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Allocation Relationship

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Yangong Du – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • biomass Allocation and productivity richness Relationship across four grassland types at the qinghai plateau
    Ecology and Evolution, 2020
    Co-Authors: Xun Ke, Fawei Zhang, Yikang Li, Qian Li, Dawen Qian, Huakun Zhou, Yangong Du
    Abstract:

    Aboveground biomass (AGB) and belowground biombiomass (BGB) Allocation and productivity-richness Relationship are controversial. Here, we assessed AGB and BGB Allocation and the productivity-richness Relationship at community level across four grassland types based on the biomass data collected from 80 sites across the Qinghai Plateau during 2011-2012. The reduced major axis regression and general linear models were used and showed that (a) the median values of AGB were significantly higher in alpine meadow than in other three grassland types; the ratio of root to shoot (R/S) was significantly higher in desert grassland (36.06) than intemperate grassland (16.60), alpine meadow (13.35), and meadow steppe (19.46). The temperate grassland had deeper root distribution than the other three grasslands, with about 91.45% roots distributed in the top 30 cm soil layer. (b) The slopes between log AGB and log BGB in the temperate grassland and meadow steppe were 1.09 and 1, respectively, whereas that in the desert grassland was 1.12, which was significantly different from the isometric Allocation Relationship. A competitive Relationship between AGB and BGB was observed in the alpine meadow with a slope of -1.83, indicating a trade-off between AGB and BGB in the alpine meadow. (c) A positive productivity-richness Relationship existed across the four grassland types, suggesting that the positive productivity-richness Relationship might not be affected by the environmental factors at the plant location. Our results provide a new insight for biomass Allocation and biodiversity-ecosystem functioning research.

Xun Ke – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • biomass Allocation and productivity richness Relationship across four grassland types at the qinghai plateau
    Ecology and Evolution, 2020
    Co-Authors: Xun Ke, Fawei Zhang, Yikang Li, Qian Li, Dawen Qian, Huakun Zhou, Yangong Du
    Abstract:

    Aboveground biomass (AGB) and belowground biomass (BGB) Allocation and productivity-richness Relationship are controversial. Here, we assessed AGB and BGB Allocation and the productivity-richness Relationship at community level across four grassland types based on the biomass data collected from 80 sites across the Qinghai Plateau during 2011-2012. The reduced major axis regression and general linear models were used and showed that (a) the median values of AGB were significantly higher in alpine meadow than in other three grassland types; the ratio of root to shoot (R/S) was significantly higher in desert grassland (36.06) than intemperate grassland (16.60), alpine meadow (13.35), and meadow steppe (19.46). The temperate grassland had deeper root distribution than the other three grasslands, with about 91.45% roots distributed in the top 30 cm soil layer. (b) The slopes between log AGB and log BGB in the temperate grassland and meadow steppe were 1.09 and 1, respectively, whereas that in the desert grassland was 1.12, which was significantly different from the isometric Allocation Relationship. A competitive Relationship between AGB and BGB was observed in the alpine meadow with a slope of -1.83, indicating a trade-off between AGB and BGB in the alpine meadow. (c) A positive productivity-richness Relationship existed across the four grassland types, suggesting that the positive productivity-richness Relationship might not be affected by the environmental factors at the plant location. Our results provide a new insight for biomass Allocation and biodiversity-ecosystem functioning research.

David T. Fischer – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Enzymatic analysis of riverine bacterioplankton production
    Limnology and Oceanography, 1997
    Co-Authors: Robert L. Sinsabaugh, Stuart E. G. Findlay, Paula Franchini, David T. Fischer
    Abstract:

    Bacterial production is the entry point for detrital macronutrients into aquatic food webs. Many factors affect productivity, but the heterogeneity of detrital substrates and the diversity of microbial communities confound simple Relationships between carbon supply and growth. WC tried to link the two by analyzing extracellular enzyme activities. Water samples were collected from three rivers and assayed for bacterial productivity and the activities of eight enzymes. Production varied among systems, peaking at 644, 170, and 68 pmol C liter-’ d-’ in the Ottawa (Ohio), Maumee (Ohio), and Hudson (New York) Rivers. V,,,,, values were generally correlated with productivity. The mean ratios of productivity per unit peptidase and esterase activity were similar among rivers, whereas carbohydrase and phosphatase ratios varied widely. The data were used to evaluate a model that relates productivity to carbon flow by using enzyme activities as indicators and assuming an optimum resource Allocation Relationship among C-, N-, and P-acquiring enzymes. The data supported the model, but predictive power was low. Bacterial productivity generally increased with inorganic nutrient availability, but high levels of productivity at any specific eutrophic state required sources of both saccharides and amino acids.

Yikang Li – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • biomass Allocation and productivity richness Relationship across four grassland types at the qinghai plateau
    Ecology and Evolution, 2020
    Co-Authors: Xun Ke, Fawei Zhang, Yikang Li, Qian Li, Dawen Qian, Huakun Zhou, Yangong Du
    Abstract:

    Aboveground biomass (AGB) and belowground biomass (BGB) Allocation and productivity-richness Relationship are controversial. Here, we assessed AGB and BGB Allocation and the productivity-richness Relationship at community level across four grassland types based on the biomass data collected from 80 sites across the Qinghai Plateau during 2011-2012. The reduced major axis regression and general linear models were used and showed that (a) the median values of AGB were significantly higher in alpine meadow than in other three grassland types; the ratio of root to shoot (R/S) was significantly higher in desert grassland (36.06) than intemperate grassland (16.60), alpine meadow (13.35), and meadow steppe (19.46). The temperate grassland had deeper root distribution than the other three grasslands, with about 91.45% roots distributed in the top 30 cm soil layer. (b) The slopes between log AGB and log BGB in the temperate grassland and meadow steppe were 1.09 and 1, respectively, whereas that in the desert grassland was 1.12, which was significantly different from the isometric Allocation Relationship. A competitive Relationship between AGB and BGB was observed in the alpine meadow with a slope of -1.83, indicating a trade-off between AGB and BGB in the alpine meadow. (c) A positive productivity-richness Relationship existed across the four grassland types, suggesting that the positive productivity-richness Relationship might not be affected by the environmental factors at the plant location. Our results provide a new insight for biomass Allocation and biodiversity-ecosystem functioning research.

Huakun Zhou – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • biomass Allocation and productivity richness Relationship across four grassland types at the qinghai plateau
    Ecology and Evolution, 2020
    Co-Authors: Xun Ke, Fawei Zhang, Yikang Li, Qian Li, Dawen Qian, Huakun Zhou, Yangong Du
    Abstract:

    Aboveground biomass (AGB) and belowground biomass (BGB) Allocation and productivity-richness Relationship are controversial. Here, we assessed AGB and BGB Allocation and the productivity-richness Relationship at community level across four grassland types based on the biomass data collected from 80 sites across the Qinghai Plateau during 2011-2012. The reduced major axis regression and general linear models were used and showed that (a) the median values of AGB were significantly higher in alpine meadow than in other three grassland types; the ratio of root to shoot (R/S) was significantly higher in desert grassland (36.06) than intemperate grassland (16.60), alpine meadow (13.35), and meadow steppe (19.46). The temperate grassland had deeper root distribution than the other three grasslands, with about 91.45% roots distributed in the top 30 cm soil layer. (b) The slopes between log AGB and log BGB in the temperate grassland and meadow steppe were 1.09 and 1, respectively, whereas that in the desert grassland was 1.12, which was significantly different from the isometric Allocation Relationship. A competitive Relationship between AGB and BGB was observed in the alpine meadow with a slope of -1.83, indicating a trade-off between AGB and BGB in the alpine meadow. (c) A positive productivity-richness Relationship existed across the four grassland types, suggesting that the positive productivity-richness Relationship might not be affected by the environmental factors at the plant location. Our results provide a new insight for biomass Allocation and biodiversity-ecosystem functioning research.