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Alpha Wave

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Alpha Wave – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Wolfgang Klimesch – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Lexical access and evoked traveling Alpha Waves
    NeuroImage, 2014
    Co-Authors: Andrea Zauner, Walter Gruber, Nicole Alexandra Himmelstoß, Julia Lechinger, Wolfgang Klimesch

    Abstract:

    Retrieval from semantic memory is usually considered within a time window around 300–600 ms. Here we suggest that lexical access already occurs at around 100 ms. This interpretation is based on the finding that semantically rich and frequent words exhibit a significantly shorter topographical latency difference between the site with the shortest P1 latency (leading site) and that with the longest P1 latency (trailing site). This latency difference can be described in terms of an evoked traveling Alpha Wave as was already shown in earlier studies.

  • Evoked traveling Alpha Waves predict visual-semantic categorization-speed
    NeuroImage, 2011
    Co-Authors: Robert Fellinger, Andrea Zauner, Walter Gruber, Roman Freunberger, Wolfgang Klimesch

    Abstract:

    In the present study we have tested the hypothesis that evoked traveling Alpha Waves are behaviorally significant. The results of a visual-semantic categorization task show that three early ERP components including the P1–N1 complex had a dominant frequency characteristic in the Alpha range and behaved like traveling Waves do. They exhibited a traveling direction from midline occipital to right lateral parietal sites. Phase analyses revealed that this traveling behavior of ERP components could be explained by phase-delays in the Alpha but not theta and beta frequency range. Most importantly, we found that the speed of the traveling Alpha Wave was significantly and negatively correlated with reaction time indicating that slow traveling speed was associated with fast picture-categorization. We conclude that evoked Alpha oscillations are functionally associated with early access to visual-semantic information and generate – or at least modulate – the early Waveforms of the visual ERP.

  • pre stimulus Alpha phase alignment predicts p1 amplitude
    Brain Research Bulletin, 2011
    Co-Authors: Robert Fellinger, Wolfgang Klimesch, Walter Gruber, Roman Freunberger, Michael Doppelmayr

    Abstract:

    Since years there is a hotly discussed dispute whether event-related potentials are either generated by an evoked component or by resetting of ongoing phase. We argue that phase-reset must not be proven in order to accept the general involvement of phase in ERP-generation as it is only one of several possible mechanisms influencing or generating certain ERP-components. Supporting data are presented showing that positive peaks of ongoing pre-stimulus Alpha activity are not randomly distributed in time across trials. Most importantly, we found that a certain kind of pre-stimulus phase concentration that represents a continuous development of an Alpha Wave up to the time window where the P1 is generated is associated with an enlarged event-related component. We conclude that ongoing oscillations cannot be considered random background noise (even before stimulus onset) and that there are probably more phase-mechanisms that can contribute to the ERP-generation.

Walter Gruber – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Lexical access and evoked traveling Alpha Waves
    NeuroImage, 2014
    Co-Authors: Andrea Zauner, Walter Gruber, Nicole Alexandra Himmelstoß, Julia Lechinger, Wolfgang Klimesch

    Abstract:

    Retrieval from semantic memory is usually considered within a time window around 300–600 ms. Here we suggest that lexical access already occurs at around 100 ms. This interpretation is based on the finding that semantically rich and frequent words exhibit a significantly shorter topographical latency difference between the site with the shortest P1 latency (leading site) and that with the longest P1 latency (trailing site). This latency difference can be described in terms of an evoked traveling Alpha Wave as was already shown in earlier studies.

  • Evoked traveling Alpha Waves predict visual-semantic categorization-speed
    NeuroImage, 2011
    Co-Authors: Robert Fellinger, Andrea Zauner, Walter Gruber, Roman Freunberger, Wolfgang Klimesch

    Abstract:

    In the present study we have tested the hypothesis that evoked traveling Alpha Waves are behaviorally significant. The results of a visual-semantic categorization task show that three early ERP components including the P1–N1 complex had a dominant frequency characteristic in the Alpha range and behaved like traveling Waves do. They exhibited a traveling direction from midline occipital to right lateral parietal sites. Phase analyses revealed that this traveling behavior of ERP components could be explained by phase-delays in the Alpha but not theta and beta frequency range. Most importantly, we found that the speed of the traveling Alpha Wave was significantly and negatively correlated with reaction time indicating that slow traveling speed was associated with fast picture-categorization. We conclude that evoked Alpha oscillations are functionally associated with early access to visual-semantic information and generate – or at least modulate – the early Waveforms of the visual ERP.

  • pre stimulus Alpha phase alignment predicts p1 amplitude
    Brain Research Bulletin, 2011
    Co-Authors: Robert Fellinger, Wolfgang Klimesch, Walter Gruber, Roman Freunberger, Michael Doppelmayr

    Abstract:

    Since years there is a hotly discussed dispute whether event-related potentials are either generated by an evoked component or by resetting of ongoing phase. We argue that phase-reset must not be proven in order to accept the general involvement of phase in ERP-generation as it is only one of several possible mechanisms influencing or generating certain ERP-components. Supporting data are presented showing that positive peaks of ongoing pre-stimulus Alpha activity are not randomly distributed in time across trials. Most importantly, we found that a certain kind of pre-stimulus phase concentration that represents a continuous development of an Alpha Wave up to the time window where the P1 is generated is associated with an enlarged event-related component. We conclude that ongoing oscillations cannot be considered random background noise (even before stimulus onset) and that there are probably more phase-mechanisms that can contribute to the ERP-generation.

Robert Fellinger – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Evoked traveling Alpha Waves predict visual-semantic categorization-speed
    NeuroImage, 2011
    Co-Authors: Robert Fellinger, Andrea Zauner, Walter Gruber, Roman Freunberger, Wolfgang Klimesch

    Abstract:

    In the present study we have tested the hypothesis that evoked traveling Alpha Waves are behaviorally significant. The results of a visual-semantic categorization task show that three early ERP components including the P1–N1 complex had a dominant frequency characteristic in the Alpha range and behaved like traveling Waves do. They exhibited a traveling direction from midline occipital to right lateral parietal sites. Phase analyses revealed that this traveling behavior of ERP components could be explained by phase-delays in the Alpha but not theta and beta frequency range. Most importantly, we found that the speed of the traveling Alpha Wave was significantly and negatively correlated with reaction time indicating that slow traveling speed was associated with fast picture-categorization. We conclude that evoked Alpha oscillations are functionally associated with early access to visual-semantic information and generate – or at least modulate – the early Waveforms of the visual ERP.

  • pre stimulus Alpha phase alignment predicts p1 amplitude
    Brain Research Bulletin, 2011
    Co-Authors: Robert Fellinger, Wolfgang Klimesch, Walter Gruber, Roman Freunberger, Michael Doppelmayr

    Abstract:

    Since years there is a hotly discussed dispute whether event-related potentials are either generated by an evoked component or by resetting of ongoing phase. We argue that phase-reset must not be proven in order to accept the general involvement of phase in ERP-generation as it is only one of several possible mechanisms influencing or generating certain ERP-components. Supporting data are presented showing that positive peaks of ongoing pre-stimulus Alpha activity are not randomly distributed in time across trials. Most importantly, we found that a certain kind of pre-stimulus phase concentration that represents a continuous development of an Alpha Wave up to the time window where the P1 is generated is associated with an enlarged event-related component. We conclude that ongoing oscillations cannot be considered random background noise (even before stimulus onset) and that there are probably more phase-mechanisms that can contribute to the ERP-generation.