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Patrick M. Smith – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Shelly fauna from the Cambrian (Miaolingian, Guzhangian) Shannon Formation and the SPICE event in the Amadeus Basin, Northern Territory
    Alcheringa: An Australasian Journal of Palaeontology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Patrick M. Smith, Glenn A. Brock, John R. Paterson
    Abstract:

    Smith, P.M., Brock, G.A. & Paterson J.R. 20 September 2019. Shelly fauna from the Cambrian (Miaolingian, Guzhangian) Shannon Formation and the SPICE event in the Amadeus Basin, Northern Territory. …

  • Trilobites and agnostids from the Goyder Formation (Cambrian Series 3, Guzhangian; Mindyallan), Amadeus Basin, central Australia.
    Zootaxa, 2018
    Co-Authors: Patrick M. Smith, John R. Paterson, Glenn A. Brock
    Abstract:

    A new assemblage containing twenty-two species of trilobites and agnostids is described from the Goyder Formation (Cambrian Series 3) in the Ross River Syncline and Gardiner Ranges of the Amadeus Basin, Northern Territory, central Australia. New trilobite taxa described include the genus, Trephina gen. nov., and four new species Adelogonus prichardi sp. nov., Hebeia stewarti sp. nov., Liostracina joyceae sp. nov., and Trephina ranfordi sp. nov. Two agnostid taxa previously known only from Antarctica, Ammagnostus antarcticus Bentley, Jago Cooper, 2009 and Hadragnostus helixensis Jago Cooper, 2005, are also documented. Of the two agnostid species, the latter is the most age diagnostic, previously reported from the Cambrian Series 3 (Guzhangian; late Mindyallan; Glyptagnostus stolidotus Zone) Spurs Formation in Northern Victoria Land. This age for the Goyder Formation assemblage is supported by the co-occurrence of the trilobites Biaverta reineri Opik, 1967, Blackwelderia repanda Opik, 1967, Henadoparia integra Opik, 1967, Monkaspis cf. travesi (Opik, 1967), Nomadinis pristinus Opik, 1967, Paraacidaspis? priscilla (Opik, 1967), and Polycyrtaspis cf. flexuosa Opik, 1967, also known from the late Mindyallan (G. stolidotus Zone) successions of the neighbouring Georgina Basin (Northern Territory and Queensland). The generic assemblage of the Goyder Formation is also similar to those from the Guzhangian (Mindyallan) of other parts of Australia (New South Wales, South Australia, and Western Australia), in addition to East Antarctica and North and South China.

  • A Basin-wide record of the Late Cambrian Steptoean positive carbon isotope excursion (SPICE) in the Amadeus Basin, Australia
    Palaeogeography Palaeoclimatology Palaeoecology, 2018
    Co-Authors: Susanne Schmid, Patrick M. Smith, Martijn Woltering
    Abstract:

    Abstract The Cambrian Paibian sedimentary succession of the central Australian Amadeus Basin contains a sequence of supratidal to subtidal shallow marine siliciclastic and oolitic, stromatolitic limestones and dolostones. Basin-wide sequence stratigraphy in combination with biostratigraphy revealed the G. stolidotus Zone within a 3rd-order transgressive systems tract (TST). The westward transgression caused changes from a fluvial-dominated depositional environment towards a shallow-marine oolitic carbonate shoal environment. The eastern succession is dominated by stromatolitic, oolitic carbonate rocks with 2- to 5-m 5th-order shoaling upward cycles with several 4th-order cycles. The change from TST to HST (highstand systems tract) is marked by a maximum flooding surface within the Goyder Formation, which coincides with the peak of the Steptoean Positive Carbon Isotope Excursion (SPICE). The SPICE shows a facies-independent, synchronous positive δ13C excursion of 5‰ in a 130 m interval in 8 sections across a ~460 km transect. The SPICE peak is lowest in the nearshore successions (+0.4‰ δ13C), and highest in the platform succession (+4.9‰ δ13C) and is interpreted to be related to the chemical gradient of seawater and mixing of the DIC with atmospheric CO2-derived (i.e. terrestrial) bicarbonate. The recovery from SPICE is recorded by 4th-order shoaling upward cycles that compose the 3rd-order HST. This is the first time that sequence stratigraphy and biostratigraphy has been combined with carbon isotope chemostratigraphy across the nearshore to subtidal Cambrian Basin succession in Australia.

Glenn A. Brock – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Shelly fauna from the Cambrian (Miaolingian, Guzhangian) Shannon Formation and the SPICE event in the Amadeus Basin, Northern Territory
    Alcheringa: An Australasian Journal of Palaeontology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Patrick M. Smith, Glenn A. Brock, John R. Paterson
    Abstract:

    Smith, P.M., Brock, G.A. & Paterson J.R. 20 September 2019. Shelly fauna from the Cambrian (Miaolingian, Guzhangian) Shannon Formation and the SPICE event in the Amadeus Basin, Northern Territory. …

  • Trilobites and agnostids from the Goyder Formation (Cambrian Series 3, Guzhangian; Mindyallan), Amadeus Basin, central Australia.
    Zootaxa, 2018
    Co-Authors: Patrick M. Smith, John R. Paterson, Glenn A. Brock
    Abstract:

    A new assemblage containing twenty-two species of trilobites and agnostids is described from the Goyder Formation (Cambrian Series 3) in the Ross River Syncline and Gardiner Ranges of the Amadeus Basin, Northern Territory, central Australia. New trilobite taxa described include the genus, Trephina gen. nov., and four new species Adelogonus prichardi sp. nov., Hebeia stewarti sp. nov., Liostracina joyceae sp. nov., and Trephina ranfordi sp. nov. Two agnostid taxa previously known only from Antarctica, Ammagnostus antarcticus Bentley, Jago Cooper, 2009 and Hadragnostus helixensis Jago Cooper, 2005, are also documented. Of the two agnostid species, the latter is the most age diagnostic, previously reported from the Cambrian Series 3 (Guzhangian; late Mindyallan; Glyptagnostus stolidotus Zone) Spurs Formation in Northern Victoria Land. This age for the Goyder Formation assemblage is supported by the co-occurrence of the trilobites Biaverta reineri Opik, 1967, Blackwelderia repanda Opik, 1967, Henadoparia integra Opik, 1967, Monkaspis cf. travesi (Opik, 1967), Nomadinis pristinus Opik, 1967, Paraacidaspis? priscilla (Opik, 1967), and Polycyrtaspis cf. flexuosa Opik, 1967, also known from the late Mindyallan (G. stolidotus Zone) successions of the neighbouring Georgina Basin (Northern Territory and Queensland). The generic assemblage of the Goyder Formation is also similar to those from the Guzhangian (Mindyallan) of other parts of Australia (New South Wales, South Australia, and Western Australia), in addition to East Antarctica and North and South China.

  • A Darriwilian (Middle Ordovician) bivalve-dominated molluscan fauna from the Stairway Sandstone, Amadeus Basin, central Australia.
    Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, 2016
    Co-Authors: Kristian G. Jakobsen, Glenn A. Brock, Arne Thorshøj Nielsen, David A. T. Harper
    Abstract:

    A bivalve-dominated molluscan fauna is described from the Darriwilian (Middle OrdoOrdovician) Stairway Sandstone, Amadeus Basin, central Australia. The fauna comprises 16 species of bivalves and rostroconchs plus six gastropod species which are treated under open nomenclature. Two new bivalves, Sthenodonta paenesymmetrica sp. nov. and Modiolopsis pojetai sp. nov., are described. The relatively low-diverse molluscan fauna constitutes around 62% of the total benthic macrofauna. Approximately 75% of the molluscs comprise bivalves, especially nuculoids, which were biogeographically restricted to low latitudes during the Ordovician. The molluscan assemblage displays a very high degree of endemism at species level, though the bivalve Sthenodonta eastii also occurs in the Georgina Basin farther to the northeast. This indicates a possible marine connective seaway between the Georgina and Amadeus Basins during the Darriwilian. Nuculites, Cyrtodonta, and Modiolopsis are cosmopolitan and previously reported from North China, Avalonia, and Southern Gondwana.

Malcolm R. Walter – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Stratigraphic relationships of Cryogenian strata disconformably overlying the Bitter Springs Formation, northeastern Amadeus Basin, Central Australia
    Precambrian Research, 2008
    Co-Authors: Steven J. Skotnicki, Malcolm R. Walter, Andrew C. Hill, Richard J. F. Jenkins
    Abstract:

    Abstract Detailed mapping and C and O stable isotopic data from sedimentary carbonate in units both above and below the paleo-erosion surface on the Bitter Springs Formation (BSF) in the northeastern Amadeus Basin, Australia, have clarified the stratigraphy of the area. Isotopic data indicate that the top of the Loves Creek Member of the Bitter Springs Formation is preserved near Corroboree Rock, and is overlain by fenestrate-carbonate-clast breccia, and dolomitic quartz sandstone and chert-pebble conglomerate of the Pioneer Sandstone. The isotopic data, as well as lithologic data, indicate the presence of a 1–2 m-thick cap carbonate preserved between Corroboree Rock and areas 10 km to the northeast. In many places the cap carbonate layer is mostly a syn-sedimentary dolomite-clast breccia, consistent with deposition and disturbance in shallow water. C and O isotopic data also indicate that thin-bedded sandstone and dolomite above the Bitter Springs Formation at Ellery Creek, and a newly discovered massive chert-bearing dolomite at Ross River could both belong to the glaciogenic Olympic Formation. Detailed mapping also provides a more detailed context for the famous black chert microfossil locality in the Bitter Springs Formation at Ross River.

  • No heliotropism in Neoproterozoic columnar stromatolite growth, Amadeus Basin, central Australia: Geophysical implications
    Palaeogeography Palaeoclimatology Palaeoecology, 2007
    Co-Authors: George E. Williams, Richard J. F. Jenkins, Malcolm R. Walter
    Abstract:

    An apparent sine wave pattern of columns in a single specimen of the stromatolite Anabaria juvensis (subsequently identified as Kotuikania) from a Neoproterozoic dolomite unit, originally assigned to the ∼850 Ma Bitter Springs Formation, in the Amadeus Basin, central Australia, was interpreted previously as recording heliotropic growth, that is, the non-vertical growth of columns throughout the year controlled by averaged incident solar radiation [Vanyo, J.P., Awramik, S.M., 1985. Stromatolites and Earth– Sun–Moon dynamics. Precambrian Research 29, 121–142]. The model of heliotropic growth was used to estimate obliquity of the ecliptic (Earth’s axial tilt) and days/year at 850 Ma. Subsequent work, however, casts strong doubt on the heliotropic interpretation. Further field observations and the study of 11 additional specimens of Anabaria=Kotuikania juvensis from the original locality confirm that the columns typically display strong branching, which produces a common divergence and convergence of columns that is incompatible with heliotropic growth. The rare, apparent sinuosity of columns is seen as the fortuitous product of column irregularity and column branching. Moreover, stratigraphic studies indicate that the host dolomite unit does not belong to the Bitter Springs Formation but caps the younger Cryogenian glaciogenic succession in the Amadeus Basin and hence is ∼600 Ma. The previous estimate of ∼435 (range 409–485) days/year based on extrapolated counts of laminae in the original specspecimen of A.=K. juvensis conflicts with the figure of 400±7 days/year indicated by high-quality palaeotidal data obtained from the late Cryogenian (∼640–600 Ma) Elatina–Reynella tidal rhythmites in South Australia. We conclude that inferences concerning Neoproterozoic obliquity and palaeorotation cannot be drawn from the non-vertical growth patterns of the columnar stromatolite A.=K. juvensis. © 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  • The nature of the Proterozoic-Cambrian transition in the northern Amadeus Basin, central Australia
    Precambrian Research, 1997
    Co-Authors: Duncan Mcilroy, Richard J. F. Jenkins, Malcolm R. Walter
    Abstract:

    Abstract The nature and completeness of the rock record is vital in determining whether evolution across the Proterozoic-Cambrian boundary was episodic or explosive. This study documents the nature of the Neoproterozoic-Cambrian transition within the Arumbera Sandstone of the northern Amadeus Basin, central Australia and demonstrates an erosional surface close to this major stratigraphic boundary. We are not able to recognise major facies differences between the largely unfossiliferous lower units I and II and the rich trace fossil bearing beds of units III–IV. Horizons above and below the purported Neoproterozoic-Cambrian transition were traced laterally and searched for both trace and body fossils in an attempt to locate a local boundary between the Neoproterozoic and Cambrian. A single nonconformity bound sedimentary cycle above the major erosional surface dividing Arumbera II and III is recognised. The lowest sedimentary cycle of Arumbera III is devoid of trace fossils, but at correlative levels in the Ooraminna Sub-Basin, this horizon bears elements of the Ediacara fauna, reported for the first time herein. We, therefore, suggest that, contrary to previous studies, the Neoproterozoic-Cambrian transition is not coincident with the widespread seismic reflector but, in areas of more complete sedimentation, actually lies above it. This study also presents new stratigraphic, ichnological and palaeontological information from the Neoproterozoic-Cambrian transition in central Australia, identifies areas of potentially continuous sedimentation and provides a basis for correlation of the Arumbera Sandstone with other Neoproterozoic-Cambrian successions within Australia and beyond.

Susanne Schmid – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • A Basin-wide record of the Late Cambrian Steptoean positive carbon isotope excursion (SPICE) in the Amadeus Basin, Australia
    Palaeogeography Palaeoclimatology Palaeoecology, 2018
    Co-Authors: Susanne Schmid, Patrick M. Smith, Martijn Woltering
    Abstract:

    Abstract The Cambrian Paibian sedimentary succession of the central Australian Amadeus Basin contains a sequence of supratidal to subtidal shallow marine siliciclastic and oolitic, stromatolitic limestones and dolostones. Basin-wide sequence stratigraphy in combination with biostratigraphy revealed the G. stolidotus Zone within a 3rd-order transgressive systems tract (TST). The westward transgression caused changes from a fluvial-dominated depositional environment towards a shallow-marine oolitic carbonate shoal environment. The eastern succession is dominated by stromatolitic, oolitic carbonate rocks with 2- to 5-m 5th-order shoaling upward cycles with several 4th-order cycles. The change from TST to HST (highstand systems tract) is marked by a maximum flooding surface within the Goyder Formation, which coincides with the peak of the Steptoean Positive Carbon Isotope Excursion (SPICE). The SPICE shows a facies-independent, synchronous positive δ13C excursion of 5‰ in a 130 m interval in 8 sections across a ~460 km transect. The SPICE peak is lowest in the nearshore successions (+0.4‰ δ13C), and highest in the platform succession (+4.9‰ δ13C) and is interpreted to be related to the chemical gradient of seawater and mixing of the DIC with atmospheric CO2-derived (i.e. terrestrial) bicarbonate. The recovery from SPICE is recorded by 4th-order shoaling upward cycles that compose the 3rd-order HST. This is the first time that sequence stratigraphy and biostratigraphy has been combined with carbon isotope chemostratigraphy across the nearshore to subtidal Cambrian Basin succession in Australia.

  • Using stratiform magnetic anomalies to map near-surface architecture: insights from the Amadeus Basin
    Australian Journal of Earth Sciences, 2017
    Co-Authors: James Austin, Susanne Schmid, Clive Foss
    Abstract:

    ABSTRACTThe Amadeus Basin displays subtle magnetic anomalies that trace strata for considerable distance, highlighting complex folding patterns. Magnetic modelling techniques can be utilised on these stratiform anomalies to extrapolate the near-surface structure of the Basin. However, because of the mathematical trade-off between the dip and magnetisation of bodies, the dips of the bodies cannot be known unless the magnetisation is also known. Normally it would be optimal to measure the magnetisation, but this is not always possible or feasible. In this study, we investigate the relationships between dip and magnetisation using an approach that would generally be considered a little backward, i.e. constraining magnetisation direction using geological data. Three study areas were chosen to investigate a number of stratigraphic horizons, the Waterhouse Range, Glen Helen and Ross River areas. Modelling results suggest that some layers primarily retain induced magnetisation, remanence is dominant in others, b…

  • neoproterozoic evaporites and their role in carbon isotope chemostratigraphy Amadeus Basin australia
    Precambrian Research, 2017
    Co-Authors: Susanne Schmid
    Abstract:

    Abstract The Tonian Bitter Springs Group (∼830–750 Ma), within the Amadeus Basin in central Australia consists of thick halite and sulphate evaporite accumulations. The deposition of halite occurred in shallow marine, lagoon (salina) environment (Gillen Formation), and developed into sulphate-dominated supratidal sabkha during sea level regression (Johnnys Creek Formation). The overall regression was interrupted by a transgressive phase lasting at least 20 Ma and leading to deposition of Basin-wide stromatolitic dolostone (Loves Creek Formation). The salinity and high evaporation is reflected in positive δ 13 C in carbonates (+4 to +6‰ VPDB) of the evaporitic units, while the shallow marine incursion of the Loves Creek Formation (−2‰ δ 13 C) show typical marine carbonate isotopic values. The Bitter Springs Group chemostratigraphy has been correlated globally and the negative excursion was named previously after this unit (Bitter Springs Stage anomaly). However, the mechanism of evaporation-driven fractionation of δ 13 C is different from the commonly proposed inorganic-organic carbon fractionation, and challenges the views on interpreting global chemostratigraphic anomalies or excursion and their cause. Evaporite Basins covered vast regions worldwide prior to the Sturtian glaciation, e.g. the Australian evaporites would have covered a third of the continent. The light surface of evaporites and associated carbonates would have had a high albedo and effectively cause less surface heat absorption. This subsequently would have triggered temperature decrease on a continental and possibly global scale. This paper hypothesises that the deposition of evaporites worldwide would have contributed to global cooling starting ∼100 Ma prior to Snowball Earth and would have played an important role in global glaciation.

John R. Paterson – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Shelly fauna from the Cambrian (Miaolingian, Guzhangian) Shannon Formation and the SPICE event in the Amadeus Basin, Northern Territory
    Alcheringa: An Australasian Journal of Palaeontology, 2019
    Co-Authors: Patrick M. Smith, Glenn A. Brock, John R. Paterson
    Abstract:

    Smith, P.M., Brock, G.A. & Paterson J.R. 20 September 2019. Shelly fauna from the Cambrian (Miaolingian, Guzhangian) Shannon Formation and the SPICE event in the Amadeus Basin, Northern Territory. …

  • Trilobites and agnostids from the Goyder Formation (Cambrian Series 3, Guzhangian; Mindyallan), Amadeus Basin, central Australia.
    Zootaxa, 2018
    Co-Authors: Patrick M. Smith, John R. Paterson, Glenn A. Brock
    Abstract:

    A new assemblage containing twenty-two species of trilobites and agnostids is described from the Goyder Formation (Cambrian Series 3) in the Ross River Syncline and Gardiner Ranges of the Amadeus Basin, Northern Territory, central Australia. New trilobite taxa described include the genus, Trephina gen. nov., and four new species Adelogonus prichardi sp. nov., Hebeia stewarti sp. nov., Liostracina joyceae sp. nov., and Trephina ranfordi sp. nov. Two agnostid taxa previously known only from Antarctica, Ammagnostus antarcticus Bentley, Jago Cooper, 2009 and Hadragnostus helixensis Jago Cooper, 2005, are also documented. Of the two agnostid species, the latter is the most age diagnostic, previously reported from the Cambrian Series 3 (Guzhangian; late Mindyallan; Glyptagnostus stolidotus Zone) Spurs Formation in Northern Victoria Land. This age for the Goyder Formation assemblage is supported by the co-occurrence of the trilobites Biaverta reineri Opik, 1967, Blackwelderia repanda Opik, 1967, Henadoparia integra Opik, 1967, Monkaspis cf. travesi (Opik, 1967), Nomadinis pristinus Opik, 1967, Paraacidaspis? priscilla (Opik, 1967), and Polycyrtaspis cf. flexuosa Opik, 1967, also known from the late Mindyallan (G. stolidotus Zone) successions of the neighbouring Georgina Basin (Northern Territory and Queensland). The generic assemblage of the Goyder Formation is also similar to those from the Guzhangian (Mindyallan) of other parts of Australia (New South Wales, South Australia, and Western Australia), in addition to East Antarctica and North and South China.

  • Trilobites from the Giles Creek Dolostone (Cambrian Series 3, Stage 5; Templetonian) Amadeus Basin, central Australia
    Papers in Palaeontology, 2015
    Co-Authors: Patrick M. Smith, John R. Paterson, Glenn A. Brock
    Abstract:

    Twelve trilobite species, plus rare agnostid arthropods, are described from the Giles Creek Dolostone (Cambrian Series 3, Stage 5; Templetonian) at Ross River Gorge and Gaylad Dam in the north-eastern Amadeus Basin, Northern Territory, central Australia. Amphoton krusei sp. nov., Nepea ommacrada sp. nov., Penarosa oepiki sp. nov. and Schopfaspis shergoldi sp. nov. are described in association with Deiradonyx toddi Opik, 1982, Dinesus sp., Kootenia sp., Pagetia silicunda Jell, 1975, Solenoparia sp., Tonkinella? sp., Xystridura filifera Opik, 1975a, and Xystridura gayladia Opik, 1975a, in addition to indeterminate agnostids. Pagetia silicunda and Xystridura filifera suggest an early Templetonian age, within the Pentagnostus anabarensis or Pentagnostus praecurrens Zone. This is supported by the co-occurrence of Amphoton Lorenz, 1906, Deiradonyx, Opik, 1982, Dinesus Etheridge, 1896 and Kootenia Walcott, 1889, all of which occur in Templetonian successions in the Georgina Basin (Northern Territory and Queensland), Gnalta Shelf (western New South Wales) and the Heathcote Greenstone Belt (Victoria). We argue that the Tempe Formation (central Amadeus Basin) and the Giles Creek Dolostone are not contemporaneous as previously suggested, indicating that regional stratigraphical schemes need to be amended.