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Amine Process

The Experts below are selected from a list of 198 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Stefano Brandani – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • co2 capture from syngas by an adsorption Process at a biomass gasification chp plant its comparison with Amine based co2 capture
    International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, 2015
    Co-Authors: Gabriel David Oreggioni, Stefano Brandani, Mauro Luberti, Yusuf Baykan, Daniel Friedrich

    Abstract:

    Abstract An exemplary 10 MW th biomass-fuelled CHP plant equipped with a FICFB (Fast Internally Circulating Fluidised Bed) gasifier and a Jenbacher type 6 gas engine was simulated using Honeywell UniSim R400 to estimate the power and thermal outputs. The biomass gasification CHP plant was integrated with either a pre-combustion adsorptive capture Process or a conventional post-combustion Amine Process to achieve carbon-negative power and heat generation. The practical maximum of carbon capture rate achievable with an adsorptive CO 2 capture Process applied to a syngas stream was 49% in overall while the Amine Process could boost the carbon capture rate up to 59%. However, it was found that the two-stage, two-bed PVSA (Pressure Vacuum Swing Adsorption) unit would have a clear advantage over the conventional Amine Processes in that the CHP plant integrated with the PVSA unit could achieve 1.7% points higher net electrical efficiency and 12.8% points higher net thermal efficiency than the CHP plant integrated with the Amine Process.

  • Techno-Economic Study of Adsorption Processes for Pre- Combustion Carbon Capture at a Biomass CHP Plant
    Energy Procedia, 2015
    Co-Authors: Gabriel David Oreggioni, Daniel Friedrich, Stefano Brandani

    Abstract:

    An exemplary 10 MWth biomass CHP plant with a FICFB (Fast Internally Circulating Fluidised Bed) gasifier and Jenbacher type 6 gas engine was simulated to estimate the power and thermal outputs. The biomass-fuelled CHP plant was modified for carbon capture using either adsorption or Amine Process. It was found that a two-stage, two-bed PVSA (Pressure Vacuum Swing Adsorption) unit applied to syngas stream for pre-combustion capture spent less specific energy per captured CO2 than a conventional Amine Process for post-combustion carbon capture. In particular, adsorptive carbon capture is very promising for this application since, in comparison to Amine Process, adsorption Process is economical for small-to-medium scale gas separations, the capital cost is relatively low and it does not require the evaporating, corrosive Amine solvents.

  • CO2capture from syngas by an adsorption Process at a biomass gasification CHP plant: Its comparison with Amine-based CO2capture
    International Journal of Greenhouse Gas Control, 2015
    Co-Authors: Gabriel David Oreggioni, Stefano Brandani, Mauro Luberti, Yusuf Baykan, Daniel Friedrich, Hyungwoong Ahn

    Abstract:

    An exemplary 10MWthbiomass-fuelled CHP plant equipped with a FICFB (Fast Internally Circulating Fluidised Bed) gasifier and a Jenbacher type 6 gas engine was simulated using Honeywell UniSim R400 to estimate the power and thermal outputs. The biomass gasification CHP plant was integrated with either a pre-combustion adsorptive capture Process or a conventional post-combustion Amine Process to achieve carbon-negative power and heat generation. The practical maximum of carbon capture rate achievable with an adsorptive CO2capture Process applied to a syngas stream was 49% in overall while the Amine Process could boost the carbon capture rate up to 59%. However, it was found that the two-stage, two-bed PVSA (Pressure Vacuum Swing Adsorption) unit would have a clear advantage over the conventional Amine Processes in that the CHP plant integrated with the PVSA unit could achieve 1.7% points higher net electrical efficiency and 12.8% points higher net thermal efficiency than the CHP plant integrated with the Amine Process.

Zhien Zhang – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • hybrid systems combining membrane and absorption technologies leads to more efficient acid gases co2 and h2s removal from natural gas
    Journal of CO 2 Utilization, 2017
    Co-Authors: Mashallah Rezakazemi, Zhien Zhang, Isa Heydari

    Abstract:

    Abstract The Amine separation technology is the utmost alternative Process to remove acid gases (H2S and CO2) from natural gas (NG). In this survey, the hybrid Process on NG treatment is studied. The hybrid Process combines membrane and Amine Processes to utilize their both advantages. Three different sweetening Processes are considered here: Amine solutions (30 wt.% diethanolAmine (DEA)), membrane Process (hollow fiber membrane (HFM) approach), and hybrid Process (Amine + membrane). Membrane Process was first used to remove acid gases from NG, and Amine Process was further used to complete purification to come across pipeline standards. Economic factors involved in the prediction of separation costs includes capital recovery cost, expenses concern to hydrocarbon losses, and operating expenses such as maintenance cost, labor cost, energy cost and replacement cost of membrane. For Amine Process, most separation cost depends on operating cost specifically energy cost and least separation cost is dependent to hydrocarbon losses, also for membrane Process most separation cost and least separation cost are dependent on hydrocarbon losses and capital recovery cost, respectively. The simulation was also implemented for NGL-1200 (GOGPC, Iran) plant to find whether the same modeling is responsible for an industrial unit.

  • Hybrid systems: Combining membrane and absorption technologies leads to more efficient acid gases (CO2and H2S) removal from natural gas
    Journal of CO2 Utilization, 2017
    Co-Authors: Mashallah Rezakazemi, Isa Heydari, Zhien Zhang

    Abstract:

    The Amine separation technology is the utmost alternative Process to remove acid gases (H2S and CO2) from natural gas (NG). In this survey, the hybrid Process on NG treatment is studied. The hybrid Process combines membrane and Amine Processes to utilize their both advantages. Three different sweetening Processes are considered here: Amine solutions (30 wt.% diethanolAmine (DEA)), membrane Process (hollow fiber membrane (HFM) approach), and hybrid Process (Amine + membrane). Membrane Process was first used to remove acid gases from NG, and Amine Process was further used to complete purification to come across pipeline standards. Economic factors involved in the prediction of separation costs includes capital recovery cost, expenses concern to hydrocarbon losses, and operating expenses such as maintenance cost, labor cost, energy cost and replacement cost of membrane. For Amine Process, most separation cost depends on operating cost specifically energy cost and least separation cost is dependent to hydrocarbon losses, also for membrane Process most separation cost and least separation cost are dependent on hydrocarbon losses and capital recovery cost, respectively. The simulation was also implemented for NGL-1200 (GOGPC, Iran) plant to find whether the same modeling is responsible for an industrial unit.

Craig Schubert – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Advanced Amine Process Technology Operations and Results from Demonstration Facility at EDF Le Havre
    Energy Procedia, 2014
    Co-Authors: Barath Baburao, Stephen Bedell, Paula Restrepo, Craig Schubert, Bruce Debolt, Islem Haji, David Daniel Schmidt, Francis Chopin

    Abstract:

    Abstract Alstom Power and The Dow Chemical Company have jointly developed an Advanced Amine Process (AAP) utilizing Dow’s advanced Amine solvent formulation UCARSOL™ FGC-3000 for the capture of CO2 from fossil fuel power plant-generated flue gas. This development effort includes the use of facilities to address operational issues such as energy efficiency and solvent management, along with environmental factors such as emissions and wastes. A new demonstration facility has been constructed in Le Havre, France, through a partnership between Alstom and Electricite de France (EDF) with support from ADEME, the French Environment and Energy Management Agency. This facility is designed to capture 25 tonnes of CO2/day at a 90% capture rate on a slip- stream flue gas from a hard coal-fired power plant. The EDF-Le Havre demonstration plant is equipped with flue gas conditioning for controlling the water content, temperature and SOx level of the incoming flue gas stream. The CO2 absorber column contains structured packing selected for optimal CO2 capture efficiency and fluid flow characteristics. The exiting flue gas passes through a water wash section designed to capture residual Amine emissions. Amine solvent management comprises an Amine reclamation system and assisted by an on-site Amine solvent analytical laboratory. The quality of the incoming flue gas, the exiting flue gas and CO2 product gas streams are assessed through various gas sample locations in the pilot plant. Amine solvent sampling is available at various locations throughout the Amine circulation loop as well as the liquid discharge locations for waste assessment. Additionally, the EDF facility is also equipped with an oxygen stripper to study the impact on solvent degradation. The current status of the Alstom Advanced Amine Process at EDF will be discussed in this paper. The presented results include the performance of the UCARSOL™ FGC-3000 Amine solvent evaluated under varied Process conditions in an advanced flow scheme set-up. The test campaign comprised several series of tests, including energy consumption at varied liquid-to-gas flow ratios (L/G) in the absorber while maintaining 90% CO2 removal, the effect of varying Process conditions at a set solvent circulation rate, and the effect of different absorber intercooling and recirculation configurations on energy consumption. Results show that the advanced flow scheme effectively reduced power and energy demand by over 30% at a 90% CO2 capture rate versus a conventional Process scheme with MEA solvent.

  • Advanced Amine Process technology operations and results from demonstration facility at EDF Le Havre
    Energy Procedia, 2014
    Co-Authors: Barath Baburao, Stephen Bedell, Paula Restrepo, David Schmidt, Craig Schubert, Bruce Debolt, Islem Haji, Francis Chopin

    Abstract:

    Alstom Power and The Dow Chemical Company have jointly developed an Advanced Amine Process (AAP) utilizing Dow’s advanced Amine solvent formulation UCARSOL™ FGC-3000 for the capture of CO2 from fossil fuel power plant-generated flue gas. This development effort includes the use of facilities to address operational issues such as energy efficiency and solvent management, along with environmental factors such as emissions and wastes. A new demonstration facility has been constructed in Le Havre, France, through a partnership between Alstom and Électricité de France (EDF) with support from ADEME, the French Environment and Energy Management Agency. This facility is designed to capture 25 tonnes of CO2/day at a 90% capture rate on a slipstream flue gas from a hard coal-fired power plant. The EDF-Le Havre demonstration plant is equipped with flue gas conditioning for controlling the water content, temperature and SOx level of the incoming flue gas stream. The CO2 absorber column contains structured packing selected for optimal CO2 capture efficiency and fluid flow characteristics. The exiting flue gas passes through a water wash section designed to capture residual Amine emissions. Amine solvent management comprises an Amine reclamation system and assisted by an on-site Amine solvent analytical laboratory. The quality of the incoming flue gas, the exiting flue gas and CO2 product gas streams are assessed through various gas sample locations in the pilot plant. Amine solvent sampling is available at various locations throughout the Amine circulation loop as well as the liquid discharge locations for waste assessment. Additionally, the EDF facility is also equipped with an oxygen stripper to study the impact on solvent degradation. The current status of the Alstom Advanced Amine Process at EDF will be discussed in this paper. The presented results include the performance of the UCARSOL™ FGC-3000 Amine solvent evaluated under varied Process conditions in an advanced flow scheme set-up. The test campaign comprised several series of tests, including energy consumption at varied liquid-to-gas flow ratios (L/G) in the absorber while maintaining 90% CO2 removal, the effect of varying Process conditions at a set solvent circulation rate, and the effect of different absorber intercooling and recirculation configurations on energy consumption. Results show that the advanced flow scheme effectively reduced power and energy demand by over 30% at a 90% CO2 capture rate versus a conventional Process scheme with MEA solvent.

  • Technology and pilot plant results of the advanced Amine Process
    Energy Procedia, 2011
    Co-Authors: Frederic Vitse, Barath Baburao, Ross Dugas, Larry Czarnecki, Craig Schubert

    Abstract:

    Abstract The development of CO 2 capture technologies is being pursued by US, European, Japanese and other suppliers in collaboration with utility companies, universities and Governments in the USA, Europe, Canada and Australia. Among the more promising post-combustion solutions is the Advanced Amine Process (AAP), jointly developed by Alstom and The Dow Chemical Company (Dow). This paper describes the AAP pilot plant located at a Dow-owned site in South Charleston, West Virginia, USA. It provides an update on how the experience from the pilot plant is used to improve the design and predicted performance of large-scale demonstration plants. It will summarize pilot plant results and show the progress of the technology development. The pilot plant is Processing flue gas from a bituminous coal-fired boiler with UCARSOL TM FGC 3000 series of solvents, advanced Amine solvents specifically developed by Dow for flue gas applications. The pilot plant has a CO 2 removal capacity of ∼5 tonne CO 2 /day and can capture in excess of 90% of inlet CO 2 . A test program with a wide range of operating conditions provides information on capture performance, including solvent and operational stability. A state-of-the-art laboratory measures solvent composition, CO 2 loading, solvent contamination and degradation species. Long term solvent composition is controlled by a combination of flue gas pre-treatment and solvent reclamation. These results are being used to develop a large-scale demonstration plant (above 250 MWe) under the EU Flagship program in Europe.