Allergy - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Allergy

The Experts below are selected from a list of 373557 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Allergy – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Rachel L. Peters – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Prevalence and Natural History of Tree Nut Allergy
    Annals of Allergy Asthma & Immunology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Vicki Mcwilliam, Kirsten P. Perrett, Thanh D. Dang, Rachel L. Peters
    Abstract:

    Abstract Objective Tree nuts are common causes of food-related allergic reactions and anaphylaxis. Resolution of tree nut Allergy is thought to be low, yet studies of the natural history of tree nut Allergy are limited. This review summarizes the available literature regarding tree nut Allergy prevalence and natural history and discusses emerging diagnostic and prognostic developments that will inform clinical management of tree nut Allergy. Data Sources A comprehensive literature search using PubMed was performed. Study Selections Peer-reviewed publications relating to tree nut Allergy prevalence, resolution, and diagnosis were selected, and findings were summarized using a narrative approach. Results Tree nut Allergy prevalence varies by age, region, and food Allergy definition, and ranges from less than 1% to approximately 3% worldwide. Reports on the natural history of tree nut Allergy data are limited to retrospective clinical data or cross-sectional survey data of self-reported food Allergy, with reported resolution ranging from 9% to 14%. Component-resolved diagnostics and basophil activation testing offer the potential to improve the diagnostic accuracy and predicted prognosis of specific tree nut Allergy, but studies are limited. Conclusion Tree nut Allergy remains an understudied area of food Allergy research with limited region-specific studies based on robust food Allergy measures in population cohorts with longitudinal follow-up. This currently limits our understanding of tree nut Allergy prognosis.

  • Patterns of tree nut sensitization and Allergy in the first 6 years of life in a population-based cohort
    Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Vicki Mcwilliam, Jennifer J Koplin, Shyamali C Dharmage, Annelouise Ponsonby, Mimi L K Tang, Lyle C Gurrin, Rachel L. Peters, Kirsten P. Perrett, Katrina J. Allen, Terence Dwyer
    Abstract:

    Background Longitudinal population-based data regarding tree nut Allergy are limited. Objectives We sought to determine the population prevalence of tree nut Allergy at age 6 years and explore the relationship between egg and peanut Allergy at age 1 year and development of tree nut Allergy at age 6 years. Methods A population-based sample of 5276 children was recruited at age 1 year and followed up at age 6 years. At age 1 year, allergies to egg and peanut were determined by means of oral food challenge, and parents reported their child’s history of reaction to tree nuts. Challenge-confirmed tree nut Allergy was assessed at age 6 years. Results At age 1 year, the prevalence of parent-reported tree nut Allergy was 0.1% (95% CI, 0.04% to 0.2%). Only 18.5% of infants had consumed tree nuts in the first year of life. At age 6 years, challenge-confirmed tree nut Allergy prevalence was 3.3% (95% CI, 2.8% to 4.0%), with cashew the most common (2.7%; 95% CI, 2.2% to 3.3%). Of children with peanut Allergy only at age 1 year, 27% (95% CI, 16.1% to 39.7%) had tree nut Allergy at age 6 years compared with 14% (95% CI, 10.4% to 17.9%) of those with egg Allergy only and 37% (95% CI, 27.2% to 47.4%) of those with both peanut and egg Allergy. Conclusions Tree nut Allergy is uncommon in the first year of life, likely because of limited tree nut consumption. At age 6 years, tree nut Allergy prevalence is similar to peanut Allergy prevalence. More than a third of children with both peanut and egg Allergy in infancy have tree nut Allergy at age 6 years. Understanding how to prevent tree nut Allergy should be an urgent priority for future research.

Mariana Castells – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

Vicki Mcwilliam – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Prevalence and Natural History of Tree Nut Allergy
    Annals of Allergy Asthma & Immunology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Vicki Mcwilliam, Kirsten P. Perrett, Thanh D. Dang, Rachel L. Peters
    Abstract:

    Abstract Objective Tree nuts are common causes of food-related allergic reactions and anaphylaxis. Resolution of tree nut Allergy is thought to be low, yet studies of the natural history of tree nut Allergy are limited. This review summarizes the available literature regarding tree nut Allergy prevalence and natural history and discusses emerging diagnostic and prognostic developments that will inform clinical management of tree nut Allergy. Data Sources A comprehensive literature search using PubMed was performed. Study Selections Peer-reviewed publications relating to tree nut Allergy prevalence, resolution, and diagnosis were selected, and findings were summarized using a narrative approach. Results Tree nut Allergy prevalence varies by age, region, and food Allergy definition, and ranges from less than 1% to approximately 3% worldwide. Reports on the natural history of tree nut Allergy data are limited to retrospective clinical data or cross-sectional survey data of self-reported food Allergy, with reported resolution ranging from 9% to 14%. Component-resolved diagnostics and basophil activation testing offer the potential to improve the diagnostic accuracy and predicted prognosis of specific tree nut Allergy, but studies are limited. Conclusion Tree nut Allergy remains an understudied area of food Allergy research with limited region-specific studies based on robust food Allergy measures in population cohorts with longitudinal follow-up. This currently limits our understanding of tree nut Allergy prognosis.

  • Patterns of tree nut sensitization and Allergy in the first 6 years of life in a population-based cohort
    Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Vicki Mcwilliam, Jennifer J Koplin, Shyamali C Dharmage, Annelouise Ponsonby, Mimi L K Tang, Lyle C Gurrin, Rachel L. Peters, Kirsten P. Perrett, Katrina J. Allen, Terence Dwyer
    Abstract:

    Background Longitudinal population-based data regarding tree nut Allergy are limited. Objectives We sought to determine the population prevalence of tree nut Allergy at age 6 years and explore the relationship between egg and peanut Allergy at age 1 year and development of tree nut Allergy at age 6 years. Methods A population-based sample of 5276 children was recruited at age 1 year and followed up at age 6 years. At age 1 year, allergies to egg and peanut were determined by means of oral food challenge, and parents reported their child’s history of reaction to tree nuts. Challenge-confirmed tree nut Allergy was assessed at age 6 years. Results At age 1 year, the prevalence of parent-reported tree nut Allergy was 0.1% (95% CI, 0.04% to 0.2%). Only 18.5% of infants had consumed tree nuts in the first year of life. At age 6 years, challenge-confirmed tree nut Allergy prevalence was 3.3% (95% CI, 2.8% to 4.0%), with cashew the most common (2.7%; 95% CI, 2.2% to 3.3%). Of children with peanut Allergy only at age 1 year, 27% (95% CI, 16.1% to 39.7%) had tree nut Allergy at age 6 years compared with 14% (95% CI, 10.4% to 17.9%) of those with egg Allergy only and 37% (95% CI, 27.2% to 47.4%) of those with both peanut and egg Allergy. Conclusions Tree nut Allergy is uncommon in the first year of life, likely because of limited tree nut consumption. At age 6 years, tree nut Allergy prevalence is similar to peanut Allergy prevalence. More than a third of children with both peanut and egg Allergy in infancy have tree nut Allergy at age 6 years. Understanding how to prevent tree nut Allergy should be an urgent priority for future research.

Lars K. Poulsen – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

Kirsten P. Perrett – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Prevalence and Natural History of Tree Nut Allergy
    Annals of Allergy Asthma & Immunology, 2020
    Co-Authors: Vicki Mcwilliam, Kirsten P. Perrett, Thanh D. Dang, Rachel L. Peters
    Abstract:

    Abstract Objective Tree nuts are common causes of food-related allergic reactions and anaphylaxis. Resolution of tree nut Allergy is thought to be low, yet studies of the natural history of tree nut Allergy are limited. This review summarizes the available literature regarding tree nut Allergy prevalence and natural history and discusses emerging diagnostic and prognostic developments that will inform clinical management of tree nut Allergy. Data Sources A comprehensive literature search using PubMed was performed. Study Selections Peer-reviewed publications relating to tree nut Allergy prevalence, resolution, and diagnosis were selected, and findings were summarized using a narrative approach. Results Tree nut Allergy prevalence varies by age, region, and food Allergy definition, and ranges from less than 1% to approximately 3% worldwide. Reports on the natural history of tree nut Allergy data are limited to retrospective clinical data or cross-sectional survey data of self-reported food Allergy, with reported resolution ranging from 9% to 14%. Component-resolved diagnostics and basophil activation testing offer the potential to improve the diagnostic accuracy and predicted prognosis of specific tree nut Allergy, but studies are limited. Conclusion Tree nut Allergy remains an understudied area of food Allergy research with limited region-specific studies based on robust food Allergy measures in population cohorts with longitudinal follow-up. This currently limits our understanding of tree nut Allergy prognosis.

  • Patterns of tree nut sensitization and Allergy in the first 6 years of life in a population-based cohort
    Journal of Allergy and Clinical Immunology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Vicki Mcwilliam, Jennifer J Koplin, Shyamali C Dharmage, Annelouise Ponsonby, Mimi L K Tang, Lyle C Gurrin, Rachel L. Peters, Kirsten P. Perrett, Katrina J. Allen, Terence Dwyer
    Abstract:

    Background Longitudinal population-based data regarding tree nut Allergy are limited. Objectives We sought to determine the population prevalence of tree nut Allergy at age 6 years and explore the relationship between egg and peanut Allergy at age 1 year and development of tree nut Allergy at age 6 years. Methods A population-based sample of 5276 children was recruited at age 1 year and followed up at age 6 years. At age 1 year, allergies to egg and peanut were determined by means of oral food challenge, and parents reported their child’s history of reaction to tree nuts. Challenge-confirmed tree nut Allergy was assessed at age 6 years. Results At age 1 year, the prevalence of parent-reported tree nut Allergy was 0.1% (95% CI, 0.04% to 0.2%). Only 18.5% of infants had consumed tree nuts in the first year of life. At age 6 years, challenge-confirmed tree nut Allergy prevalence was 3.3% (95% CI, 2.8% to 4.0%), with cashew the most common (2.7%; 95% CI, 2.2% to 3.3%). Of children with peanut Allergy only at age 1 year, 27% (95% CI, 16.1% to 39.7%) had tree nut Allergy at age 6 years compared with 14% (95% CI, 10.4% to 17.9%) of those with egg Allergy only and 37% (95% CI, 27.2% to 47.4%) of those with both peanut and egg Allergy. Conclusions Tree nut Allergy is uncommon in the first year of life, likely because of limited tree nut consumption. At age 6 years, tree nut Allergy prevalence is similar to peanut Allergy prevalence. More than a third of children with both peanut and egg Allergy in infancy have tree nut Allergy at age 6 years. Understanding how to prevent tree nut Allergy should be an urgent priority for future research.