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Amine

The Experts below are selected from a list of 309 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

David W C Macmillan – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • photoredox α vinylation of α amino acids and n aryl Amines
    Journal of the American Chemical Society, 2014
    Co-Authors: Adam Noble, David W C Macmillan

    Abstract:

    A new coupling protocol has been developed that allows the union of vinyl sulfones with photoredox-generated α-amino radicals to provide allylic Amines of broad diversity. Direct C–H vinylations of N-aryl tertiary Amines, as well as decarboxylative vinylations of N-Boc α-amino acids, proceed in high yield and with excellent olefin geometry control. The utility of this new allyl Amine forming reaction has been demonstrated via the syntheses of several natural products and a number of established pharmacophores.

Adam Noble – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • photoredox α vinylation of α amino acids and n aryl Amines
    Journal of the American Chemical Society, 2014
    Co-Authors: Adam Noble, David W C Macmillan

    Abstract:

    A new coupling protocol has been developed that allows the union of vinyl sulfones with photoredox-generated α-amino radicals to provide allylic Amines of broad diversity. Direct C–H vinylations of N-aryl tertiary Amines, as well as decarboxylative vinylations of N-Boc α-amino acids, proceed in high yield and with excellent olefin geometry control. The utility of this new allyl Amine forming reaction has been demonstrated via the syntheses of several natural products and a number of established pharmacophores.

Hallvard F. Svendsen – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • kinetics of carbon dioxide absorption into aqueous Amine amino acid salt 3 methylamino propylAmine sarcosine solution
    Chemical Engineering Science, 2011
    Co-Authors: Ugochukwu E. Aronu, Ardi Hartono, Hallvard F. Svendsen

    Abstract:

    Abstract A string of discs contactor apparatus was used to measure the CO 2 absorption kinetics into an unloaded aqueous Amine amino acid salt, 3-(methylamino)propylAmine/sarcosine, SARMAPA solution. The solution was prepared by mixing equinormal proportions of sarcosine, SAR and 3-(methylamino)propylAmine, MAPA. Experiments were carried out for the concentration range 1.0–5.0 kmol m −3 and for temperatures 25–62 °C. The termolecular mechanism was applied to interpret the experimental data after correcting for non-idealities from the ionic strength using an ionic correction factor. A model correlation without the ionic strength correction was found not to give a good fit to the experimental data. The reaction rate constant for aqueous SARMAPA was determined and found to be comparable to values for Amines. It increases significantly with temperature and concentration. The reaction rate constant for water is higher in the SARMAPA system than in Amine systems indicating that water contributes significantly to the overall absorption rate and more than in Amine systems. The reaction order with respect to the amino acid salt, SARMAPA, concentration varies from 1.06 to 1.43 with an average value of 1.21. A simplified approach applied to the complex speciation chemistry of the Amine amino acid salt, AAAS, system gave a good representation of the experimentally observed kinetic rate constant.

  • Kinetics of carbon dioxide absorption into aqueous Amine amino acid salt: 3-(methylamino)propylAmine/sarcosine solution
    Chemical Engineering Science, 2011
    Co-Authors: Ugochukwu E. Aronu, Ardi Hartono, Hallvard F. Svendsen

    Abstract:

    Abstract A string of discs contactor apparatus was used to measure the CO 2 absorption kinetics into an unloaded aqueous Amine amino acid salt, 3-(methylamino)propylAmine/sarcosine, SARMAPA solution. The solution was prepared by mixing equinormal proportions of sarcosine, SAR and 3-(methylamino)propylAmine, MAPA. Experiments were carried out for the concentration range 1.0–5.0 kmol m −3 and for temperatures 25–62 °C. The termolecular mechanism was applied to interpret the experimental data after correcting for non-idealities from the ionic strength using an ionic correction factor. A model correlation without the ionic strength correction was found not to give a good fit to the experimental data. The reaction rate constant for aqueous SARMAPA was determined and found to be comparable to values for Amines. It increases significantly with temperature and concentration. The reaction rate constant for water is higher in the SARMAPA system than in Amine systems indicating that water contributes significantly to the overall absorption rate and more than in Amine systems. The reaction order with respect to the amino acid salt, SARMAPA, concentration varies from 1.06 to 1.43 with an average value of 1.21. A simplified approach applied to the complex speciation chemistry of the Amine amino acid salt, AAAS, system gave a good representation of the experimentally observed kinetic rate constant.