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Esra Topcuoglu – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Evaluation of instrumental and sensory measurements using multivariate analysis in probiotic yogurt enriched with Almond Milk
    Journal of Food Science and Technology, 2021
    Co-Authors: Lutfiye Yilmaz-ersan, Esra Topcuoglu
    Abstract:

    Highlights Consumers demand the purchase of fortified dairy products. Instrumental (color, texture) and sensorial attributes are critical tests for novel food. Almond Milk has high nutritional value with unique textural and sensorial properties. Almond Milk is an innovative and attractive additive in probiotic yogurt. Abstract In this study, the effect of Almond Milk addition on color, texture and sensory attributes of probiotic yogurt was investigated. The data generated in combination with instrumental (color and texture parameters) and sensory measurements was analysed statistically to describe a product’s attributes scientifically. Statistical analysis illustrated that Almond Milk rate and storage time had a significant ( P  

  • Evaluation of instrumental and sensory measurements using multivariate analysis in probiotic yogurt enriched with Almond Milk
    Journal of food science and technology, 2021
    Co-Authors: Lutfiye Yilmaz-ersan, Esra Topcuoglu
    Abstract:

    In this study, the effect of Almond Milk addition on color, texture and sensory attributes of probiotic yogurt was investigated. The data generated in combination with instrumental (color and texture parameters) and sensory measurements was analysed statistically to describe a product’s attributes scientifically. Statistical analysis illustrated that Almond Milk rate and storage time had a significant (P 

  • evaluation of instrumental and sensory measurements using multivariate analysis in probiotic yogurt enriched with Almond Milk
    Journal of Food Science and Technology-mysore, 2021
    Co-Authors: Lutfiye Yilmazersan, Esra Topcuoglu
    Abstract:

    Highlights Consumers demand the purchase of fortified dairy products.Instrumental (color, texture) and sensorial attributes are critical tests for novel food.Almond Milk has high nutritional value with unique textural and sensorial properties.Almond Milk is an innovative and attractive additive in probiotic yogurt. Abstract In this study, the effect of Almond Milk addition on color, texture and sensory attributes of probiotic yogurt was investigated. The data generated in combination with instrumental (color and texture parameters) and sensory measurements was analysed statistically to describe a product’s attributes scientifically. Statistical analysis illustrated that Almond Milk rate and storage time had a significant (P < 0.05) effect on the color and textural parameters of yogurt. Compared with the sensorial parameters, generally there were statistically significant differences among samples, whereas insignificant effect was determined among storage days. The results of descriptive statistics (Principle Component and Hierarchical Cluster Analysis) indicated that the relationships among the analysed attributes were determined. In addition, statistical data has demonstrated that Almond Milk may be used as a novel and functional ingredient in both industrial and research areas for development, innovation, quality, and safety of dairy products.

Zezhang T. Wen – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Analysis of cariogenic potential of alternative Milk beverages by in vitro Streptococcus mutans biofilm model and ex vivo caries model
    Archives of oral biology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Yan Huang, Zezhang T. Wen, Tatyana Thompson, Yapin Wang, Lin Zhu, Janice A. Townsend
    Abstract:

    To evaluate the potential of various alternative Milk beverages to support bacterial biofilm formation and acid production and cause unbalanced demineralization. in vitro assays were used to examine the ability of the beverages to support Streptococcus mutans’ biofilm formation and acid production from sugar fermentation and the capacity of the beverages to buffer pH changes. Biofilm formation was done using 96-well plate model. Acid production was measured using L-Lactate assay kit, and the buffering capacity was assessed by pH titration. For ex vivo caries model, enamel and dentine slabs and S. mutans biofilms were exposed to selected alternative Milk beverages three times a day, 30 min each, and by the end of the experiments, slab’s demineralization was assessed by loss of surface microhardness. Of the alternative Milk beverages tested in this study, Original Almond consistently supported the most S. mutans biofilms, followed by Chocolate Cashew Milk, while the least biofilms were measured with Unsweetened Flax Milk. The most acids and the lowest culture pH were measured with Toasted Coconut Almond Milk, while the least buffering capacity was measured with Unsweetened Coconut Milk. The results of ex vivo caries model showed that like Bovine Whole Milk, repeated exposure to Original Almond led to significant enamel and dentine slab demineralization, when compared to those exposed to saline as a control (P < 0.001). These results further provide support that popular alternative Milk beverages, especially those with supplemental sugars, are potentially cariogenic. Copyright © 2019 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  • Analysis of the Cariogenic Potential of Various Almond Milk Beverages using a Streptococcus mutans Biofilm Model in vitro.
    Caries research, 2017
    Co-Authors: Janelle Lee, Janice A. Townsend, Tatyana Thompson, Thomas Garitty, Brian M. Peters, Zezhang T. Wen
    Abstract:

    To evaluate the cariogenic properties of Almond Milk beverages, 6 Almond Milks, along with soy and whole bovine Milk, were analyzed for their abilities to support Streptococcus mutans biofilm formation and acid production, and their capacity to buffer changes in pH. Biofilm formation by S. mutans was analyzed using an in vitro 96-well plate model and measured by crystal violet staining. Acid production by S. mutans was evaluated by a colorimetric L-lactate assay and pH measurement of bacterial cultures. Buffering capacity was assessed by a pH titration assay. Soy Milk supported the most biofilm growth, while the least was observed with unsweetened Almond Milk (both p < 0.001). Among Almond Milks, sucrose-sweetened Milk led to the highest level of biofilm formation (p < 0.001), while the least was observed with unsweetened Milk (p < 0.05). Sucrose-sweetened Almond Milk yielded the lowest pH (4.56 ± 0.66), followed by soy Milk and bovine Milk; the highest pH was with unsweetened Almond Milk (6.48 ± 0.5). When analyzed by pH titration, the unsweetened Almond Milk displayed the weakest buffering capacity while bovine Milk showed the highest (p < 0.001). These results suggest that the Almond Milk beverages, except those that are sweetened with sucrose, possess limited cariogenic properties, while soy Milk exhibits the most cariogenic potential. As Milk alternatives become increasingly popular, dentists must counsel their patients that Almond Milks, especially sucrose-sweetened varieties, have cariogenic potential. For patients who are lactose-intolerant or suffer from Milk allergy, Almond Milks may be a better alternative than soy-based products.

Byron F. Brehm-stecher – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Capture, Concentration, and Detection of Salmonella in Foods Using Magnetic Ionic Liquids and Recombinase Polymerase Amplification
    Analytical chemistry, 2018
    Co-Authors: Stephanie A. Hice, Kevin D. Clark, Jared L. Anderson, Byron F. Brehm-stecher
    Abstract:

    We previously investigated the extraction and concentration of bacteria from model systems using magnetic ionic liquid (MIL) solvents while retaining their viability. Here, we combine MIL-based sample preparation with isothermal amplification and detection of Salmonella-specific DNA using recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA). After initial developmental work with Serratia marcescens in water, Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028 was inoculated in water, 2% Milk, Almond Milk, or liquid egg samples and extracted using one of two MILs, including trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium cobalt(II) hexafluoroacetylacetonate ([P66614+][Co(hfacac)3-]) and trihexyl(tetradecyl)phosphonium nickel(II) hexafluoroacetylacetonate ([P66614+][Ni(hfacac)3-]). Viable cells were recovered from the MIL extraction phase after the addition of modified LB broth, followed by a 20 min isothermal RPA assay. Amplification was carried out using supersaturated sodium acetate heat packs and results compared to those using a conventional laboratory thermocycler set to a single temperature. Results were visualized using either gel electrophoresis or nucleic acid lateral flow immunoassay (NALFIA). The combined MIL-RPA approach enabled detection of Salmonella at levels as low as 103 CFU mL-1. MIL-based sample preparation required less than 5 min to capture and concentrate sufficient cells for detection using RPA, which (including NALFIA or gel-based analysis) required approximately 30-45 min. Our results suggest the utility of MILs for the rapid extraction and concentration of pathogenic microorganisms in food samples, providing a means for physical enrichment that is compatible with downstream analysis using RPA.

  • Capture, Concentration, and Detection of Salmonella in Foods Using Magnetic Ionic Liquids and Recombinase Polymerase Amplification
    , 2018
    Co-Authors: Stephanie A. Hice, Kevin D. Clark, Jared L. Anderson, Byron F. Brehm-stecher
    Abstract:

    We previously investigated the extraction and concentration of bacteria from model systems using magnetic ionic liquid (MIL) solvents while retaining their viability. Here, we combine MIL-based sample preparation with isothermal amplification and detection of Salmonella-specific DNA using recombinase polymerase amplification (RPA). After initial developmental work with Serratia marcescens in water, Salmonella Typhimurium ATCC 14028 was inoculated in water, 2% Milk, Almond Milk, or liquid egg samples and extracted using one of two MILs, including trihexyl­(tetradecyl)­phosphonium cobalt­(II) hexafluoroacetylacetonate ([P66614+]­[Co­(hfacac)3–]) and trihexyl­(tetradecyl)­phosphonium nickel­(II) hexafluoroacetylacetonate ([P66614+]­[Ni­(hfacac)3–]). Viable cells were recovered from the MIL extraction phase after the addition of modified LB broth, followed by a 20 min isothermal RPA assay. Amplification was carried out using supersaturated sodium acetate heat packs and results compared to those using a conventional laboratory thermocycler set to a single temperature. Results were visualized using either gel electrophoresis or nucleic acid lateral flow immunoassay (NALFIA). The combined MIL-RPA approach enabled detection of Salmonella at levels as low as 103 CFU mL–1. MIL-based sample preparation required less than 5 min to capture and concentrate sufficient cells for detection using RPA, which (including NALFIA or gel-based analysis) required approximately 30–45 min. Our results suggest the utility of MILs for the rapid extraction and concentration of pathogenic microorganisms in food samples, providing a means for physical enrichment that is compatible with downstream analysis using RPA

Vijaya Raghavan – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Effect of pulsed ultrasound, a green food processing technique, on the secondary structure and in-vitro digestibility of Almond Milk protein
    Food research international (Ottawa Ont.), 2020
    Co-Authors: Sai Kranthi Vanga, Jin Wang, Valérie Orsat, Vijaya Raghavan
    Abstract:

    In recent years, Almond has been considered as one of the most common alternative plant-based protein sources due to its nutritional attributes and health benefits. However, Almond protein has a lower digestibility compared with the animal protein. The objective of this study is to investigate the impact of pulsed high-intensity ultrasound on the secondary structure of the Almond protein. The changes in the in-vitro protein digestibility (IVPD %) are also evaluated to investigate the relationship between the structure and digestibility of the Almond protein. The secondary structures were analyzed using Fourier-transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) and circular dichdichroism (CD) spectroscopy. FT-IR analysis showed a slight relocation in the ordered and unordered structures in the ultrasonicated Almond protein compared to the control. CD spectroscopy revealed that ultrasound resulted in the restructuring of α-helices into β-sheets. However, upon treating the Almond protein for 16 min, a slight recovery in α-helices was observed. Moisture content was found to affect the secondary structure orientations of Almond protein significantly. Although the IVPD% change was not statistically significant, it was found to be increasing slightly with processing duration and was dependent on protein secondary structure.

  • How well do plant based alternatives fare nutritionally compared to cow’s Milk?
    Journal of Food Science and Technology, 2018
    Co-Authors: Sai Kranthi Vanga, Vijaya Raghavan
    Abstract:

    Due to the issues like lactose intolerance and Milk allergy arising from the consumption of cow’s Milk, there has been an increased demand in the plant based alternative Milks around the world. Food industry has addressed these demands by introducing various Milk beverages which are promoted as alternatives coming from plant sources which include Almond Milk and soy Milk. Though they are popularly advertised as healthy and wholesome, little research has been done in understanding the nutritional implications of consuming these Milk beverages in short term and long term. Further, consumers associate these alternatives to be a direct substitute of cow’s Milk which might not be true in all cases. This review tries to address the issue by outlining the differences between cow’s Milk and commercially available alternative Milks in terms of their nutrient content. Though various plant based alternate Milks have been studied, only the four most consumed Milk beverages are presented in this review which are consumed widely around the world. A complete nutritional outline and the corresponding health benefits of consuming these plant based Milk beverages have been discussed in detail which could help the consumers make an informed decision.

  • How well do plant based alternatives fare nutritionally compared to cow’s Milk?
    Journal of food science and technology, 2017
    Co-Authors: Sai Kranthi Vanga, Vijaya Raghavan
    Abstract:

    Due to the issues like lactose intolerance and Milk allergy arising from the consumption of cow’s Milk, there has been an increased demand in the plant based alternative Milks around the world. Food industry has addressed these demands by introducing various Milk beverages which are promoted as alternatives coming from plant sources which include Almond Milk and soy Milk. Though they are popularly advertised as healthy and wholesome, little research has been done in understanding the nutritional implications of consuming these Milk beverages in short term and long term. Further, consumers associate these alternatives to be a direct substitute of cow’s Milk which might not be true in all cases. This review tries to address the issue by outlining the differences between cow’s Milk and commercially available alternative Milks in terms of their nutrient content. Though various plant based alternate Milks have been studied, only the four most consumed Milk beverages are presented in this review which are consumed widely around the world. A complete nutritional outline and the corresponding health benefits of consuming these plant based Milk beverages have been discussed in detail which could help the consumers make an informed decision.

Elias Marvinney – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Life cycle assessment of California unsweetened Almond Milk
    The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, 2020
    Co-Authors: Kiara S. Winans, Ilan Macadam-somer, Alissa Kendall, Roland Geyer, Elias Marvinney
    Abstract:

    Purpose Plant-based alternatives to dairy Milk have grown in popularity over the last decade. Almond Milk comprises the largest share of plant-based Milk in the US market and, as with so many food products, stakeholders in the supply chain are increasingly interested in understanding the environmental impacts of its production, particularly its carbon footprint and water consumption. This study undertakes a life cyclcycle assessment (LCA) of a California unsweetened Almond Milk. Methods The scope of this LCA includes the production of Almond Milk in primary packaging at the factory gate. California produces all US Almonds, which are grown under irrigated conditions. Spatially resolved modeling of Almond cultivation and primary data collection from one Almond Milk supply chain were used to develop the LCA model. While the environmental indicators of greatest interest are global warming potential (GWP) and freshwater consumption (FWC), additional impact categories from US EPA’s TRACI assessment method are also calculated. Co-products are accounted for using economic allocation, but mass-based allocation and displacement are also tested to understand the effect of co-product allocation choices on results. Results and discussion The GWP and FWC of one 48 oz. (1.42 L) bottle of unsweetened Almond Milk are 0.71 kg CO_2e and 175 kg of water. A total of 0.39 kg CO_2e (or 55%) of the GWP is attributable to the Almond Milk, with the remainder attributable to packaging. Almond cultivation alone is responsible for 95% of the FWC (167 kg H_2O), because of irrigation water demand. Total primary energy consumption (TPE) is estimated at 14.8 MJ. The 48 oz. (1.42 L) PET bottle containing the Almond Milk is the single largest contributor to TPE (42%) and GWP (35%). Using recycled PET instead of virgin PET for the bottle considerably reduces all impact indicators except for eutrophication potential. Conclusions For the supply chain studied here, packaging choices provide the most immediate opportunities for reducing impacts related to GWP and TPE, but would not result in a significant reduction in FWC because irrigation water for Almond cultivation is the dominant consumer. To provide context for interpretation, average US dairy Milk appears to have about 4.5 times the GWP and 1.8 times the FWC of the studied Almond Milk on a volumetric basis.

  • Life cycle assessment of California unsweetened Almond Milk
    The International Journal of Life Cycle Assessment, 2019
    Co-Authors: Kiara S. Winans, Ilan Macadam-somer, Alissa Kendall, Roland Geyer, Elias Marvinney
    Abstract:

    Plant-based alternatives to dairy Milk have grown in popularity over the last decade. Almond Milk comprises the largest share of plant-based Milk in the US market and, as with so many food products, stakeholders in the supply chain are increasingly interested in understanding the environmental impacts of its production, particularly its carbon footprint and water consumption. This study undertakes a life cyclcycle assessment (LCA) of a California unsweetened Almond Milk. The scope of this LCA includes the production of Almond Milk in primary packaging at the factory gate. California produces all US Almonds, which are grown under irrigated conditions. Spatially resolved modeling of Almond cultivation and primary data collection from one Almond Milk supply chain were used to develop the LCA model. While the environmental indicators of greatest interest are global warming potential (GWP) and freshwater consumption (FWC), additional impact categories from US EPA’s TRACI assessment method are also calculated. Co-products are accounted for using economic allocation, but mass-based allocation and displacement are also tested to understand the effect of co-product allocation choices on results. The GWP and FWC of one 48 oz. (1.42 L) bottle of unsweetened Almond Milk are 0.71 kg CO2e and 175 kg of water. A total of 0.39 kg CO2e (or 55%) of the GWP is attributable to the Almond Milk, with the remainder attributable to packaging. Almond cultivation alone is responsible for 95% of the FWC (167 kg H2O), because of irrigation water demand. Total primary energy consumption (TPE) is estimated at 14.8 MJ. The 48 oz. (1.42 L) PET bottle containing the Almond Milk is the single largest contributor to TPE (42%) and GWP (35%). Using recycled PET instead of virgin PET for the bottle considerably reduces all impact indicators except for eutrophication potential. For the supply chain studied here, packaging choices provide the most immediate opportunities for reducing impacts related to GWP and TPE, but would not result in a significant reduction in FWC because irrigation water for Almond cultivation is the dominant consumer. To provide context for interpretation, average US dairy Milk appears to have about 4.5 times the GWP and 1.8 times the FWC of the studied Almond Milk on a volumetric basis.