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Alpha Acid

The Experts below are selected from a list of 162 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Branka Javornik – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Identification of quantitative trait loci for resistance to Verticillium wilt and yield parameters in hop (Humulus lupulus L.)
    Theoretical and Applied Genetics, 2013
    Co-Authors: Jernej Jakše, Andreja Cerenak, Zlata Luthar, Sebastjan Radisek, Zlatko Satovic, Branka Javornik

    Abstract:

    Verticillium wilt (VW) can cause substantial yield loss in hop particularly with the outbreaks of the lethal strain of Verticillium albo – atrum. To elucidate genetic control of VW resistance in hop, an F_1 mapping population derived from a cross of cultivar Wye Target, with the predicted genetic basis of resistance, and susceptible male breeding line BL2/1 was developed to assess wilting symptoms and to perform QTL mapping. The genetic linkage map, constructed with 203 markers of various types using a pseudo-testcross strategy, formed ten major linkage groups (LG) of the maternal and paternal maps, covering 552.98 and 441.1 cM, respectively. A significant QTL for VW resistance was detected at LOD 7 on a single chromosomal region on LG03 of both parental maps, accounting for 24.2–26.0 % of the phenotypic variance. QTL analysis for AlphaAcid content and yield parameters was also performed on this map. QTLs for these traits were also detected and confirmed our previously detected QTLs in a different pedigree and environment. The work provides the basis for exploration of QTL flanking markers for possible use in marker-assisted selection.

  • Mapping of QTLs for Yield and Alpha Acid Content in Hop
    Acta Horticulturae, 2009
    Co-Authors: Andreja Čerenak, Branka Javornik, Zlatko Šatović, Jernej Jakše, Zlata Luthar, Klaudija Carović-stanko

    Abstract:

    Hop breeding is a lengthy process due to the dioecious nature of hop, producing highly heterozygous offspring and only female plants are of commercial interest. Molecular approaches have therefore been developed to support conventional hop breeding programmes. We studied the effects of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and determined map locations for AlphaAcid content and yield in hop, using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and microsatellite markers (SSRs). Genetic linkage maps were constructed from a mapping population consisting of 111 progeny from a double pseudo-testcross. A total of 194 markers were located on the 20 linkage groups (LGs) of the maternal and paternal maps, covering total map lengths of 706 and 616 cM, respectively. Due to the presence of common biparental SSR markers, homology of LGs between parental maps could be inferred. The progeny segregated quantitatively for AlphaAcid content and yield determined in the years from 2002 – 2006. Several putative QTLs were determined and the results are discussed from the point of view of implementation of a marker-assisted selection (MAS) programme in hop.

  • Identification of QTLs for Alpha Acid content and yield in hop (Humulus Lupulus L.)
    Euphytica, 2009
    Co-Authors: Andreja Čerenak, Zlatko Šatović, Jernej Jakše, Zlata Luthar, Klaudija Carović-stanko, Branka Javornik

    Abstract:

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and microsatellite (SSR) markers were applied to a segregation population of 111 genotypes derived from a pseudo-testcross of hop (Humulus lupulus L.) in order to detect quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for AlphaAcid content and yield traits. A total of 199 markers (150 AFLPs, 43 SSRs, one hypothetical sex marker, five chs genes) were located on the 20 linkage groups (LGs) of the maternal and paternal maps, covering 706 and 616 cM, respectively. Due to the presence of 16 common biparental SSR markers, homology of seven LGs between parental maps could be inferred. The progeny segregated quantitatively for AlphaAcid content and yield determined in the years from 2002–2006. A total of 13 putative QTLs for Alpha Acid content, 13 for dry cone weight and 18 for harvest index were identified on the two maps across years. Possible homologies between the detected QTLs on the two maps as well as in different years were established for all three traits. The most promising QTL for Alpha Acid content was identified on LG03 flanked by two AFLP markers (E-ACC-M-CAA103F*/P-ACA-M-CAC412F). From 13.80 to 36.64% higher content of Alpha Acids than the averages obtained in different years was observed in plants having both flanking markers. The candidate region for further characterization of QTLs for yield traits was located on LG01 where the putative QTLs for harvest index were detected on both maps in each of the 5 years. The QTLs identified represent an important improvement in Alpha Acids MAS and the first step towards marker-assisted breeding for hop yield.

Jernej Jakše – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Identification of quantitative trait loci for resistance to Verticillium wilt and yield parameters in hop (Humulus lupulus L.)
    Theoretical and Applied Genetics, 2013
    Co-Authors: Jernej Jakše, Andreja Cerenak, Zlata Luthar, Sebastjan Radisek, Zlatko Satovic, Branka Javornik

    Abstract:

    Verticillium wilt (VW) can cause substantial yield loss in hop particularly with the outbreaks of the lethal strain of Verticillium albo – atrum. To elucidate genetic control of VW resistance in hop, an F_1 mapping population derived from a cross of cultivar Wye Target, with the predicted genetic basis of resistance, and susceptible male breeding line BL2/1 was developed to assess wilting symptoms and to perform QTL mapping. The genetic linkage map, constructed with 203 markers of various types using a pseudo-testcross strategy, formed ten major linkage groups (LG) of the maternal and paternal maps, covering 552.98 and 441.1 cM, respectively. A significant QTL for VW resistance was detected at LOD 7 on a single chromosomal region on LG03 of both parental maps, accounting for 24.2–26.0 % of the phenotypic variance. QTL analysis for AlphaAcid content and yield parameters was also performed on this map. QTLs for these traits were also detected and confirmed our previously detected QTLs in a different pedigree and environment. The work provides the basis for exploration of QTL flanking markers for possible use in marker-assisted selection.

  • Mapping of QTLs for Yield and Alpha Acid Content in Hop
    Acta Horticulturae, 2009
    Co-Authors: Andreja Čerenak, Branka Javornik, Zlatko Šatović, Jernej Jakše, Zlata Luthar, Klaudija Carović-stanko

    Abstract:

    Hop breeding is a lengthy process due to the dioecious nature of hop, producing highly heterozygous offspring and only female plants are of commercial interest. Molecular approaches have therefore been developed to support conventional hop breeding programmes. We studied the effects of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and determined map locations for AlphaAcid content and yield in hop, using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and microsatellite markers (SSRs). Genetic linkage maps were constructed from a mapping population consisting of 111 progeny from a double pseudo-testcross. A total of 194 markers were located on the 20 linkage groups (LGs) of the maternal and paternal maps, covering total map lengths of 706 and 616 cM, respectively. Due to the presence of common biparental SSR markers, homology of LGs between parental maps could be inferred. The progeny segregated quantitatively for AlphaAcid content and yield determined in the years from 2002 – 2006. Several putative QTLs were determined and the results are discussed from the point of view of implementation of a marker-assisted selection (MAS) programme in hop.

  • Identification of QTLs for Alpha Acid content and yield in hop (Humulus Lupulus L.)
    Euphytica, 2009
    Co-Authors: Andreja Čerenak, Zlatko Šatović, Jernej Jakše, Zlata Luthar, Klaudija Carović-stanko, Branka Javornik

    Abstract:

    Amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and microsatellite (SSR) markers were applied to a segregation population of 111 genotypes derived from a pseudo-testcross of hop (Humulus lupulus L.) in order to detect quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for AlphaAcid content and yield traits. A total of 199 markers (150 AFLPs, 43 SSRs, one hypothetical sex marker, five chs genes) were located on the 20 linkage groups (LGs) of the maternal and paternal maps, covering 706 and 616 cM, respectively. Due to the presence of 16 common biparental SSR markers, homology of seven LGs between parental maps could be inferred. The progeny segregated quantitatively for AlphaAcid content and yield determined in the years from 2002–2006. A total of 13 putative QTLs for Alpha Acid content, 13 for dry cone weight and 18 for harvest index were identified on the two maps across years. Possible homologies between the detected QTLs on the two maps as well as in different years were established for all three traits. The most promising QTL for Alpha Acid content was identified on LG03 flanked by two AFLP markers (E-ACC-M-CAA103F*/P-ACA-M-CAC412F). From 13.80 to 36.64% higher content of Alpha Acids than the averages obtained in different years was observed in plants having both flanking markers. The candidate region for further characterization of QTLs for yield traits was located on LG01 where the putative QTLs for harvest index were detected on both maps in each of the 5 years. The QTLs identified represent an important improvement in Alpha Acids MAS and the first step towards marker-assisted breeding for hop yield.

Andreja Čerenak – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Phenotypic and AlphaAcid content diversity of wild hop populations in Croatia
    Plant Soil and Environment, 2018
    Co-Authors: Siniša Srečec, Andreja Čerenak, Vesna Zechner-krpan, Vlatka Petravić-tominac, Zlatko Liber, Zlatko Šatović

    Abstract:

    An ecogeographical survey of wild hop populations was conducted in the northwest of Croatia in two consecutive years. A total of 121 plants was documented on eight locations. Along with the passport data, the data on three phenotypic traits (no. of leaflets, cone shape, aroma) were gathered during collection, while the content of α-Acids in hop cones was determined by lead conductance. Shannon’s information index was calculated for each phenotypic trait and was used as a measure of intra- and inter-population diversity. For all analyzed traits, most of the total phenotypic diversity was attributable to differences among plants within populations. The differences in propor tions of individuals having a particular trait state between all pairs of populations in the case of leaflet number and cone shapes were non-significant. Four out of 28 pairwise comparisons for aroma were proven significant, indicating the existence of differences in proportions of individuals across populations recorded to have ‘typical hoppy’ ‘fine hop’ or ‘rough’ aroma. No significant differences were observed for α-Acids content among populations. Plants exhibiting elongated cone shape had significantly higher α-Acids content than those having oval or round cone shapes. Similarly, plants categorized as ‘rough’ aroma hop cones had the highest content of α-Acids compared with those categorized as ‘typical hoppy’ or ‘fine hop aroma’ hop cones.

  • Environment and weather influence on quality and market value of hops.
    Plant Soil and Environment, 2018
    Co-Authors: Viljem Pavlovic, Andreja Čerenak, Martin Pavlovic, Iztok Jože Košir, Barbara Čeh, Črtomir Rozman, Jernej Turk, Karmen Pazek, Karel Krofta, G. Gregoric

    Abstract:

    The paper analyses the influence of four main weather parameters on AlphaAcid contents for the main hop vari ety Aurora (Super Styrian Aurora) in Slovenian production for the time period 1994–2009. Through inspection of correlation coefficients, it tries to find specific times of the year when the weather conditions affect the AlphaAcid content with a view to prediction in Slovenia. The most significant time periods of weather that influenced the AlphaAcid contents of the Aurora variety during the growing season are identified as attributes of temperatures calculated from the interval from 25 th to 30 th week (T 2530 , r = –0.88, P < 0.01), as attributes of rainfall and sunshine from the interval from 25 th to 29 th week (R 2529 , r = 0.85, P < 0.01 and S 2529 , r = –0.75, P < 0.01) and attributes of relative humidity from the interval from 27 th to 32 nd week (RH 2732 , r = 0.71, P < 0.01). The attribute T 2530 represents the sum of active temperatures from June 18 to July 29 of that year. Similarly, the attribute R 2529 corresponds to the rainfall (in mm or L/m 2 ) that fell during the June 18 to July 22 etc.

  • Mapping of QTLs for Yield and Alpha Acid Content in Hop
    Acta Horticulturae, 2009
    Co-Authors: Andreja Čerenak, Branka Javornik, Zlatko Šatović, Jernej Jakše, Zlata Luthar, Klaudija Carović-stanko

    Abstract:

    Hop breeding is a lengthy process due to the dioecious nature of hop, producing highly heterozygous offspring and only female plants are of commercial interest. Molecular approaches have therefore been developed to support conventional hop breeding programmes. We studied the effects of quantitative trait loci (QTLs) and determined map locations for AlphaAcid content and yield in hop, using amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) and microsatellite markers (SSRs). Genetic linkage maps were constructed from a mapping population consisting of 111 progeny from a double pseudo-testcross. A total of 194 markers were located on the 20 linkage groups (LGs) of the maternal and paternal maps, covering total map lengths of 706 and 616 cM, respectively. Due to the presence of common biparental SSR markers, homology of LGs between parental maps could be inferred. The progeny segregated quantitatively for AlphaAcid content and yield determined in the years from 2002 – 2006. Several putative QTLs were determined and the results are discussed from the point of view of implementation of a marker-assisted selection (MAS) programme in hop.