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Richard L Mccreery – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • corrosion protection of untreated aa 2024 t3 in chloride solution by a chromate conversion coating monitored with raman spectroscopy
    Journal of The Electrochemical Society, 1998
    Co-Authors: Jun Zhao, G S Frankel, Richard L Mccreery

    Abstract:

    The behavior of chromate conversion coatings (CCCs) on the aluminum aircraft Alloy AA 2024-T3 was examined by several types of experiments, using Raman spectroscopy as a primary technique. First, Raman spectra of the CCC film made from a commercial process revealed a Raman feature characteristic of Cr(VI) which was distinct from Raman bands of pure CrO4 − 2 or Cr2O7 − 2 . Second, Raman spectroscopy was used to monitor migration of chromate species from a CCC film to an initially untreated Alloy Sample. The release of chromate from a CCC was demonstrated, as was redeposition of a chromate film on the fresh Alloy surface. Formation of a Raman-observable Cr(VI)-containing deposit was more rapid in or near pits in the untreated Alloy Sample, and the deposit was spectroscopically very similar to the original CCC film. The initially untreated Alloy became much less active toward corrosion after migration of chromate from the nearby CCC film, with the polarization resistance increasing by at least two orders of magnitude and the pitting potential increasing by 60 mV. The results clarify the mechanism of self-healing exhibited by CCC films, in which chromate species released from the CCC migrate to an actively corroding region and stop aluminum dissolution. The migrating chromate is selectively deposited at active corrosion sites, either by forming an insoluble Al/chromate is selectively deposited at active corrosion sites, either by forming an insoluble Al/chromate precipitate or by adsorption by previously formed corrosion

  • Corrosion Protection of Untreated AA‐2024‐T3 in Chloride Solution by a Chromate Conversion Coating Monitored with Raman Spectroscopy
    Journal of The Electrochemical Society, 1998
    Co-Authors: Jun Zhao, G S Frankel, Richard L Mccreery

    Abstract:

    The behavior of chromate conversion coatings (CCCs) on the aluminum aircraft Alloy AA 2024-T3 was examined by several types of experiments, using Raman spectroscopy as a primary technique. First, Raman spectra of the CCC film made from a commercial process revealed a Raman feature characteristic of Cr(VI) which was distinct from Raman bands of pure CrO4 − 2 or Cr2O7 − 2 . Second, Raman spectroscopy was used to monitor migration of chromate species from a CCC film to an initially untreated Alloy Sample. The release of chromate from a CCC was demonstrated, as was redeposition of a chromate film on the fresh Alloy surface. Formation of a Raman-observable Cr(VI)-containing deposit was more rapid in or near pits in the untreated Alloy Sample, and the deposit was spectroscopically very similar to the original CCC film. The initially untreated Alloy became much less active toward corrosion after migration of chromate from the nearby CCC film, with the polarization resistance increasing by at least two orders of magnitude and the pitting potential increasing by 60 mV. The results clarify the mechanism of self-healing exhibited by CCC films, in which chromate species released from the CCC migrate to an actively corroding region and stop aluminum dissolution. The migrating chromate is selectively deposited at active corrosion sites, either by forming an insoluble Al/chromate is selectively deposited at active corrosion sites, either by forming an insoluble Al/chromate precipitate or by adsorption by previously formed corrosion

Takayuki Takasugi – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • evaluation of surface modified ti 6al 4v Alloy by combination of plasma carburizing and deep rolling
    Materials Science and Engineering A-structural Materials Properties Microstructure and Processing, 2008
    Co-Authors: N Tsuji, S Tanaka, Takayuki Takasugi

    Abstract:

    Abstract Plasma surface diffusion processes such as plasma-carburizing and nitriding have been used to improve tribological properties of titanium and its Alloys. However, the improvement of fatigue strength by these processes has not been successful due to brittleness introduced in the high-hardness surface layer and the disappearance of compressive residual stress and grain growth by heating. In this work, a Ti–6Al–4V Alloy Sample was plasma-carburized at a relatively low temperature to improve wear resistance, and then, deep-rolled to induce compressive residual stress. Scanning electron microscopy, optical microscopy, laser scanning microscopy, surface roughness tester, X-ray diffractometer, and micro-hardness tester were used to characterize the modified surface layer. The residual stress and work hardening state was analyzed by X-ray diffraction techniques. The effect of deep-rolling on fatigue strength and wear resistance of plasma-carburized Ti–6Al–4V Alloy was also investigated. The fatigue properties and wear resistance of Ti–6Al–4V Alloy modified by a combination of low-temperature plasma-carburizing and deep-rolling were significantly improved in comparison with those of the unmodified Ti–6Al–4V Alloy.

Jun Zhao – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • corrosion protection of untreated aa 2024 t3 in chloride solution by a chromate conversion coating monitored with raman spectroscopy
    Journal of The Electrochemical Society, 1998
    Co-Authors: Jun Zhao, G S Frankel, Richard L Mccreery

    Abstract:

    The behavior of chromate conversion coatings (CCCs) on the aluminum aircraft Alloy AA 2024-T3 was examined by several types of experiments, using Raman spectroscopy as a primary technique. First, Raman spectra of the CCC film made from a commercial process revealed a Raman feature characteristic of Cr(VI) which was distinct from Raman bands of pure CrO4 − 2 or Cr2O7 − 2 . Second, Raman spectroscopy was used to monitor migration of chromate species from a CCC film to an initially untreated Alloy Sample. The release of chromate from a CCC was demonstrated, as was redeposition of a chromate film on the fresh Alloy surface. Formation of a Raman-observable Cr(VI)-containing deposit was more rapid in or near pits in the untreated Alloy Sample, and the deposit was spectroscopically very similar to the original CCC film. The initially untreated Alloy became much less active toward corrosion after migration of chromate from the nearby CCC film, with the polarization resistance increasing by at least two orders of magnitude and the pitting potential increasing by 60 mV. The results clarify the mechanism of self-healing exhibited by CCC films, in which chromate species released from the CCC migrate to an actively corroding region and stop aluminum dissolution. The migrating chromate is selectively deposited at active corrosion sites, either by forming an insoluble Al/chromate is selectively deposited at active corrosion sites, either by forming an insoluble Al/chromate precipitate or by adsorption by previously formed corrosion

  • Corrosion Protection of Untreated AA‐2024‐T3 in Chloride Solution by a Chromate Conversion Coating Monitored with Raman Spectroscopy
    Journal of The Electrochemical Society, 1998
    Co-Authors: Jun Zhao, G S Frankel, Richard L Mccreery

    Abstract:

    The behavior of chromate conversion coatings (CCCs) on the aluminum aircraft Alloy AA 2024-T3 was examined by several types of experiments, using Raman spectroscopy as a primary technique. First, Raman spectra of the CCC film made from a commercial process revealed a Raman feature characteristic of Cr(VI) which was distinct from Raman bands of pure CrO4 − 2 or Cr2O7 − 2 . Second, Raman spectroscopy was used to monitor migration of chromate species from a CCC film to an initially untreated Alloy Sample. The release of chromate from a CCC was demonstrated, as was redeposition of a chromate film on the fresh Alloy surface. Formation of a Raman-observable Cr(VI)-containing deposit was more rapid in or near pits in the untreated Alloy Sample, and the deposit was spectroscopically very similar to the original CCC film. The initially untreated Alloy became much less active toward corrosion after migration of chromate from the nearby CCC film, with the polarization resistance increasing by at least two orders of magnitude and the pitting potential increasing by 60 mV. The results clarify the mechanism of self-healing exhibited by CCC films, in which chromate species released from the CCC migrate to an actively corroding region and stop aluminum dissolution. The migrating chromate is selectively deposited at active corrosion sites, either by forming an insoluble Al/chromate is selectively deposited at active corrosion sites, either by forming an insoluble Al/chromate precipitate or by adsorption by previously formed corrosion