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Ruth C Wilkins – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Development and characterization of an in vitro Alpha Radiation exposure system
    Physics in Medicine and Biology, 2011
    Co-Authors: Lindsay A. Beaton, Trevor J. Stocki, Vinita Chauhan, Trevor A Burn, Ruth C Wilkins
    Abstract:

    A simple in vitro Alpha Radiation exposure system (ARES) was designed to study the biological effects of Alpha particle Radiation. The ARES consists of six 241Am electroplated stainless steel discs with activities averaging 66 kBq and Mylar-based culture dishes to allow the transmission of Alpha particles. The dosimetry of the exposure system was calculated using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit with the source code adapted from the open-source Microbeam example. The average dose rate and linear energy transfer of the system was simulated to be 0.98 ± 0.01 (statistical)+0.18 − 0.00 (systematic) Gy h−1 and 127.4 ± 0.4 (statistical)+23 − 0 (systematic) keV µm−1, respectively. The system was characterized by a comparison of the survival curves of gamma and Alpha irradiated cell lines which showed a relative biological effectiveness of 6.3. This is in good agreement with values obtained using other published Alpha particle exposure systems. Results show that the ARES provides a simple, cost-effective exposure platform for research into the biological effects of Alpha particle Radiation using in vitro modelling of cell cultures.

  • Sci—Thurs AM: YIS—03: Development and Characterization of an in Vitro Alpha Radiation Exposure System for the Purpose of Cell Culture
    Medical Physics, 2009
    Co-Authors: Lindsay A. Beaton, Trevor J. Stocki, Vinita Chauhan, Ruth C Wilkins
    Abstract:

    Radon gas ( 222 Rn ), a major component of background Radiation, is an Alpha emitter with progeny that also emit Alpha particles. It is ubiquitous in our environment and epidemiological studies have shown that exposure to 222 Rn and its progeny have been linked to an increase in lungcancer incidence. To study the biological effects of Alpha Radiation, an in vitro Alpha Radiation Exposure System (ARES) was designed. The ARES consisted of six 241 Am electroplated stainless steel discs with activities averaging 66 kBq and Mylar‐based culture Dishes (MD) to allow the transmission of Alpha particles. The GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit was used for the dosimetry calculations with the source code being adapted from the Microbeam example. The average dose‐rate of the system was simulated and the system was characterized by comparing the clonogenic survival curves from gamma exposures on regular culture dishes to the MD, and then comparing the Alpha exposures to the gamma exposures on the MD.

Lindsay A. Beaton – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Development and characterization of an in vitro Alpha Radiation exposure system
    Physics in Medicine and Biology, 2011
    Co-Authors: Lindsay A. Beaton, Trevor J. Stocki, Vinita Chauhan, Trevor A Burn, Ruth C Wilkins
    Abstract:

    A simple in vitro Alpha Radiation exposure system (ARES) was designed to study the biological effects of Alpha particle Radiation. The ARES consists of six 241Am electroplated stainless steel discs with activities averaging 66 kBq and Mylar-based culture dishes to allow the transmission of Alpha particles. The dosimetry of the exposure system was calculated using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit with the source code adapted from the open-source Microbeam example. The average dose rate and linear energy transfer of the system was simulated to be 0.98 ± 0.01 (statistical)+0.18 − 0.00 (systematic) Gy h−1 and 127.4 ± 0.4 (statistical)+23 − 0 (systematic) keV µm−1, respectively. The system was characterized by a comparison of the survival curves of gamma and Alpha irradiated cell lines which showed a relative biological effectiveness of 6.3. This is in good agreement with values obtained using other published Alpha particle exposure systems. Results show that the ARES provides a simple, cost-effective exposure platform for research into the biological effects of Alpha particle Radiation using in vitro modelling of cell cultures.

  • Sci—Thurs AM: YIS—03: Development and Characterization of an in Vitro Alpha Radiation Exposure System for the Purpose of Cell Culture
    Medical Physics, 2009
    Co-Authors: Lindsay A. Beaton, Trevor J. Stocki, Vinita Chauhan, Ruth C Wilkins
    Abstract:

    Radon gas ( 222 Rn ), a major component of background Radiation, is an Alpha emitter with progeny that also emit Alpha particles. It is ubiquitous in our environment and epidemiological studies have shown that exposure to 222 Rn and its progeny have been linked to an increase in lungcancer incidence. To study the biological effects of Alpha Radiation, an in vitro Alpha Radiation Exposure System (ARES) was designed. The ARES consisted of six 241 Am electroplated stainless steel discs with activities averaging 66 kBq and Mylar‐based culture Dishes (MD) to allow the transmission of Alpha particles. The GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit was used for the dosimetry calculations with the source code being adapted from the Microbeam example. The average dose‐rate of the system was simulated and the system was characterized by comparing the clonogenic survival curves from gamma exposures on regular culture dishes to the MD, and then comparing the Alpha exposures to the gamma exposures on the MD.

J. Seke – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Finite-time deviations from exponential decay for the Lyman-. Alpha. Radiation in the Dirac hydrogen atom without ignoring virtual transitions
    Physical Review A, 1992
    Co-Authors: J. Seke
    Abstract:

    By using a self-consistent projection-operator method, developed recently by the author, finite-time deviations from exponential decay for the Lyman-{Alpha} Radiation in the Dirac hydrogen atom are calculated without neglecting retardation and virtual-transition effects.

  • Finite-time deviations from exponential decay for the Lyman- Alpha Radiation in the Dirac hydrogen atom without ignoring virtual transitions.
    Physical review. A Atomic molecular and optical physics, 1992
    Co-Authors: J. Seke
    Abstract:

    By using a self-consistent projection-operator method, developed recently by the author, finite-time deviations from exponential decay for the Lyman-\ensuremath{\Alpha} Radiation in the Dirac hydrogen atom are calculated without neglecting retardation and virtual-transition effects.

Vinita Chauhan – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Development and characterization of an in vitro Alpha Radiation exposure system
    Physics in Medicine and Biology, 2011
    Co-Authors: Lindsay A. Beaton, Trevor J. Stocki, Vinita Chauhan, Trevor A Burn, Ruth C Wilkins
    Abstract:

    A simple in vitro Alpha Radiation exposure system (ARES) was designed to study the biological effects of Alpha particle Radiation. The ARES consists of six 241Am electroplated stainless steel discs with activities averaging 66 kBq and Mylar-based culture dishes to allow the transmission of Alpha particles. The dosimetry of the exposure system was calculated using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit with the source code adapted from the open-source Microbeam example. The average dose rate and linear energy transfer of the system was simulated to be 0.98 ± 0.01 (statistical)+0.18 − 0.00 (systematic) Gy h−1 and 127.4 ± 0.4 (statistical)+23 − 0 (systematic) keV µm−1, respectively. The system was characterized by a comparison of the survival curves of gamma and Alpha irradiated cell lines which showed a relative biological effectiveness of 6.3. This is in good agreement with values obtained using other published Alpha particle exposure systems. Results show that the ARES provides a simple, cost-effective exposure platform for research into the biological effects of Alpha particle Radiation using in vitro modelling of cell cultures.

  • Sci—Thurs AM: YIS—03: Development and Characterization of an in Vitro Alpha Radiation Exposure System for the Purpose of Cell Culture
    Medical Physics, 2009
    Co-Authors: Lindsay A. Beaton, Trevor J. Stocki, Vinita Chauhan, Ruth C Wilkins
    Abstract:

    Radon gas ( 222 Rn ), a major component of background Radiation, is an Alpha emitter with progeny that also emit Alpha particles. It is ubiquitous in our environment and epidemiological studies have shown that exposure to 222 Rn and its progeny have been linked to an increase in lungcancer incidence. To study the biological effects of Alpha Radiation, an in vitro Alpha Radiation Exposure System (ARES) was designed. The ARES consisted of six 241 Am electroplated stainless steel discs with activities averaging 66 kBq and Mylar‐based culture Dishes (MD) to allow the transmission of Alpha particles. The GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit was used for the dosimetry calculations with the source code being adapted from the Microbeam example. The average dose‐rate of the system was simulated and the system was characterized by comparing the clonogenic survival curves from gamma exposures on regular culture dishes to the MD, and then comparing the Alpha exposures to the gamma exposures on the MD.

Trevor J. Stocki – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Development and characterization of an in vitro Alpha Radiation exposure system
    Physics in Medicine and Biology, 2011
    Co-Authors: Lindsay A. Beaton, Trevor J. Stocki, Vinita Chauhan, Trevor A Burn, Ruth C Wilkins
    Abstract:

    A simple in vitro Alpha Radiation exposure system (ARES) was designed to study the biological effects of Alpha particle Radiation. The ARES consists of six 241Am electroplated stainless steel discs with activities averaging 66 kBq and Mylar-based culture dishes to allow the transmission of Alpha particles. The dosimetry of the exposure system was calculated using the GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit with the source code adapted from the open-source Microbeam example. The average dose rate and linear energy transfer of the system was simulated to be 0.98 ± 0.01 (statistical)+0.18 − 0.00 (systematic) Gy h−1 and 127.4 ± 0.4 (statistical)+23 − 0 (systematic) keV µm−1, respectively. The system was characterized by a comparison of the survival curves of gamma and Alpha irradiated cell lines which showed a relative biological effectiveness of 6.3. This is in good agreement with values obtained using other published Alpha particle exposure systems. Results show that the ARES provides a simple, cost-effective exposure platform for research into the biological effects of Alpha particle Radiation using in vitro modelling of cell cultures.

  • Sci—Thurs AM: YIS—03: Development and Characterization of an in Vitro Alpha Radiation Exposure System for the Purpose of Cell Culture
    Medical Physics, 2009
    Co-Authors: Lindsay A. Beaton, Trevor J. Stocki, Vinita Chauhan, Ruth C Wilkins
    Abstract:

    Radon gas ( 222 Rn ), a major component of background Radiation, is an Alpha emitter with progeny that also emit Alpha particles. It is ubiquitous in our environment and epidemiological studies have shown that exposure to 222 Rn and its progeny have been linked to an increase in lungcancer incidence. To study the biological effects of Alpha Radiation, an in vitro Alpha Radiation Exposure System (ARES) was designed. The ARES consisted of six 241 Am electroplated stainless steel discs with activities averaging 66 kBq and Mylar‐based culture Dishes (MD) to allow the transmission of Alpha particles. The GEANT4 Monte Carlo simulation toolkit was used for the dosimetry calculations with the source code being adapted from the Microbeam example. The average dose‐rate of the system was simulated and the system was characterized by comparing the clonogenic survival curves from gamma exposures on regular culture dishes to the MD, and then comparing the Alpha exposures to the gamma exposures on the MD.