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Amaranthus hypochondriacus

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June Simpson – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Cloning and characterization of a trypsin inhibitor cDNA from amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus) seeds.
    Plant Molecular Biology, 1999
    Co-Authors: Silvia Valdés-rodríguez, Alejandro Blanco-labra, Glenda Gutiérrez-benicio, Anatoli Boradenenko, Alfredo Herrera-estrella, June Simpson

    Abstract:

    We previously isolated and sequenced the major trypsin inhibitor from Amaranthus hypochondriacus seeds. This amaranth trypsin inhibitor (AmTI) is a 69 amino acid protein with high homology to members of the potato-1 inhibitor family. This paper describes the cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding this trypsin inhibitor in various vegetative tissues of the amaranth plant during seed development and imbibition, and investigates the possible induction of AmTI expression by wounding.

  • Cloning and characterization of a trypsin inhibitor cDNA from amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus) seeds
    Plant Molecular Biology, 1999
    Co-Authors: Silvia Valdés-rodríguez, Alejandro Blanco-labra, Glenda Gutiérrez-benicio, Anatoli Boradenenko, Alfredo Herrera-estrella, June Simpson

    Abstract:

    We previously isolated and sequenced the major trypsin inhibitor from Amaranthus hypochondriacus seeds. This amaranth trypsin inhibitor (AmTI) is a 69 amino acid protein with high homology to members of the potato-1 inhibitor family. This paper describes the cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding this trypsin inhibitor in various vegetative tissues of the amaranth plant during seed development and imbibition, and investigates the possible induction of AmTI expression by wounding. We obtained a 393 bp cDNA sequence with an open reading frame corresponding to a polypeptide with 76 amino acid residues. With the exception of one residue (Ser-41), the polypeptide agrees with the amino acid sequence previously reported, plus 7 more residues at the N-terminus. These N-terminal residues are thought to be part of the signal used for intracellular sorting. The organ specificity of AmTI gene expression was investigated by northern analysis, showing that mRNA corresponding to AmTI genes was present in stems of plants growing under normal conditions. The kinetics of accumulation of the AmTI-mRNA, protein, and inhibitory activity during seed development and imbibition was determined. AmTI-mRNA accumulation reached a maximum at 14 days after anthesis (daa) and then gradually decreased, being barely detectable 36 daa. The AmTI protein accumulation followed the same profile as the inhibitory activity, both were delayed with respect to the mRNA. The maximum level was observed 22 daa, and then gradually decreased until a steady state was reached as seed maturation proceeded. Upon imbibition, a gradual decrease in AmTI protein and inhibitory activity was shown; however, an AmTI transcript was detected 24 h after imbibition. In contrast to representative members of the potato I family, this inhibitor was not inducible by wounding of leaves.

  • Agrobacterium-mediated transformation of Amaranthus hypochondriacus: light- and tissue-specific expression of a pea chlorophyll a/b-binding protein promoter.
    Plant Cell Reports, 1997
    Co-Authors: A. E. Jofre-garfias, Nicolás Villegas-sepúlveda, José Luis Cabrera-ponce, Rosa M. Adame-Álvarez, Luis Herrera-estrella, June Simpson

    Abstract:

    Mature embryos of Amaranthus hypochondriacus (amaranth) were used to develop an in vitro culture system for plant regeneration and genetic transformation. Plants were regenerated from embryo-derived callus cultivated on Murashige and Skoog medium supplemented with 10 µM 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid or 3,6-dichloro-2-methoxybenzoic acid and 10% coconut liquid endosperm. Transgenic plants were obtained by inoculation of mature embryo explants with a disarmed Agrobacterium strain containing the plasmid pGV2260(pEsc4), which carried the genes encoding neomycin phosphotransferase type II and β-glucuronidase. The presence of transgenes in the genome of transformed amaranth plants and their progeny was demonstrated by Southern blot hybridization. Tissue specific and light-inducible expression directed by a pea chlorophyll a/b-binding protein promoter was observed in transgenic amaranth plants and their progeny.

María Cristina Añón – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • purificacion y caracterizacion de una lectina de Amaranthus hypochondriacus un compuesto antiproliferativo
    Innotec, 2016
    Co-Authors: Antonieta Mengoni, Alejandra Viviana Quiroga, María Cristina Añón

    Abstract:

    Los alimentos ejercen una influencia importante en el desarrollo de diversas enfermedades no transmisibles, entre las que podemos incluir el cancer. Por otra parte, existe informacion que da cuenta de que algunos alimentos o algun componente alimentario pueden proteger contra el desarrollo de esta enfermedad. El objetivo de este trabajo fue purificar, caracterizar y analizar la potencial actividad antiproliferativa de una lectina proveniente de Amaranthus hypochondriacus (AH). Para ello se purifico parcialmente la lectina a partir de harina desgrasada de AH (LPP). Se encontro una proteina con una masa molecular aproximada de 65-70 kDa, compuesta por dos subunidades de aproximadamente 35 kDa unidas por interacciones no covalentes, con actividad hemaglutinante caracteristica de las lectinas. Se estudio la inhibicion de la proliferacion celular utilizando la linea celular tumoral CaCo2/TC7 mediante el ensayo del cristal violeta. Ademas de la lectina parcialmente purificada, se estudio el efecto antiproliferativo de los aislados de Amaranhus hypochondriacusy mantegazzianus, y una lectina comercial de Amaranthus caudatus. Todas las muestras ensayadas mostraron efectos citotoxicos en forma de dosis respuesta.

  • Antithrombotic Effects of Amaranthus hypochondriacus Proteins in Rats
    Plant Foods for Human Nutrition, 2016
    Co-Authors: Ana Clara Sabbione, Gustavo Rinaldi, María Cristina Añón, Adriana A. Scilingo

    Abstract:

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is a major cause of disability and premature death throughout the world. Diets with antithrombotic components offer a convenient and effective way of preventing and reducing CVD incidence. The aim of the present work was to assess in vivo and ex vivo effects of Amaranthus hypochondriacus proteins on platelet plug formation and coagulation cascade. Amaranth proteins were orally administrated to rats (AG, 8 animals) and bleeding time was determined showing no significant difference compared with control rats (CG, 7 animals). However, results show a strong tendency, suggesting that amaranth proteins are involved in the inhibition of thrombus formation. Non-anticoagulated blood extracted from animals was analyzed with the hemostatometer, where AG parameters obtained were twice the values showed by CG. The clotting tests, thrombin time (TT) and activated partial thromboplastin time (APTT), presented a 17 and 14 % clotting formation increase respectively when comparing AG with CG. The ex-vivo assays confirm the hypothesis inferring that amaranth proteins are a potential antithrombotic agent.

Silvia Valdés-rodríguez – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Cloning and characterization of a trypsin inhibitor cDNA from amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus) seeds.
    Plant Molecular Biology, 1999
    Co-Authors: Silvia Valdés-rodríguez, Alejandro Blanco-labra, Glenda Gutiérrez-benicio, Anatoli Boradenenko, Alfredo Herrera-estrella, June Simpson

    Abstract:

    We previously isolated and sequenced the major trypsin inhibitor from Amaranthus hypochondriacus seeds. This amaranth trypsin inhibitor (AmTI) is a 69 amino acid protein with high homology to members of the potato-1 inhibitor family. This paper describes the cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding this trypsin inhibitor in various vegetative tissues of the amaranth plant during seed development and imbibition, and investigates the possible induction of AmTI expression by wounding.

  • Cloning and characterization of a trypsin inhibitor cDNA from amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus) seeds
    Plant Molecular Biology, 1999
    Co-Authors: Silvia Valdés-rodríguez, Alejandro Blanco-labra, Glenda Gutiérrez-benicio, Anatoli Boradenenko, Alfredo Herrera-estrella, June Simpson

    Abstract:

    We previously isolated and sequenced the major trypsin inhibitor from Amaranthus hypochondriacus seeds. This amaranth trypsin inhibitor (AmTI) is a 69 amino acid protein with high homology to members of the potato-1 inhibitor family. This paper describes the cloning and expression of a cDNA encoding this trypsin inhibitor in various vegetative tissues of the amaranth plant during seed development and imbibition, and investigates the possible induction of AmTI expression by wounding. We obtained a 393 bp cDNA sequence with an open reading frame corresponding to a polypeptide with 76 amino acid residues. With the exception of one residue (Ser-41), the polypeptide agrees with the amino acid sequence previously reported, plus 7 more residues at the N-terminus. These N-terminal residues are thought to be part of the signal used for intracellular sorting. The organ specificity of AmTI gene expression was investigated by northern analysis, showing that mRNA corresponding to AmTI genes was present in stems of plants growing under normal conditions. The kinetics of accumulation of the AmTI-mRNA, protein, and inhibitory activity during seed development and imbibition was determined. AmTI-mRNA accumulation reached a maximum at 14 days after anthesis (daa) and then gradually decreased, being barely detectable 36 daa. The AmTI protein accumulation followed the same profile as the inhibitory activity, both were delayed with respect to the mRNA. The maximum level was observed 22 daa, and then gradually decreased until a steady state was reached as seed maturation proceeded. Upon imbibition, a gradual decrease in AmTI protein and inhibitory activity was shown; however, an AmTI transcript was detected 24 h after imbibition. In contrast to representative members of the potato I family, this inhibitor was not inducible by wounding of leaves.

  • Purification, characterization, and complete amino acid sequence of a trypsin inhibitor from amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus) seeds.
    Plant Physiology, 1993
    Co-Authors: Silvia Valdés-rodríguez, M. Segura-nieto, A. Chagolla-lopez, Avy. Vargas-cortina, N. Martinez-gallardo, A. Blanco-labra

    Abstract:

    A protein proteinase inhibitor was purified from a seed extract of amaranth (Amaranthus hypochondriacus) by precipitation with (NH4)2SO4, gel-filtration chromatography, ion-exchange chromatography, and reverse-phase high-performance liquid chromatography. It is a 69-amino acid protein with a high content of valine, arginine, and glutamic acid, but lacking in methionine. The inhibitor has a relative molecular weight of 7400 and an isoelectric point of 7.5. It is a serine proteinase inhibitor that recognizes chymotrypsin, trypsin, and trypsin-like proteinase activities extracted from larvae of the insect Prostephanus truncatus. This inhibitor belongs to the potato-I inhibitor family, showing the closest homology (59.5%) with the Lycopersicum peruvianum trypsin inhibitor, and (51%) with the proteinase inhibitor 5 extracted from the seeds of Cucurbita maxima. The position of the lysineaspartic acid residues present in the active site of the amaranth inhibitor are found in almost the same relative position as in the inhibitor from C. maxima.