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Yuqi Gao – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • A hypothesis study on a four-period prevention model for high Altitude Disease.
    Military Medical Research, 2018
    Co-Authors: Xian-sheng Liu, Xiang-rong Yang, Lu Liu, Xian-kui Qin, Yuqi Gao

    Abstract:

    High Altitude Disease (HAD) can reduce combat effectiveness and damage the health of soldiers at high Altitudes. The objective of this hypothesis study is to build a four-period prevention model for high Altitude Disease that can be applied at high Altitudes of over 3000 m. We divided the time at high Altitude into nine periods, with three stages from the ascent preparation to the descent to the plain, and applied a continuous dynamic and systematic four-period prevention model across the nine periods. Each period of three stages has its own different measures and targets high Altitude health care services for the prevention of high Altitude Disease. A standard four-period prevention model for high Altitude Disease was constructed for the high Altitude health services at the population level. Our hypothesized HAD prevention model represents a continuous dynamic and systematic four-period prevention model across the nine periods. This hypothesis can be tested from three aspects. The first one isassessment of soldiers’ operating efficacies. The second is comparison of the long-term high Altitude population health basic data and development and utilization of big data. The third is descent population health status comparative study and historical retrospective study on prevention. As we know, it is necessary to protect soldiers’ health through the ascent and descent. Through the standard four-period model, we can protect soldiers’ health by preventing high Altitude Diseases, screening the susceptible population, securely tracking their location and maintaining soldiers’ health statuses; we also maintain their operational capabilities, eliminate their psychological fears and ease their family troubles.

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  • ome on the range update on high Altitude acclimatization adaptation and Disease
    Molecular BioSystems, 2014
    Co-Authors: Yongjun Luo, Yuxiao Wang, Yuqi Gao

    Abstract:

    The main physiological challenge in high-Altitude plateau environments is hypoxia. When people living in a plain environment migrate to the plateau, they face the threat of hypoxia. Most people can acclimatize to high Altitudes; the acclimatization process mainly consists of short-term hyperventilation and long-term compensation by increased oxygen uptake, transport, and use due to increased red blood cell mass, myoglobin, and mitochondria. If individuals cannot acclimatize to high Altitude, they may suffer from a high-Altitude Disease, such as acute mountain Disease (AMS), high-Altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE), high-Altitude cerebral edema (HACE) or chronic mountain sickness (CMS). Because some individuals are more susceptible to high Altitude Diseases than others, the incidence of these high-Altitude Diseases is variable and cannot be predicted. Studying “omes” using genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, transcriptomics, lipidomics, immunomics, glycomics and RNomics can help us understand the factors that mediate susceptibility to high Altitude illnesses. Moreover, analysis of the “omes” using a systems biology approach may provide a greater understanding of high-Altitude illness pathogenesis and improve the efficiency of the diagnosis and treatment of high-Altitude illnesses in the future. Below, we summarize the current literature regarding the role of “omes” in high-Altitude acclimatization/adaptation and Disease and discuss key research gaps to better understand the contribution of “omes” to high-Altitude illness susceptibility.

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  • ‘Ome’ on the range: update on high-Altitude acclimatization/adaptation and Disease
    Mol. BioSyst., 2014
    Co-Authors: Yongjun Luo, Yuxiao Wang, Yuqi Gao

    Abstract:

    The main physiological challenge in high-Altitude plateau environments is hypoxia. When people living in a plain environment migrate to the plateau, they face the threat of hypoxia. Most people can acclimatize to high Altitudes; the acclimatization process mainly consists of short-term hyperventilation and long-term compensation by increased oxygen uptake, transport, and use due to increased red blood cell mass, myoglobin, and mitochondria. If individuals cannot acclimatize to high Altitude, they may suffer from a high-Altitude Disease, such as acute mountain Disease (AMS), high-Altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE), high-Altitude cerebral edema (HACE) or chronic mountain sickness (CMS). Because some individuals are more susceptible to high Altitude Diseases than others, the incidence of these high-Altitude Diseases is variable and cannot be predicted. Studying “omes” using genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, transcriptomics, lipidomics, immunomics, glycomics and RNomics can help us understand the factors that mediate susceptibility to high Altitude illnesses. Moreover, analysis of the “omes” using a systems biology approach may provide a greater understanding of high-Altitude illness pathogenesis and improve the efficiency of the diagnosis and treatment of high-Altitude illnesses in the future. Below, we summarize the current literature regarding the role of “omes” in high-Altitude acclimatization/adaptation and Disease and discuss key research gaps to better understand the contribution of “omes” to high-Altitude illness susceptibility.

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Yongjun Luo – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • ome on the range update on high Altitude acclimatization adaptation and Disease
    Molecular BioSystems, 2014
    Co-Authors: Yongjun Luo, Yuxiao Wang, Yuqi Gao

    Abstract:

    The main physiological challenge in high-Altitude plateau environments is hypoxia. When people living in a plain environment migrate to the plateau, they face the threat of hypoxia. Most people can acclimatize to high Altitudes; the acclimatization process mainly consists of short-term hyperventilation and long-term compensation by increased oxygen uptake, transport, and use due to increased red blood cell mass, myoglobin, and mitochondria. If individuals cannot acclimatize to high Altitude, they may suffer from a high-Altitude Disease, such as acute mountain Disease (AMS), high-Altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE), high-Altitude cerebral edema (HACE) or chronic mountain sickness (CMS). Because some individuals are more susceptible to high Altitude Diseases than others, the incidence of these high-Altitude Diseases is variable and cannot be predicted. Studying “omes” using genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, transcriptomics, lipidomics, immunomics, glycomics and RNomics can help us understand the factors that mediate susceptibility to high Altitude illnesses. Moreover, analysis of the “omes” using a systems biology approach may provide a greater understanding of high-Altitude illness pathogenesis and improve the efficiency of the diagnosis and treatment of high-Altitude illnesses in the future. Below, we summarize the current literature regarding the role of “omes” in high-Altitude acclimatization/adaptation and Disease and discuss key research gaps to better understand the contribution of “omes” to high-Altitude illness susceptibility.

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  • ‘Ome’ on the range: update on high-Altitude acclimatization/adaptation and Disease
    Mol. BioSyst., 2014
    Co-Authors: Yongjun Luo, Yuxiao Wang, Yuqi Gao

    Abstract:

    The main physiological challenge in high-Altitude plateau environments is hypoxia. When people living in a plain environment migrate to the plateau, they face the threat of hypoxia. Most people can acclimatize to high Altitudes; the acclimatization process mainly consists of short-term hyperventilation and long-term compensation by increased oxygen uptake, transport, and use due to increased red blood cell mass, myoglobin, and mitochondria. If individuals cannot acclimatize to high Altitude, they may suffer from a high-Altitude Disease, such as acute mountain Disease (AMS), high-Altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE), high-Altitude cerebral edema (HACE) or chronic mountain sickness (CMS). Because some individuals are more susceptible to high Altitude Diseases than others, the incidence of these high-Altitude Diseases is variable and cannot be predicted. Studying “omes” using genomics, proteomics, metabolomics, transcriptomics, lipidomics, immunomics, glycomics and RNomics can help us understand the factors that mediate susceptibility to high Altitude illnesses. Moreover, analysis of the “omes” using a systems biology approach may provide a greater understanding of high-Altitude illness pathogenesis and improve the efficiency of the diagnosis and treatment of high-Altitude illnesses in the future. Below, we summarize the current literature regarding the role of “omes” in high-Altitude acclimatization/adaptation and Disease and discuss key research gaps to better understand the contribution of “omes” to high-Altitude illness susceptibility.

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  • Medical continuing education: reform of teaching methods about high Altitude Disease in China.
    High Altitude Medicine & Biology, 2013
    Co-Authors: Yongjun Luo, Qiquan Zhou, Jianjun Huang, Rong Luo, Xiaohong Yang, Yuqi Gao

    Abstract:

    Abstract Luo, Yonjun, Qiquan Zhou, Jianjun Huang, Rong Luo, Ziaohong Yang, and Yuqi Gao. Medical continuing education: Reform of teaching methods about high Altitude Disease in China. High Alt Med Biol 14:181–182, 2013.—The purpose of high Altitude continuing medical education is to adapt knowledge and skills for practical application on the plateau. Most trainees have experience with academic education and grassroots work experience on the plateau, so they want knowledge about new advances in the pathogenesis, diagnosis, and treatment of high Altitude Disease. As such, traditional classroom teaching methods are not useful to them. Training objects, content, and methods should attempt to conduct a variety of teaching practices. Through continuing medical education on high Altitude Disease, the authors seek to change the traditional teaching model away from a single classroom and traditional written examinations to expand trainees’ abilities. These innovative methods of training can improve both the qualit…

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Pla Tibet – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • On-Site Treatment of Large Crowds of Severe Acute Mountain Sickness with Acute Exposure to High Altitude Environment
    , 2010
    Co-Authors: Pla Tibet

    Abstract:

    Objectives:To explore the measurement of on-site first aid of severe acute Altitude illness in large crowds under acute exposure to high Altitude environment.Methods:18 patients who suffered from severe acute Altitude illness,including high Altitude pulmonary edema (17 cases) and cerebral edema (1 case),between 4 and 48 hours after arrival the Yushu earthquake area were treated at on-site,and the assessment of measurement and efficacy of treatment were conducted.Results:17 of 18 patients with severe acute Altitude illness were cured (17 vs 18,94.44%); 1 patient was transferred after improvement of patient’s condition,all patients survived. Conclusions: The general treatment associated with emergency treatment plays an important role on the severe acute high Altitude Disease caused by acute high Altitude hypoxia,and can elevate the cure rate of high Altitude Disease,lowering death,at on-site in large crowds of acute exposure to high Altitude environment.

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  • Effect of Step-Altitude Acclimatization on Prevention of Acute Severe Altitude Sickness in Construction of Qinghai-Tibet Railway
    Occupation and Health, 2010
    Co-Authors: Zheng Jian-bao, Pla Tibet

    Abstract:

    [Objective]To understand the effect of step-Altitude acclimatization on prevention of acute severe Altitude sickness (high Altitude pulmonary edema and high Altitude cerebral edema).[Methods]From mid-March to mid-October 2003,the incidence of acute severe high Altitude Disease among 22,200 workers in the construction of Qinghai-Tibet Railway of Tibet section (Tanggula pass to Lhasa of Tibet) were investigated. The incidence of people with different forms into plateau was compared,The incidence of people with ladder mode into the plateau was analyzed.[Results]During 7 months in 2003,a total of 22 200 workers accessed to Tibet section of Qinghai-Tibet Railway;184 cases of high Altitude pulmonary edema occurred (180male cases,4 female cases,aged 20~45 years),and 155 cases of high Altitude cerebral edema (all male cases,aged 22~44 years). The incidence was 0.83% and 0.70%,respectively. Compared workers with step-Altitude acclimatization with workers without acclimatization located in the same Altitude,the incidence of the former was significantly lower than the latter.[Conclusion]The incidence of acute severe Altitude sickness increases with the higher elevation. When large scale people entering plateau areas from plain,using the step-Altitude acclimatization can effectively reduce the incidence of acute severe high Altitude Disease;and as for radical access to plateau by large crowds,the establishment of acclimatization station at an Altitude of 2,500 meters,may be a better approach.

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