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Alternaria citri

The Experts below are selected from a list of 252 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Mohammad Jamal Saharkhiz – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Effect of Zataria multiflora Boiss and Thymus vulgaris L. essential oils on black rot of ‘Washington Navel’ orange fruit
    Postharvest Biology and Technology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Asghar Ramezanian, Moslem Azadi, Reza Mostowfizadeh-ghalamfarsa, Mohammad Jamal Saharkhiz

    Abstract:

    Abstract This research was conducted to investigate the effects of Zataria multiflora and Thymus vulgaris essential oils on Alternaria decay (black rot) development and quality traits of ‘Washington Navel’ oranges both in vitro incubated at 25 °C for 7 days and in vivo​ at 5 °C for 60 days. Based on the results obtained from GC–MS analysis, thymol, carvacrol and para-cymene were the most abundant of all constituents in EO extracts of Z. multiflora and T. vulgaris. Alternaria citri growth was completely prevented at 300 and 400 μl l−1 in vitro concentrations of Z. multiflora and T. vulgaris ​EOs, respectively. Moreover, the fungal growth steadily decreased with increasing EOs concentration. Similar results were obtained from in vivo assays with 300 μl l−1 Z. multiflora EO and 400 μl l−1 T. vulgaris EO which showed the best effects in preventing fruit decay, without impairing fruit quality traits such as visual appearance, weight loss, firmness, peel color parameters (hue angle, chroma, and lightness), and juice chemical characteristics (endopolygalacturonase enzyme activity, antioxidant activity, total phenols, ascorbic acid and carotenoid content). The greater efficiency of Z. multiflora compared with T. vulgaris EO may be due to its higher concentration of the main constituents, especially thymol and carvacrol. Overall, Both Z. multiflora and T. vulgaris EOs could be an alternative to chemical fungicides without health risks for preserving orange fruit during cold storage.

  • Effect of Zataria multiflora Boiss and Thymus vulgaris L. essential oils on black rot of ‘Washington Navel’ orange fruit
    Postharvest Biology and Technology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Asghar Ramezanian, Moslem Azadi, Reza Mostowfizadeh-ghalamfarsa, Mohammad Jamal Saharkhiz

    Abstract:

    This research was conducted to investigate the effects of Zataria multiflora and Thymus vulgaris essential oils on Alternaria decay (black rot) development and quality traits of ‘Washington Navel’ oranges both in vitro incubated at 25°C for 7 days and in vivo at 5°C for 60 days. Based on the results obtained from GC-MS analysis, thymol, carvacrol and para-cymene were the most abundant of all constituents in EO extracts of Z. multiflora and T. vulgaris. Alternaria citri growth was completely prevented at 300 and 400μll-1in vitro concentrations of Z. multiflora and T. vulgaris EOs, respectively. Moreover, the fungal growth steadily decreased with increasing EOs concentration. Similar results were obtained from in vivo assays with 300μll-1Z. multiflora EO and 400μll-1T. vulgaris EO which showed the best effects in preventing fruit decay, without impairing fruit quality traits such as visual appearance, weight loss, firmness, peel color parameters (hue angle, chroma, and lightness), and juice chemical characteristics (endopolygalacturonase enzyme activity, antioxidant activity, total phenols, ascorbic acid and carotenoid content). The greater efficiency of Z. multiflora compared with T. vulgaris EO may be due to its higher concentration of the main constituents, especially thymol and carvacrol. Overall, Both Z. multiflora and T. vulgaris EOs could be an alternative to chemical fungicides without health risks for preserving orange fruit during cold storage.

Kazuya Akimitsu – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Cloning and Sequence Analysis of Endopolygalacturonase Genes in Venturia nashicola and Venturia pirina
    Jarq-japan Agricultural Research Quarterly, 2011
    Co-Authors: Hiroshi Katoh, Kazuya Akimitsu, Ayumi Yamada, Hideo Ishii

    Abstract:

    Genes encoding endopolygalacturonase (endoPG) were isolated from pathogens of the Asian pear scab, Venturia nashicola races 1, 2, 3, and 4, and European pear scab, V. pirina. The Vnpgr1 gene of the V. nashicola race 1 consists of a 1,116-bp open reading frame, encoding a protein of 372 amino acids with an estimated molecular mass of 37.5 kDa and an isoelectric point (pI) of 6.56. The sequences of Vnpg genes from different races and Vppg gene from V. pirina showed high identities (95-100%). The deduced amino acid sequence of the V. nashicola race 1 endoPG showed 63-68% identity to the endoPG sequences of Penicillium olsonii, Colletotrichum lindemuthianum, Cryphonectria parasitica, Fusarium oxysporum, Sclerotinia sclerotiorum, and Alternaria citri. The deduced amino acid sequence of the race 1 endoPG was identical to the N-terminal amino acid sequence of the previously purified endoPG enzyme from the mycelia of this race. The results of a southern blot analysis indicated that V. nashicola race 1 (isolate JS-115) had a single copy of the Vnpgr1. Restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) analysis of the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) products of the endoPG gene digested with HincII, BspEI, and BsrGI was performed; thereafter, agarose gel electrophoresis yielded race-specific RFLP patterns.

  • overexpression of citrus polygalacturonase inhibiting protein in citrus black rot pathogen Alternaria citri
    Journal of Plant Physiology, 2007
    Co-Authors: Hiroshi Katoh, Hiroyuki Yamamoto, Sarunya Nalumpang, Kazuya Akimitsu

    Abstract:

    The rough lemon (Citrus jambhiri) gene encoding polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein (RlemPGIPA) was overexpressed in the pathogenic fungus Alternaria citri. The overexpression mutant AcOPI6 retained the ability to utilize pectin as a sole carbon source, and the overexpression of polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein did not have any effect on the growth of AcOPI6 in potato dextrose and pectin medium. The pathogenicity of AcOPI6 to cause a black rot symptom in citrus fruits was also unchanged. Polygalacturonase-inhibiting protein was secreted together with endopolygalacturonase into culture filtrates of AcOPI6, and oligogalacturonides were digested from polygalacturonic acid by both proteins in the culture filtrates. The reaction mixture containing oligogalacturonides possessed activity for induction of defense-related gene, RlemLOX, in rough lemon leaves.

  • overexpression of a gene encoding a catabolite repression element in Alternaria citri causes severe symptoms of black rot in citrus fruit
    Phytopathology, 2007
    Co-Authors: Hiroshi Katoh, Hiroyuki Yamamoto, Kouhei Ohtani, Kazuya Akimitsu

    Abstract:

    Katoh, H., Ohtani, K., Yamamoto, H., and Akimitsu, K. 2007. Overexpression of a gene encoding a catabolite repression element in Alternaria citri causes severe symptoms of black rot in citrus fruit. Phytopathology 97:557-563. A gene (AcCreA) encoding a catabolite repression element (CreA) with two zinc fingers of the Cys2His2 type was isolated from the postharvest fungal pathogen Alternaria citri. The AcCreA overexpression mutant AcOEC2 of A. citri showed normal growth on pectin medium and on segments of peel or the juice sac area from citrus fruit. Production of endopolygalacturonase, an essential virulence factor of this pathogen, was similar in AcOEC2 and the wild type in pectin-containing media. However, addition of glucose to the medium showed that carbon catabolite repression of endopolygalacturonase gene (Acpg1) expression, as well as endopolygalacturonase production, was lost in AcOEC2. The wild-type strain of A. citri causes rot mainly in the central axis of citrus fruit without development of rotting in the juice sac area; however, AcOEC2 caused severe black rot symptoms in both the central axis and juice sac areas. These results indicate that AcCreA-mediated catabolite repression controls the virulence or infection of this pathogen, and that the wild-type A. citri does not cause symptoms in the juice sac area due to carbon catabolite repression by sugars in the juice of the juice sac area.

Asghar Ramezanian – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Effect of Zataria multiflora Boiss and Thymus vulgaris L. essential oils on black rot of ‘Washington Navel’ orange fruit
    Postharvest Biology and Technology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Asghar Ramezanian, Moslem Azadi, Reza Mostowfizadeh-ghalamfarsa, Mohammad Jamal Saharkhiz

    Abstract:

    Abstract This research was conducted to investigate the effects of Zataria multiflora and Thymus vulgaris essential oils on Alternaria decay (black rot) development and quality traits of ‘Washington Navel’ oranges both in vitro incubated at 25 °C for 7 days and in vivo​ at 5 °C for 60 days. Based on the results obtained from GC–MS analysis, thymol, carvacrol and para-cymene were the most abundant of all constituents in EO extracts of Z. multiflora and T. vulgaris. Alternaria citri growth was completely prevented at 300 and 400 μl l−1 in vitro concentrations of Z. multiflora and T. vulgaris ​EOs, respectively. Moreover, the fungal growth steadily decreased with increasing EOs concentration. Similar results were obtained from in vivo assays with 300 μl l−1 Z. multiflora EO and 400 μl l−1 T. vulgaris EO which showed the best effects in preventing fruit decay, without impairing fruit quality traits such as visual appearance, weight loss, firmness, peel color parameters (hue angle, chroma, and lightness), and juice chemical characteristics (endopolygalacturonase enzyme activity, antioxidant activity, total phenols, ascorbic acid and carotenoid content). The greater efficiency of Z. multiflora compared with T. vulgaris EO may be due to its higher concentration of the main constituents, especially thymol and carvacrol. Overall, Both Z. multiflora and T. vulgaris EOs could be an alternative to chemical fungicides without health risks for preserving orange fruit during cold storage.

  • Effect of Zataria multiflora Boiss and Thymus vulgaris L. essential oils on black rot of ‘Washington Navel’ orange fruit
    Postharvest Biology and Technology, 2016
    Co-Authors: Asghar Ramezanian, Moslem Azadi, Reza Mostowfizadeh-ghalamfarsa, Mohammad Jamal Saharkhiz

    Abstract:

    This research was conducted to investigate the effects of Zataria multiflora and Thymus vulgaris essential oils on Alternaria decay (black rot) development and quality traits of ‘Washington Navel’ oranges both in vitro incubated at 25°C for 7 days and in vivo at 5°C for 60 days. Based on the results obtained from GC-MS analysis, thymol, carvacrol and para-cymene were the most abundant of all constituents in EO extracts of Z. multiflora and T. vulgaris. Alternaria citri growth was completely prevented at 300 and 400μll-1in vitro concentrations of Z. multiflora and T. vulgaris EOs, respectively. Moreover, the fungal growth steadily decreased with increasing EOs concentration. Similar results were obtained from in vivo assays with 300μll-1Z. multiflora EO and 400μll-1T. vulgaris EO which showed the best effects in preventing fruit decay, without impairing fruit quality traits such as visual appearance, weight loss, firmness, peel color parameters (hue angle, chroma, and lightness), and juice chemical characteristics (endopolygalacturonase enzyme activity, antioxidant activity, total phenols, ascorbic acid and carotenoid content). The greater efficiency of Z. multiflora compared with T. vulgaris EO may be due to its higher concentration of the main constituents, especially thymol and carvacrol. Overall, Both Z. multiflora and T. vulgaris EOs could be an alternative to chemical fungicides without health risks for preserving orange fruit during cold storage.