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Alpine Orogeny

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Emmanuel John M Carranza – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • the ore genesis of the jebel mecella and sidi taya f ba zn pb mississippi valley type deposits fluorite zaghouan province ne tunisia in relation to Alpine Orogeny constraints from geological sulfur and lead isotope studies
    Comptes Rendus Geoscience, 2019
    Co-Authors: Nejib Jemmali, Emmanuel John M Carranza, Larbi Rddad, Fouad Souissi

    Abstract:

    Abstract Jebel Mecella and Sidi Taya F–(Ba Pb Zn) deposits are located within the Fluorite Zaghouan Province (NE Tunisia). The mineralization occurs along the unconformity surface between the Jurassic limestones and Upper Cretaceous rocks. The mineralization consists mainly of fluorite, barite, sphalerite, and galena. The δ34S values of barite at Jebel Mecella (14.8–15.4‰) and at Sidi Taya (21.6–22.2‰) closely match those of the Triassic evaporites and Messinian seawater, respectively. The range of δ34S values of galena and sphalerite in both deposits (−6.9 to +2.4‰) suggests the involvement of thermochemical sulfate reduction and possibly organically-bound sulfur in the generation of sulfur. Lead isotope data with 206Pb/204Pb, 207Pb/204Pb, and 208Pb/204Pb ratios of 18.893–18.903, 15.684–15.699, and 38.850–38.880, respectively suggests a single homogeneous source reservoir of Paleozoic age and/or the homogenization of the Paleozoic–Cretaceous multireservoir-derived fluids along their long migration paths to the loci of deposition during the Alpine Orogeny.

Jose Maria Tubia – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • post variscan basin evolution in the central pyrenees insights from the stephanian permian anayet basin
    Comptes Rendus Geoscience, 2016
    Co-Authors: Lidia Rodriguezmendez, Julia Cuevas, Jose Maria Tubia

    Abstract:

    Abstract The Anayet Basin, in the central Pyrenees, records a Stephanian–Permian continental succession including three Permian volcanic episodes. The absolute chronology of these rocks has allowed us to better constrain the early post-Variscan evolution of the Pyrenees. The transtensional regime responsible for the formation of the pull-apart Anayet Basin began at least in Stephanian times, the age of the first post-Variscan deposits in the area, and lasted until Late Permian. During Middle Eocene times, the Alpine Orogeny inverted the Anayet Basin and led to the formation of south-vergent chevron folds and axial plane penetrative cleavage.

  • Post-Variscan basin evolution in the central Pyrenees: Insights from the Stephanian–Permian Anayet Basin
    Comptes Rendus Geoscience, 2016
    Co-Authors: Lidia Rodríguez-méndez, Julia Cuevas, Jose Maria Tubia

    Abstract:

    Abstract The Anayet Basin, in the central Pyrenees, records a Stephanian–Permian continental succession including three Permian volcanic episodes. The absolute chronology of these rocks has allowed us to better constrain the early post-Variscan evolution of the Pyrenees. The transtensional regime responsible for the formation of the pull-apart Anayet Basin began at least in Stephanian times, the age of the first post-Variscan deposits in the area, and lasted until Late Permian. During Middle Eocene times, the Alpine Orogeny inverted the Anayet Basin and led to the formation of south-vergent chevron folds and axial plane penetrative cleavage.

  • Post-Variscan basin evolution in the central Pyrenees: Insights from the Stephanian–Permian Anayet Basin
    Comptes Rendus Geoscience, 2016
    Co-Authors: Lidia Rodríguez-méndez, Julia Cuevas, Jose Maria Tubia

    Abstract:

    Abstract The Anayet Basin, in the central Pyrenees, records a Stephanian–Permian continental succession including three Permian volcanic episodes. The absolute chronology of these rocks has allowed us to better constrain the early post-Variscan evolution of the Pyrenees. The transtensional regime responsible for the formation of the pull-apart Anayet Basin began at least in Stephanian times, the age of the first post-Variscan deposits in the area, and lasted until Late Permian. During Middle Eocene times, the Alpine Orogeny inverted the Anayet Basin and led to the formation of south-vergent chevron folds and axial plane penetrative cleavage.

Othmar Müntener – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Current challenges for explaining (ultra)high‐pressure tectonism in the Pennine domain of the Central and Western Alps
    Journal of Metamorphic Geology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Filippo Schenker, Stefan M. Schmalholz, Evangelos Moulas, Jean Pleuger, Lukas P. Baumgartner, Yuri Y. Podladchikov, Johannes C. Vrijmoed, N. Buchs, Othmar Müntener

    Abstract:

    The Pennine domain of the Central and Western (PCW) Alps, including the Dora-Maira, Monte Rosa, Gran Paradiso, Adula/Cima Lunga nappes and the Zermatt-Saas zone underwent ultrahigh- or high-pressure [(U)HP >1.5 GPa] metamorphism during the Alpine Orogeny. We review structural, petrological and geochronological data for the (U)HP units in the PCW Alps (i) to clarify the relationship
    between (U)HP metamorphism and deformation, (ii) to confront published exhumation models for the (U)HP units with the reviewed data and (iii) to evaluate consequences of different pre-Alpine paleogeographic settings (Penrose-type ocean v. hyperextended margins) on the Alpine Orogeny. The review indicates that (i) peak pressures are recorded only in minor volumes of the corresponding tectonic nappes; (ii) (U)HP rocks occur within coherent and imbricate thrust sheets which show substantial pressure jumps; (iii) peak pressures are mostly associated with a top-to-the-foreland kinematics; (iv) decompression from (U)HP (4 to >1.5 GPa) to greenschist or amphibolite facies (~1 GPa) metamorphic conditions was fast ( ~3180 kg m3) rocks is questionable, because there is no evidence of such rocks around the (U)HP units. An alternative model, which could explain the main characteristics of the (U)HP units in the PCW Alps, is an orogenic wedge model that (i) involves dynamic stresses deviating from lithostatic pressure and (ii) is formed during the convergence of hyperextended margins. Deviations of dynamic stresses from the lithostatic pressure and local pressure variations cannot be excluded during the Alpine Orogeny, but these deviations and variations have not been clearly identified until now.