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Aluminium Oxides

The Experts below are selected from a list of 165 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Annick Hubin – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • dynamic in situ study of self assembling organic phosphonic acid monolayers from ethanolic solutions on Aluminium Oxides by means of odd random phase multisine electrochemical impedance spectroscopy
    Electrochimica Acta, 2013
    Co-Authors: Tom Hauffman, Tom Breugelmans, Yves Van Ingelgem, Els Tourwe, H Terryn, Annick Hubin

    Abstract:

    Abstract The study of self-assembling monolayers on various oxide substrates is a scientific field still in full development. One of the challenges in this type of work is to probe the interactions in situ and dynamically. In this study a novel approach to investigate the adsorption of n-octylphosphonic acid on Aluminium oxide from an ethanolic solution through odd random phase electrochemical impedance spectroscopy is presented. A model is proposed to describe the system and its validity is statistically established. It is observed that molecules adsorb on the surface. It is proven that the acid–base condensation reaction expels water which stays nearby the hydrophilic surface. Furthermore, it is shown that the phosphonic molecules bind ionically with the oxide surface. The work in this manuscript clearly shows that ethanol as a solvent is not suited to form stable organic acid layers on the surface. Due to the fact that water diffuses slowly in the bulk solvent, hazardous local environments are created at the oxide surface. During adsorption, the oxide is at the same time attacked. In this work, it is shown that odd random phase multisine electrochemical impedance spectroscopy is the ideal technique to not only investigate in situ dynamically the adsorbing behaviour of very thin films, but also to comprehend what happens with the buried substrate. Moreover, complex models can be used to fit the datasets obtained as it is possible with this analysis technique to prove statistically that they are correct.

  • measuring the adsorption of ethanol on Aluminium Oxides using odd random phase multisine electrochemical impedance spectroscopy
    Electrochemistry Communications, 2012
    Co-Authors: Tom Hauffman, Tom Breugelmans, Yves Van Ingelgem, Els Tourwe, H Terryn, Annick Hubin

    Abstract:

    Abstract The adsorption of self-assembling organic monolayers (SAM) on Oxides frequently involves the use of an organic solvent. However, the influence of this solvent on the oxide chemistry is never taken into account in SAM adsorption studies. Nevertheless, it is necessary to investigate its dynamics, as they might exhibit a competitional behaviour with respect to the later adsorption of organic SAM’s. In this study, the adsorption of the ethanol solvent on Aluminium Oxides is monitored. Due to the dynamic behaviour of the investigated system, odd random phase multisine electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has been employed (ORP EIS). A model was developed and statistically proven to be correct. The adsorption of ethanol molecules to form ethOxides on the surface was shown. Because of this reaction, hydroxyl groups of the oxide are being consumed, leading to changes in the oxide layer capacitance. This approach enables us to perform well founded studies of the adsorption of organic SAM’s on Oxides, as the influence of the solvent on the bare material is fully explored and known.

Tom Hauffman – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • dynamic in situ study of self assembling organic phosphonic acid monolayers from ethanolic solutions on Aluminium Oxides by means of odd random phase multisine electrochemical impedance spectroscopy
    Electrochimica Acta, 2013
    Co-Authors: Tom Hauffman, Tom Breugelmans, Yves Van Ingelgem, Els Tourwe, H Terryn, Annick Hubin

    Abstract:

    Abstract The study of self-assembling monolayers on various oxide substrates is a scientific field still in full development. One of the challenges in this type of work is to probe the interactions in situ and dynamically. In this study a novel approach to investigate the adsorption of n-octylphosphonic acid on Aluminium oxide from an ethanolic solution through odd random phase electrochemical impedance spectroscopy is presented. A model is proposed to describe the system and its validity is statistically established. It is observed that molecules adsorb on the surface. It is proven that the acid–base condensation reaction expels water which stays nearby the hydrophilic surface. Furthermore, it is shown that the phosphonic molecules bind ionically with the oxide surface. The work in this manuscript clearly shows that ethanol as a solvent is not suited to form stable organic acid layers on the surface. Due to the fact that water diffuses slowly in the bulk solvent, hazardous local environments are created at the oxide surface. During adsorption, the oxide is at the same time attacked. In this work, it is shown that odd random phase multisine electrochemical impedance spectroscopy is the ideal technique to not only investigate in situ dynamically the adsorbing behaviour of very thin films, but also to comprehend what happens with the buried substrate. Moreover, complex models can be used to fit the datasets obtained as it is possible with this analysis technique to prove statistically that they are correct.

  • measuring the adsorption of ethanol on Aluminium Oxides using odd random phase multisine electrochemical impedance spectroscopy
    Electrochemistry Communications, 2012
    Co-Authors: Tom Hauffman, Tom Breugelmans, Yves Van Ingelgem, Els Tourwe, H Terryn, Annick Hubin

    Abstract:

    Abstract The adsorption of self-assembling organic monolayers (SAM) on Oxides frequently involves the use of an organic solvent. However, the influence of this solvent on the oxide chemistry is never taken into account in SAM adsorption studies. Nevertheless, it is necessary to investigate its dynamics, as they might exhibit a competitional behaviour with respect to the later adsorption of organic SAM’s. In this study, the adsorption of the ethanol solvent on Aluminium Oxides is monitored. Due to the dynamic behaviour of the investigated system, odd random phase multisine electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has been employed (ORP EIS). A model was developed and statistically proven to be correct. The adsorption of ethanol molecules to form ethOxides on the surface was shown. Because of this reaction, hydroxyl groups of the oxide are being consumed, leading to changes in the oxide layer capacitance. This approach enables us to perform well founded studies of the adsorption of organic SAM’s on Oxides, as the influence of the solvent on the bare material is fully explored and known.

H Terryn – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • dynamic in situ study of self assembling organic phosphonic acid monolayers from ethanolic solutions on Aluminium Oxides by means of odd random phase multisine electrochemical impedance spectroscopy
    Electrochimica Acta, 2013
    Co-Authors: Tom Hauffman, Tom Breugelmans, Yves Van Ingelgem, Els Tourwe, H Terryn, Annick Hubin

    Abstract:

    Abstract The study of self-assembling monolayers on various oxide substrates is a scientific field still in full development. One of the challenges in this type of work is to probe the interactions in situ and dynamically. In this study a novel approach to investigate the adsorption of n-octylphosphonic acid on Aluminium oxide from an ethanolic solution through odd random phase electrochemical impedance spectroscopy is presented. A model is proposed to describe the system and its validity is statistically established. It is observed that molecules adsorb on the surface. It is proven that the acid–base condensation reaction expels water which stays nearby the hydrophilic surface. Furthermore, it is shown that the phosphonic molecules bind ionically with the oxide surface. The work in this manuscript clearly shows that ethanol as a solvent is not suited to form stable organic acid layers on the surface. Due to the fact that water diffuses slowly in the bulk solvent, hazardous local environments are created at the oxide surface. During adsorption, the oxide is at the same time attacked. In this work, it is shown that odd random phase multisine electrochemical impedance spectroscopy is the ideal technique to not only investigate in situ dynamically the adsorbing behaviour of very thin films, but also to comprehend what happens with the buried substrate. Moreover, complex models can be used to fit the datasets obtained as it is possible with this analysis technique to prove statistically that they are correct.

  • measuring the adsorption of ethanol on Aluminium Oxides using odd random phase multisine electrochemical impedance spectroscopy
    Electrochemistry Communications, 2012
    Co-Authors: Tom Hauffman, Tom Breugelmans, Yves Van Ingelgem, Els Tourwe, H Terryn, Annick Hubin

    Abstract:

    Abstract The adsorption of self-assembling organic monolayers (SAM) on Oxides frequently involves the use of an organic solvent. However, the influence of this solvent on the oxide chemistry is never taken into account in SAM adsorption studies. Nevertheless, it is necessary to investigate its dynamics, as they might exhibit a competitional behaviour with respect to the later adsorption of organic SAM’s. In this study, the adsorption of the ethanol solvent on Aluminium Oxides is monitored. Due to the dynamic behaviour of the investigated system, odd random phase multisine electrochemical impedance spectroscopy has been employed (ORP EIS). A model was developed and statistically proven to be correct. The adsorption of ethanol molecules to form ethOxides on the surface was shown. Because of this reaction, hydroxyl groups of the oxide are being consumed, leading to changes in the oxide layer capacitance. This approach enables us to perform well founded studies of the adsorption of organic SAM’s on Oxides, as the influence of the solvent on the bare material is fully explored and known.