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Alpha-Linolenic Acid

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Ronald P Mensink – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Conversion of Alpha-Linolenic Acid in humans is influenced by the absolute amounts of Alpha-Linolenic Acid and linoleic Acid in the diet and not by their ratio.
    The American journal of clinical nutrition, 2006
    Co-Authors: Petra L. L. Goyens, Peter L. Zock, Mary E. Spilker, Martijn B. Katan, Ronald P Mensink

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND: Human in vivo data on dietary determinants of Alpha-Linolenic Acid (ALA; 18:3n-3) metabolism are scarce. OBJECTIVE: We examined whether intakes of ALA or linoleic Acid (LA; 18:2n-6) or their ratio influences ALA metabolism. DESIGN: During 4 wk, 29 subjects received a control diet (7% of energy from LA, 0.4% of energy from ALA, ALA-to-LA ratio = 1:19). For the next 6 wk, a control diet, a low-LA diet (3% of energy from LA, 0.4% of energy from ALA, ratio = 1:7), or a high-ALA diet (7% of energy from LA, 1.1% of energy from ALA, ratio = 1:7) was consumed. Ten days before the end of each dietary period, [U-13C]ALA was administered orally for 9 d. ALA oxidation was determined from breath. Conversion was estimated by using compartmental modeling of [13C]- and [12C]n-3 fatty Acid concentrations in fasting plasma phospholipids. RESULTS: Compared with the control group, ALA incorporation into phospholipids increased by 3.6% in the low-LA group (P = 0.012) and decreased by 8.0% in the high-ALA group (P < 0.001). In absolute amounts, it increased by 34.3 mg (P = 0.020) in the low-LA group but hardly changed in the high-ALA group. Nearly all ALA from the plasma phospholipid pool was converted into eicosapentaenoic Acid. Conversion of eicosapentaenoic Acid into docosapentaenoic Acid and docosahexaenoic Acid hardly changed in the 3 groups and was

  • Dietary trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid from deodorised rapeseed oil and plasma lipids and lipoproteins in healthy men: the TransLinE Study.
    British Journal of Nutrition, 2001
    Co-Authors: Susanne H. F. Vermunt, Bernard Beaufrère, Rudolph A Riemersma, Jean-louis Sébédio, Jean-michel Chardigny, Ronald P Mensink

    Abstract:

    : Br J Nutr 2001 Mar;85(3):387-92 Related Articles, Books, LinkOut Comment in: Br J Nutr. 2001 Mar;85(3):249-50. Dietary trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid from deodorised rapeseed oil and plasma lipids and lipoproteins in healthy men: the TransLinE Study. Vermunt SH, Beaufrere B, Riemersma RA, Sebedio JL, Chardigny JM, Mensink RP, TransLinE Investigators a. Maastricht University, Department of Human Biology, Maastricht, The Netherlands. TRANS: isomers of Alpha-Linolenic Acid, which are formed by deodorization of refined vegetable oils, can be found in significant amounts in edible oils. Effects of trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid on plasma lipoproteins are unknown. We therefore investigated the effects of trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid on plasma lipids and lipoproteins in healthy European men. Eighty-eight healthy men from three European countries (France, Scotland, UK and the Netherlands) first consumed for 6 weeks a diet with experimental oils ‘free’ of trans fatty Acids (run-in period). For the next 6 weeks, they were randomly allocated to a diet with experimental oils ‘high’ or ‘low’ in trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid. Daily total trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid intake in the high trans group was 1410 (range 583-2642) mg. Experimental oils were provided as such, or incorporated into margarines, cheeses, muffins and biscuits. The high trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid diet significantly increased the plasma LDL-:HDL-cholesterol ratio by 8.1 % (95 % CI 1.4, 15.3; and the total cholesterol:HDL-cholesterol ratio by 5.1 % (95 % CI 0.4, 9.9; compared with the low-trans diet. This was largely explained by an increase in LDL-cholesterol on the high-trans diet, while no change was observed in the low-trans group (mean treatment effect of 4.7 % (95 % CI -0.8, 10.5; No effects were found on total cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol, triacylglycerols, apolipoprotein B and A-1, and lipoprotein(a) concentrations. In conclusion, trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid may increase plasma LDL-:HDL-cholesterol and total cholesterol:HDL-cholesterol ratios. Whether diet-induced changes in these ratios truly affects the risk for CHD remains to be established.

  • Dietary trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid from deodorised rapeseed oil and plasma lipids and lipoproteins in healthy men: the TransLinE Study.
    The British journal of nutrition, 2001
    Co-Authors: Susanne H. F. Vermunt, Bernard Beaufrère, Rudolph A Riemersma, Jean-louis Sébédio, Jean-michel Chardigny, Ronald P Mensink

    Abstract:

    TRANS: isomers of Alpha-Linolenic Acid, which are formed by deodorization of refined vegetable oils, can be found in significant amounts in edible oils. Effects of trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid on plasma lipoproteins are unknown. We therefore investigated the effects of trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid on plasma lipids and lipoproteins in healthy European men. Eighty-eight healthy men from three European countries (France, Scotland, UK and the Netherlands) first consumed for 6 weeks a diet with experimental oils ‘free’ of trans fatty Acids (run-in period). For the next 6 weeks, they were randomly allocated to a diet with experimental oils ‘high’ or ‘low’ in trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid. Daily total trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid intake in the high trans group was 1410 (range 583-2642) mg. Experimental oils were provided as such, or incorporated into margarines, cheeses, muffins and biscuits. The high trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid diet significantly increased the plasma LDL-:HDL-cholesterol ratio by 8.1 % (95 % CI 1.4, 15.3; and the total cholesterol:HDL-cholesterol ratio by 5.1 % (95 % CI 0.4, 9.9; compared with the low-trans diet. This was largely explained by an increase in LDL-cholesterol on the high-trans diet, while no change was observed in the low-trans group (mean treatment effect of 4.7 % (95 % CI -0.8, 10.5; No effects were found on total cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol, triacylglycerols, apolipoprotein B and A-1, and lipoprotein(a) concentrations. In conclusion, trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid may increase plasma LDL-:HDL-cholesterol and total cholesterol:HDL-cholesterol ratios. Whether diet-induced changes in these ratios truly affects the risk for CHD remains to be established.

Susanne H. F. Vermunt – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Dietary trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid from deodorised rapeseed oil and plasma lipids and lipoproteins in healthy men: the TransLinE Study.
    British Journal of Nutrition, 2001
    Co-Authors: Susanne H. F. Vermunt, Bernard Beaufrère, Rudolph A Riemersma, Jean-louis Sébédio, Jean-michel Chardigny, Ronald P Mensink

    Abstract:

    : Br J Nutr 2001 Mar;85(3):387-92 Related Articles, Books, LinkOut Comment in: Br J Nutr. 2001 Mar;85(3):249-50. Dietary trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid from deodorised rapeseed oil and plasma lipids and lipoproteins in healthy men: the TransLinE Study. Vermunt SH, Beaufrere B, Riemersma RA, Sebedio JL, Chardigny JM, Mensink RP, TransLinE Investigators a. Maastricht University, Department of Human Biology, Maastricht, The Netherlands. TRANS: isomers of Alpha-Linolenic Acid, which are formed by deodorization of refined vegetable oils, can be found in significant amounts in edible oils. Effects of trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid on plasma lipoproteins are unknown. We therefore investigated the effects of trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid on plasma lipids and lipoproteins in healthy European men. Eighty-eight healthy men from three European countries (France, Scotland, UK and the Netherlands) first consumed for 6 weeks a diet with experimental oils ‘free’ of trans fatty Acids (run-in period). For the next 6 weeks, they were randomly allocated to a diet with experimental oils ‘high’ or ‘low’ in trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid. Daily total trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid intake in the high trans group was 1410 (range 583-2642) mg. Experimental oils were provided as such, or incorporated into margarines, cheeses, muffins and biscuits. The high trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid diet significantly increased the plasma LDL-:HDL-cholesterol ratio by 8.1 % (95 % CI 1.4, 15.3; and the total cholesterol:HDL-cholesterol ratio by 5.1 % (95 % CI 0.4, 9.9; compared with the low-trans diet. This was largely explained by an increase in LDL-cholesterol on the high-trans diet, while no change was observed in the low-trans group (mean treatment effect of 4.7 % (95 % CI -0.8, 10.5; No effects were found on total cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol, triacylglycerols, apolipoprotein B and A-1, and lipoprotein(a) concentrations. In conclusion, trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid may increase plasma LDL-:HDL-cholesterol and total cholesterol:HDL-cholesterol ratios. Whether diet-induced changes in these ratios truly affects the risk for CHD remains to be established.

  • Dietary trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid from deodorised rapeseed oil and plasma lipids and lipoproteins in healthy men: the TransLinE Study.
    The British journal of nutrition, 2001
    Co-Authors: Susanne H. F. Vermunt, Bernard Beaufrère, Rudolph A Riemersma, Jean-louis Sébédio, Jean-michel Chardigny, Ronald P Mensink

    Abstract:

    TRANS: isomers of Alpha-Linolenic Acid, which are formed by deodorization of refined vegetable oils, can be found in significant amounts in edible oils. Effects of trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid on plasma lipoproteins are unknown. We therefore investigated the effects of trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid on plasma lipids and lipoproteins in healthy European men. Eighty-eight healthy men from three European countries (France, Scotland, UK and the Netherlands) first consumed for 6 weeks a diet with experimental oils ‘free’ of trans fatty Acids (run-in period). For the next 6 weeks, they were randomly allocated to a diet with experimental oils ‘high’ or ‘low’ in trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid. Daily total trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid intake in the high trans group was 1410 (range 583-2642) mg. Experimental oils were provided as such, or incorporated into margarines, cheeses, muffins and biscuits. The high trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid diet significantly increased the plasma LDL-:HDL-cholesterol ratio by 8.1 % (95 % CI 1.4, 15.3; and the total cholesterol:HDL-cholesterol ratio by 5.1 % (95 % CI 0.4, 9.9; compared with the low-trans diet. This was largely explained by an increase in LDL-cholesterol on the high-trans diet, while no change was observed in the low-trans group (mean treatment effect of 4.7 % (95 % CI -0.8, 10.5; No effects were found on total cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol, triacylglycerols, apolipoprotein B and A-1, and lipoprotein(a) concentrations. In conclusion, trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid may increase plasma LDL-:HDL-cholesterol and total cholesterol:HDL-cholesterol ratios. Whether diet-induced changes in these ratios truly affects the risk for CHD remains to be established.

Jean-michel Chardigny – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The retina is more susceptible than the brain and the liver to the incorporation of trans isomers of DHA in rats consuming trans isomers of Alpha-Linolenic Acid
    Reproduction Nutrition Development, 2006
    Co-Authors: Niyazi Acar, Brigitte Bonhomme, Corinne Joffre, Alain Bron, Catherine Creuzot-garcher, Lionel Bretillon, Michel Doly, Jean-michel Chardigny

    Abstract:

    Trans polyunsaturated fatty Acids are formed during heat treatments of vegetable oils from polyunsaturated fatty Acids containing cis double bonds. After dietary intake, they are distributed in the body and are incorporated into nervous tissues including the retina. Since nervous tissues are known to be rich in n-3 fatty Acids such as docosahexaenoic Acid (DHA), we studied the ability of the retina and the brain to incorporate trans isomers of DHA formed in vivo from the dietary precursor trans$\alpha $-linolenic Acid. Wistar rats were fed with trans isomers of $\alpha $-linolenic Acid for 21 months. A linear incorporation of trans DHA and a decrease in cis DHA was observed in the retina, whereas no major changes were observed in the brain. In parallel to the modifications in retinal cis and trans DHA levels, the retinal functionality evaluated by the electroretinogram showed defects in animals that consumed trans$\alpha $-linolenic Acid. These results suggest that the mechanisms leading to the incorporation of cis and trans fatty Acids are quite different in the retina when compared to the brain and the liver, the retina being more susceptible to changes in the dietary lipid contribution.

  • Dietary trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid from deodorised rapeseed oil and plasma lipids and lipoproteins in healthy men: the TransLinE Study.
    British Journal of Nutrition, 2001
    Co-Authors: Susanne H. F. Vermunt, Bernard Beaufrère, Rudolph A Riemersma, Jean-louis Sébédio, Jean-michel Chardigny, Ronald P Mensink

    Abstract:

    : Br J Nutr 2001 Mar;85(3):387-92 Related Articles, Books, LinkOut Comment in: Br J Nutr. 2001 Mar;85(3):249-50. Dietary trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid from deodorised rapeseed oil and plasma lipids and lipoproteins in healthy men: the TransLinE Study. Vermunt SH, Beaufrere B, Riemersma RA, Sebedio JL, Chardigny JM, Mensink RP, TransLinE Investigators a. Maastricht University, Department of Human Biology, Maastricht, The Netherlands. TRANS: isomers of Alpha-Linolenic Acid, which are formed by deodorization of refined vegetable oils, can be found in significant amounts in edible oils. Effects of trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid on plasma lipoproteins are unknown. We therefore investigated the effects of trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid on plasma lipids and lipoproteins in healthy European men. Eighty-eight healthy men from three European countries (France, Scotland, UK and the Netherlands) first consumed for 6 weeks a diet with experimental oils ‘free’ of trans fatty Acids (run-in period). For the next 6 weeks, they were randomly allocated to a diet with experimental oils ‘high’ or ‘low’ in trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid. Daily total trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid intake in the high trans group was 1410 (range 583-2642) mg. Experimental oils were provided as such, or incorporated into margarines, cheeses, muffins and biscuits. The high trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid diet significantly increased the plasma LDL-:HDL-cholesterol ratio by 8.1 % (95 % CI 1.4, 15.3; and the total cholesterol:HDL-cholesterol ratio by 5.1 % (95 % CI 0.4, 9.9; compared with the low-trans diet. This was largely explained by an increase in LDL-cholesterol on the high-trans diet, while no change was observed in the low-trans group (mean treatment effect of 4.7 % (95 % CI -0.8, 10.5; No effects were found on total cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol, triacylglycerols, apolipoprotein B and A-1, and lipoprotein(a) concentrations. In conclusion, trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid may increase plasma LDL-:HDL-cholesterol and total cholesterol:HDL-cholesterol ratios. Whether diet-induced changes in these ratios truly affects the risk for CHD remains to be established.

  • Dietary trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid from deodorised rapeseed oil and plasma lipids and lipoproteins in healthy men: the TransLinE Study.
    The British journal of nutrition, 2001
    Co-Authors: Susanne H. F. Vermunt, Bernard Beaufrère, Rudolph A Riemersma, Jean-louis Sébédio, Jean-michel Chardigny, Ronald P Mensink

    Abstract:

    TRANS: isomers of Alpha-Linolenic Acid, which are formed by deodorization of refined vegetable oils, can be found in significant amounts in edible oils. Effects of trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid on plasma lipoproteins are unknown. We therefore investigated the effects of trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid on plasma lipids and lipoproteins in healthy European men. Eighty-eight healthy men from three European countries (France, Scotland, UK and the Netherlands) first consumed for 6 weeks a diet with experimental oils ‘free’ of trans fatty Acids (run-in period). For the next 6 weeks, they were randomly allocated to a diet with experimental oils ‘high’ or ‘low’ in trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid. Daily total trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid intake in the high trans group was 1410 (range 583-2642) mg. Experimental oils were provided as such, or incorporated into margarines, cheeses, muffins and biscuits. The high trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid diet significantly increased the plasma LDL-:HDL-cholesterol ratio by 8.1 % (95 % CI 1.4, 15.3; and the total cholesterol:HDL-cholesterol ratio by 5.1 % (95 % CI 0.4, 9.9; compared with the low-trans diet. This was largely explained by an increase in LDL-cholesterol on the high-trans diet, while no change was observed in the low-trans group (mean treatment effect of 4.7 % (95 % CI -0.8, 10.5; No effects were found on total cholesterol and HDL-cholesterol, triacylglycerols, apolipoprotein B and A-1, and lipoprotein(a) concentrations. In conclusion, trans Alpha-Linolenic Acid may increase plasma LDL-:HDL-cholesterol and total cholesterol:HDL-cholesterol ratios. Whether diet-induced changes in these ratios truly affects the risk for CHD remains to be established.