D Mitchell, James Margeson

    Abstract:

    Abstract The mechanism of the Alkali–carbonate Reaction (ACR) has been recognized as being different from that of the more common AlkaliSilica Reaction (ASR). However, the identification of AlkaliSilica gel in ACR concrete from Cornwall, Ontario, Canada by Katayama, in 1992 raised the possibility that ASR was at least playing a role in the ACR Reaction. The acid insoluble residues of the ACR aggregate from Kingston, along with two other aggregates were analyzed to determine what might be contributing to the Reaction. The acid insoluble residue of the ACR Kingston rock contains 96% quartz of high solubility in NaOH. Good correlation was found between the amount of quartz and expansion of concrete prisms indicating that the expansion was due mainly to an AlkaliSilica Reaction. This conclusion is supported by observations, in 2008, by Katayama of gel in thin sections of concrete made with the Kingston aggregate. It is concluded that ACR = ASR.

P E Grattanbellew – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • is Alkali carbonate Reaction just a variant of Alkali Silica Reaction acr asr
    Cement and Concrete Research, 2010
    Co-Authors: P E Grattanbellew, Lyndon D Mitchell, James Margeson

    Abstract:

    Abstract The mechanism of the Alkali–carbonate Reaction (ACR) has been recognized as being different from that of the more common AlkaliSilica Reaction (ASR). However, the identification of AlkaliSilica gel in ACR concrete from Cornwall, Ontario, Canada by Katayama, in 1992 raised the possibility that ASR was at least playing a role in the ACR Reaction. The acid insoluble residues of the ACR aggregate from Kingston, along with two other aggregates were analyzed to determine what might be contributing to the Reaction. The acid insoluble residue of the ACR Kingston rock contains 96% quartz of high solubility in NaOH. Good correlation was found between the amount of quartz and expansion of concrete prisms indicating that the expansion was due mainly to an AlkaliSilica Reaction. This conclusion is supported by observations, in 2008, by Katayama of gel in thin sections of concrete made with the Kingston aggregate. It is concluded that ACR = ASR.

Lyndon D Mitchell – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • is Alkali carbonate Reaction just a variant of Alkali Silica Reaction acr asr
    Cement and Concrete Research, 2010
    Co-Authors: P E Grattanbellew, Lyndon D Mitchell, James Margeson

    Abstract:

    Abstract The mechanism of the Alkali–carbonate Reaction (ACR) has been recognized as being different from that of the more common AlkaliSilica Reaction (ASR). However, the identification of AlkaliSilica gel in ACR concrete from Cornwall, Ontario, Canada by Katayama, in 1992 raised the possibility that ASR was at least playing a role in the ACR Reaction. The acid insoluble residues of the ACR aggregate from Kingston, along with two other aggregates were analyzed to determine what might be contributing to the Reaction. The acid insoluble residue of the ACR Kingston rock contains 96% quartz of high solubility in NaOH. Good correlation was found between the amount of quartz and expansion of concrete prisms indicating that the expansion was due mainly to an AlkaliSilica Reaction. This conclusion is supported by observations, in 2008, by Katayama of gel in thin sections of concrete made with the Kingston aggregate. It is concluded that ACR = ASR.

  • Is Alkali–carbonate Reaction just a variant of AlkaliSilica Reaction ACR = ASR?
    Cement and Concrete Research, 2010
    Co-Authors: P.e. Grattan-bellew, Lyndon D Mitchell, James Margeson

    Abstract:

    Abstract The mechanism of the Alkali–carbonate Reaction (ACR) has been recognized as being different from that of the more common AlkaliSilica Reaction (ASR). However, the identification of AlkaliSilica gel in ACR concrete from Cornwall, Ontario, Canada by Katayama, in 1992 raised the possibility that ASR was at least playing a role in the ACR Reaction. The acid insoluble residues of the ACR aggregate from Kingston, along with two other aggregates were analyzed to determine what might be contributing to the Reaction. The acid insoluble residue of the ACR Kingston rock contains 96% quartz of high solubility in NaOH. Good correlation was found between the amount of quartz and expansion of concrete prisms indicating that the expansion was due mainly to an AlkaliSilica Reaction. This conclusion is supported by observations, in 2008, by Katayama of gel in thin sections of concrete made with the Kingston aggregate. It is concluded that ACR = ASR.