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Zakaria A. Mohamed – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Alum and Lime-Alum Removal of Toxic and Nontoxic Phytoplankton from the Nile River Water: Laboratory Study
    Water Resources Management, 2001
    Co-Authors: Zakaria A. Mohamed

    Abstract:

    No phytoplankton should be present in treated drinking water because of its potential for bad odor and toxins that may pose hazards to animals and humans upon consumption. This study describes the efficiency of Alum and lime-Alum treatments for removing phytoplankton from the Nile river water used as a source of drinking water in Egypt. The results showed that Alum could not precipitate all phosphate nor coagulate bloom forming cyanobacteria present in the water sample. On the other hand, lime-Alum treatment precipitated much more phosphate than Alum, and coagulated all phytoplankton present in the water samples including those that could not be coagulated by Alum. Furthermore, lime-Alum treatment did not change the pH of the water during all the experiment period. Hence, it is suggested that lime-Alum be used instead of Alum during water treatment processes in Egypt.

  • Alum and Lime-Alum Removal of Toxic and Nontoxic Phytoplankton from the Nile River Water: Laboratory Study
    Water Resources Management, 2001
    Co-Authors: Zakaria A. Mohamed

    Abstract:

    No phytoplankton should be present in treated drinking water because of its potential for bad odor and toxins that may pose hazards to animals and humans upon consumption. This study describes the efficiency of Alum and lime-Alum treatments for removing phytoplankton from the Nile river water used as a source of drinking water in Egypt. The results showed that Alum could not precipitate all phosphate nor coagulate bloom forming cyanobacteria present in the water sample. On the other hand, lime-Alum treatment precipitated much more phosphate than Alum, and coagulated all phytoplankton present in the water samples including those that could not be coagulated by Alum. Furthermore, lime-Alum treatment did not change the pH of the water during all the experiment period. Hence, it is suggested that lime-Alum be used instead of Alum during water treatment processes in Egypt. Copyright Kluwer Academic Publishers 2001

  • Efficiency of Alum and Lime-Alum treatments for removing toxic and non toxic phytoplankton from the Nile River water: Laboratory study –
    Egyptian Journal of Phycology, 2000
    Co-Authors: Zakaria A. Mohamed

    Abstract:

    No phytoplankton should be present in treated drinking water because of their production for bad smell and toxins that may pose hazards to animals and human upon consuming this water. This study describes the efficiency of Alum and lime-Alum treatments for removing phytoplankton from the Nile river water used as a source of drinking water in Egypt. The results showed that Alum could not precipitate all phosphate nor coagulate waterblooms-forming cyanobacteria present in the water sample. Conversely, lime-Alum treatment precipitated much more phosphate than Alum did, and coagulated all phytoplankton present in the water samples including those could not be coagulated by Alum. Furthermore, lime-Alum treatment did not change the pH of the water during all the experiment period. Hence, it is advisable that lime-Alum be used instead of Alum during water treatment process in Egypt.

Yutong Li – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • electrolytic coloration below 100 c and spectral properties of potassium Alum crystals
    Spectrochimica Acta Part A: Molecular and Biomolecular Spectroscopy, 2015
    Co-Authors: Hongen Gu, Yutong Li

    Abstract:

    Abstract Potassium Alum crystals are colored electrolytically below 100 °C and under various voltages using a pointed cathode and a flat anode. SO 3 − , SO 2 − , O 3 − , O 2 − , O − hole-trapped centers and O 0 , O 2− , H + radicals are produced in colored potassium Alum crystals. No obvious characteristic absorption band in ultraviolet and visible wavelength regions is observed in absorption spectrum of uncolored potassium Alum crystal. Characteristic absorption bands of SO 3 − , SO 2 − and O 3 − hole-trapped centers are observed in the absorption spectra of the colored potassium Alum crystals. The hole-trapped centers and radicals come from electric- and thermal-induced decomposition of SO 4 2− radicals and crystalline water molecules. Current–time curve for electrolytic coloration of potassium Alum crystal is given. Electron exchanges from electrons and small charged radicals to electrodes induce complete current.

  • Electrolytic coloration below 100°C and spectral properties of potassium Alum crystals.
    Spectrochimica Acta Part A: Molecular and Biomolecular Spectroscopy, 2014
    Co-Authors: Hongen Gu, Yutong Li

    Abstract:

    Abstract Potassium Alum crystals are colored electrolytically below 100 °C and under various voltages using a pointed cathode and a flat anode. SO 3 − , SO 2 − , O 3 − , O 2 − , O − hole-trapped centers and O 0 , O 2− , H + radicals are produced in colored potassium Alum crystals. No obvious characteristic absorption band in ultraviolet and visible wavelength regions is observed in absorption spectrum of uncolored potassium Alum crystal. Characteristic absorption bands of SO 3 − , SO 2 − and O 3 − hole-trapped centers are observed in the absorption spectra of the colored potassium Alum crystals. The hole-trapped centers and radicals come from electric- and thermal-induced decomposition of SO 4 2− radicals and crystalline water molecules. Current–time curve for electrolytic coloration of potassium Alum crystal is given. Electron exchanges from electrons and small charged radicals to electrodes induce complete current.

Hongen Gu – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • electrolytic coloration below 100 c and spectral properties of potassium Alum crystals
    Spectrochimica Acta Part A: Molecular and Biomolecular Spectroscopy, 2015
    Co-Authors: Hongen Gu, Yutong Li

    Abstract:

    Abstract Potassium Alum crystals are colored electrolytically below 100 °C and under various voltages using a pointed cathode and a flat anode. SO 3 − , SO 2 − , O 3 − , O 2 − , O − hole-trapped centers and O 0 , O 2− , H + radicals are produced in colored potassium Alum crystals. No obvious characteristic absorption band in ultraviolet and visible wavelength regions is observed in absorption spectrum of uncolored potassium Alum crystal. Characteristic absorption bands of SO 3 − , SO 2 − and O 3 − hole-trapped centers are observed in the absorption spectra of the colored potassium Alum crystals. The hole-trapped centers and radicals come from electric- and thermal-induced decomposition of SO 4 2− radicals and crystalline water molecules. Current–time curve for electrolytic coloration of potassium Alum crystal is given. Electron exchanges from electrons and small charged radicals to electrodes induce complete current.

  • Electrolytic coloration below 100°C and spectral properties of potassium Alum crystals.
    Spectrochimica Acta Part A: Molecular and Biomolecular Spectroscopy, 2014
    Co-Authors: Hongen Gu, Yutong Li

    Abstract:

    Abstract Potassium Alum crystals are colored electrolytically below 100 °C and under various voltages using a pointed cathode and a flat anode. SO 3 − , SO 2 − , O 3 − , O 2 − , O − hole-trapped centers and O 0 , O 2− , H + radicals are produced in colored potassium Alum crystals. No obvious characteristic absorption band in ultraviolet and visible wavelength regions is observed in absorption spectrum of uncolored potassium Alum crystal. Characteristic absorption bands of SO 3 − , SO 2 − and O 3 − hole-trapped centers are observed in the absorption spectra of the colored potassium Alum crystals. The hole-trapped centers and radicals come from electric- and thermal-induced decomposition of SO 4 2− radicals and crystalline water molecules. Current–time curve for electrolytic coloration of potassium Alum crystal is given. Electron exchanges from electrons and small charged radicals to electrodes induce complete current.