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Jose Mg Molinillo – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • recent advances in Allelopathy for weed control from knowledge to applications
    Pest Management Science, 2019
    Co-Authors: Francisco A Macias, Francisco J R Mejias, Jose Mg Molinillo
    Abstract:

    Allelopathy is the biological phenomenon of chemical interactions between living organisms in the ecosystem, and must be taken into account in addressing pest and weed problems in future sustainable agriculture. Allelopathy is a multidisciplinary science, but in some cases, aspects of its chemistry are overlooked, despite the need for a deep knowledge of the chemical structural characteristics of allelochemicals to facilitate the design of new herbicides. This review is focused on the most important advances in Allelopathy, paying particular attention to the design and development of phenolic compounds, terpenoids and alkaloids as herbicides. The isolation of allelochemicals is mainly addressed, but other aspects such as the analysis and activities of derivatives or analogs are also covered. Furthermore, the use of Allelopathy in the fight against parasitic plants is included. The past 12 years have been a prolific period for publications on Allelopathy. This critical review discusses future research areas in this field and the state of the art is analyzed from the chemist’s perspective. © 2019 Society of Chemical Industry.

  • Allelopathy–a natural alternative for weed control.
    Pest management science, 2007
    Co-Authors: Francisco A Macias, Jose Mg Molinillo, Rosa M. Varela, Juan C. G. Galindo
    Abstract:

    Allelopathy studies the interactions among plants, fungi, algae and bacteria with the organisms living in a certain ecosystem, interactions that are mediated by the secondary metabolites produced and exuded into the environment. Consequently, Allelopathy is a multidisciplinary science where ecologists, chemists, soil scientists, agronomists, biologists, plant physiologists and molecular biologists offer their skills to give an overall view of the complex interactions occurring in a certain ecosystem. As a result of these studies, applications in weed and pest management are expected in such different fields as development of new agrochemicals, cultural methods, developing of allelopathic crops with increased weed resistance, etc. The present paper will focus on the chemical aspects of Allelopathy, pointing out the most recent advances in the chemicals disclosed, their mode of action and their fate in the ecosystem. Also, attention will be paid to achievements in genomics and proteomics, two emerging fields in Allelopathy. Rather than being exhaustive, this paper is intended to reflect a critical vision of the current state of Allelopathy and to point to future lines of research where in the authors’ opinion the main advances and applications could and should be expected.

Francisco A Macias – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • recent advances in Allelopathy for weed control from knowledge to applications
    Pest Management Science, 2019
    Co-Authors: Francisco A Macias, Francisco J R Mejias, Jose Mg Molinillo
    Abstract:

    Allelopathy is the biological phenomenon of chemical interactions between living organisms in the ecosystem, and must be taken into account in addressing pest and weed problems in future sustainable agriculture. Allelopathy is a multidisciplinary science, but in some cases, aspects of its chemistry are overlooked, despite the need for a deep knowledge of the chemical structural characteristics of allelochemicals to facilitate the design of new herbicides. This review is focused on the most important advances in Allelopathy, paying particular attention to the design and development of phenolic compounds, terpenoids and alkaloids as herbicides. The isolation of allelochemicals is mainly addressed, but other aspects such as the analysis and activities of derivatives or analogs are also covered. Furthermore, the use of Allelopathy in the fight against parasitic plants is included. The past 12 years have been a prolific period for publications on Allelopathy. This critical review discusses future research areas in this field and the state of the art is analyzed from the chemist’s perspective. © 2019 Society of Chemical Industry.

  • Allelopathy–a natural alternative for weed control.
    Pest management science, 2007
    Co-Authors: Francisco A Macias, Jose Mg Molinillo, Rosa M. Varela, Juan C. G. Galindo
    Abstract:

    Allelopathy studies the interactions among plants, fungi, algae and bacteria with the organisms living in a certain ecosystem, interactions that are mediated by the secondary metabolites produced and exuded into the environment. Consequently, Allelopathy is a multidisciplinary science where ecologists, chemists, soil scientists, agronomists, biologists, plant physiologists and molecular biologists offer their skills to give an overall view of the complex interactions occurring in a certain ecosystem. As a result of these studies, applications in weed and pest management are expected in such different fields as development of new agrochemicals, cultural methods, developing of allelopathic crops with increased weed resistance, etc. The present paper will focus on the chemical aspects of Allelopathy, pointing out the most recent advances in the chemicals disclosed, their mode of action and their fate in the ecosystem. Also, attention will be paid to achievements in genomics and proteomics, two emerging fields in Allelopathy. Rather than being exhaustive, this paper is intended to reflect a critical vision of the current state of Allelopathy and to point to future lines of research where in the authors’ opinion the main advances and applications could and should be expected.

A. Bousquet-mélou – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Chemical interaction between Quercus pubescens and its companion species is not emphasized under drought stress
    European Journal of Forest Research, 2020
    Co-Authors: H. Hashoum, J. Gavinet, T. Gauquelin, V. Baldy, S. Dupouyet, C. Fernandez, A. Bousquet-mélou
    Abstract:

    How plant–plant interactions will interact with global change drivers such as increased drought during the regeneration phase is a key question to forecast future vegetation dynamics. Chemical interaction and especially Allelopathy and drought have been suggested to affect plant performance synergistically, i.e., that plant under drought stress would be more sensitive to allelochemicals and that exposure to allelopathic interactions could increase drought sensitivity through an inhibition of root development and mycorrhization. In this paper, we tested these hypotheses by using a controlled experiment with Quercus pubescens Mill. as a target species and three co-occurring species plus itself as source species. Allelopathic treatments consisted of annual provision of litter and monthly watering with green leaf aqueous extracts during two vegetation seasons starting from oak acorns. During the second vegetation season, a drought stress treatment was added on half of the seedlings. Allelopathy of co-occurring species reduced seedlings dimensions while Q. pubescens treatment increased it. During the second vegetation season, seedling growth rate and physiology were reduced by drought but poorly affected by allelopathic treatment. At the end of the experiment, drought stress and Allelopathy from Cotinus coggygria and Pinus halepensis both reduced seedling biomass but had opposite effects on the root/shoot ratio. Drought and Allelopathy did not interact significantly and, contrary to our hypothesis, there was a tendency of lower allelopathic effects under drought. Our results suggest that drought and Allelopathy could additively alter seedling development, but the opposite effects of Allelopathy and drought on the root/shoot ratio call for further experiments testing the interaction between these two factors.

  • The Impact of Competition and Allelopathy on the Trade-Off between Plant Defense and Growth in Two Contrasting Tree Species
    Frontiers in Plant Science, 2016
    Co-Authors: Catherine Fernandez, V. Baldy, Yogan Monnier, Mathieu Santonja, Christiane Gallet, Leslie Weston, Bernard Prévosto, Amelie Saunier, A. Bousquet-mélou
    Abstract:

    In contrast to plant-animal interactions, the conceptual framework regarding the impact of secondary metabolites in mediating plant-plant interference is currently less well defined. Here, we address hypotheses about the role of chemically-mediated plant-plant interference (i.e., Allelopathy) as a driver of Mediterranean foreforest dynamics. Growth and defense abilities of a pioneer (Pinus halepensis) and a late-successional (Quercus pubescens) Mediterranean forest species were evaluated under three different plant interference conditions: (i) Allelopathy simulated by application of aqueous needle extracts of Pinus, (ii) resource competition created by the physical presence of a neighboring species (Pinus or Quercus), and (iii) a combination of both Allelopathy and competition. After 24 months of experimentation in simulated field conditions, Quercus was more affected by plant interference treatments than was Pinus, and a hierarchical response to biotic interference (Allelopathy < competition < Allelopathy + competition) was observed in terms of relative impact on growth and plant defense. Both species modulated their respective metabolic profiles according to plant interference treatment and thus their inherent chemical defense status, resulting in a physiological trade-off between plant growth and production of defense metabolites. For Quercus, an increase in secondary metabolite production and a decrease in plant growth were observed in all treatments. In contrast, this trade-off in Pinus was only observed in competition and Allelopathy + competition treatments. Although Pinus and Quercus expressed differential responses when subjected to a single interference condition, either Allelopathy or competition, species responses were similar or positively correlated when strong interference conditions (Allelopathy + competition) were imposed.

I.m. Chung – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Rice Allelopathy and the possibility for weed management
    Annals of Applied Biology, 2007
    Co-Authors: Tran Dang Khanh, Tran Dang Xuan, I.m. Chung
    Abstract:

    In attempts to control weeds in rice, much effort has been focused on rice Allelopathy research for more than 30 years. Among screening methods that have been developed, some estimate the allelopathic potential of various rice cultivars in a limited time and space, which is less costly and can be conducted year round. Rice Allelopathy activity is variety dependent and origin dependent, where Japonica rice shows greater allelopathic activity than Indica and Japonica– Indica hybrids. Allelopathic characteristics in rice are quantitatively inherited and several Allelopathy-involved traits have been identified. Numerous phytotoxins such as cytokinins, diterpenoids, fatty acids, flavones, glucopyranosides, indoles, momilactones (A and B), oryzalexins, phenols, phenolic acids, resorcinols and stigmastanols have been identified and determined as growth inhibitors in rice. However, the fate and actual modes of action of these compounds as well as other potent rice phytotoxins in nature are not well understood. The question of which compounds play a major role in rice Allelopathy has remained obscure; however, rice Allelopathy might be attributable to the interaction of all present allelochemicals. Despite locating genes determining or involving Allelopathy in rice having attracted much effort, the introduction of these genes into target rice cultivars has not yet been achieved. Success in breeding new rice cultivars having good weed-suppressing ability would benefit farmers in rice-cultivating countries and play an important role in sustainable agricultural production.

Kadambot H M Siddique – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The role of Allelopathy in agricultural pest management.
    Pest Management Science, 2011
    Co-Authors: Muhammad Farooq, Khawar Jabran, Z A Cheema, Abdul Wahid, Kadambot H M Siddique
    Abstract:

    Allelopathy is a naturally occurring ecological phenomenon of interference among organisms that may be employed for managing weeds, insect pests and diseases in field crops. In field crops, Allelopathy can be used following rotation, using cover crops, mulching and plant extracts for natural pest management. Application of allelopathic plant extracts can effectively control weeds and insect pests. However, mixtures of allelopathic water extracts are more effective than the application of single-plant extract in this regard. Combined application of allelopathic extract and reduced herbicide dose (up to half the standard dose) give as much weed control as the standard herbicide dose in several field crops. Lower doses of herbicides may help to reduce the development of herbicide resistance in weed ecotypes. Allelopathy thus offers an attractive environmentally friendly alternative to pesticides in agricultural pest management. In this review, application of Allelopathy for natural pest management, particularly in small-farm intensive agricultural systems, is discussed.