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Ambulatory Electrocardiographic Monitor

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Bhatnagar, Anna Sushila – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Evaluating the Process of Ambulatory Electrocardiographic Monitor Application and Completion Rates
    'Paleontological Institute at The University of Kansas', 2019
    Co-Authors: Bhatnagar, Anna Sushila

    Abstract:

    Abstract Outpatient Ambulatory Electrocardiographic Monitoring (AEM) is often used by practitioners to diagnose an arrhythmia. AEM devices can be mailed to the patient’s home or applied in the office setting. A common barrier that decreases the diagnostic utility is failure to successfully complete the Monitoring. Objective: The purpose of this study is to compare the AEM completion rates between patients who self-apply the Monitor at home and those who have the Monitor applied in the office by clinical staff. Methods: A cross-sectional retrospective chart review was used. The electronic health records were reviewed for billable codes before and after April 2018 when a new office policy of mailing Monitors to patients was implemented. A random sample of 50 patients was obtained from each timeframe. Results: The sample included the electronic medical records of adult patients (n=100) seen in the Cardiology clinic. Over half 63 (63%) were female, and the majority 88 (88%) were Caucasian, with 10 (10%) Black or African American, and 1 (1%) reporting Asian race. The average age was 59 (range 20-100). Most patients 98 (98%) had health insurance. The office application group had a significantly higher rate of successful completion 62 (62%) compared to the mail group 38 (38%). The average number of days that the AEM was worn was 18 days (range 7-30 days). Conclusion: The results of this study indicate that professional support and application of AEM in the clinic setting may lead to an increase in completion rates

John D. Horowitz – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The prevalence of ST-segment depression on Ambulatory Electrocardiographic Monitoring during daily life in high-risk asymptomatic police officers.
    Journal of cardiovascular risk, 1994
    Co-Authors: Margaret Arstall, Ronald D. Wuttke, Judith Arthur, Jeffrey A. Whitford, John D. Horowitz

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND In individuals with no known ischaemic heart disease, the prevalence and significance of ST-segment depression on Ambulatory Electrocardiographic Monitoring is unclear. We therefore determined the prevalence of ST-segment depression among middle-aged male police officers, an occupational group in whom an increased risk of ischaemic heart disease has been reported, who also had multiple individual coronary risk factors but no known ischaemic heart disease. METHODS Full-time male police offices aged 45 years or more with at least two coronary risk factors but no known ischaemic heart disease performed a 24h Ambulatory Electrocardiographic Monitor, timed to include a shift of work. The number and duration of episodes of ST-segment depression were determined. In those in whom ST-segment depression was detected, exercise thallium scintigraphy and repeat 24h Ambulatory Electrocardiographic Monitoring were performed. RESULTS The prevalence of ST-segment depression on 24h Ambulatory Electrocardiographic Monitoring, including an 8h period of normal work, was 3.4% (95% confidence interval 1.3-8.3%). Exercise thallium scintigraphy was carried out in those in whom ST-segment depression had been detected. Despite two participants developing ST-segment depression during exercise, no evidence of myocardial ischaemia was observed on the perfusion scan. Therefore, the prevalence of ST-segment depression on Ambulatory Electrocardiographic Monitoring in this asymptomatic but high-risk population was low and, when it did occur, no exercise-induced myocardial ischaemia was observed. CONCLUSION These results suggest that ST-segment depression on Ambulatory Electrocardiographic Monitoring in asymptomatic subjects may not represent myocardial ischaemia. The use of this parameter to screen asymptomatic populations for ischaemic heart disease is therefore highly questionable.

Margaret Arstall – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • The prevalence of ST-segment depression on Ambulatory Electrocardiographic Monitoring during daily life in high-risk asymptomatic police officers.
    Journal of cardiovascular risk, 1994
    Co-Authors: Margaret Arstall, Ronald D. Wuttke, Judith Arthur, Jeffrey A. Whitford, John D. Horowitz

    Abstract:

    BACKGROUND In individuals with no known ischaemic heart disease, the prevalence and significance of ST-segment depression on Ambulatory Electrocardiographic Monitoring is unclear. We therefore determined the prevalence of ST-segment depression among middle-aged male police officers, an occupational group in whom an increased risk of ischaemic heart disease has been reported, who also had multiple individual coronary risk factors but no known ischaemic heart disease. METHODS Full-time male police offices aged 45 years or more with at least two coronary risk factors but no known ischaemic heart disease performed a 24h Ambulatory Electrocardiographic Monitor, timed to include a shift of work. The number and duration of episodes of ST-segment depression were determined. In those in whom ST-segment depression was detected, exercise thallium scintigraphy and repeat 24h Ambulatory Electrocardiographic Monitoring were performed. RESULTS The prevalence of ST-segment depression on 24h Ambulatory Electrocardiographic Monitoring, including an 8h period of normal work, was 3.4% (95% confidence interval 1.3-8.3%). Exercise thallium scintigraphy was carried out in those in whom ST-segment depression had been detected. Despite two participants developing ST-segment depression during exercise, no evidence of myocardial ischaemia was observed on the perfusion scan. Therefore, the prevalence of ST-segment depression on Ambulatory Electrocardiographic Monitoring in this asymptomatic but high-risk population was low and, when it did occur, no exercise-induced myocardial ischaemia was observed. CONCLUSION These results suggest that ST-segment depression on Ambulatory Electrocardiographic Monitoring in asymptomatic subjects may not represent myocardial ischaemia. The use of this parameter to screen asymptomatic populations for ischaemic heart disease is therefore highly questionable.