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Aminolysis

The Experts below are selected from a list of 297 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Ajay M. Harad – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Aminolysis of polyethylene terephthalate waste
    Polymer Degradation and Stability, 2006
    Co-Authors: S. R. Shukla, Ajay M. Harad

    Abstract:

    Polyethylene terephthalate in the form of waste fibres and disposable soft drink bottles was subjected to depolymerisation through Aminolysis using excess of ethanolamine in the presence of different simple chemicals, namely glacial acetic acid, sodium acetate and potassium sulphate, as catalysts. The product bis(2-hydroxy ethylene)terephthalamide (BHETA) obtained was in its pure form with sufficiently high yields with all the catalysts. The purified product was characterised by elemental analysis, melting point, IR spectroscopy, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). The process of Aminolysis reported here is economically viable since yields of BHETA are as high as 91%, it has potential for further reactions to obtain useful products and the chemicals used as catalysts are common and cheaply available.

  • Aminolysis of polyethylene terephthalate waste
    Polymer Degradation and Stability, 2006
    Co-Authors: S. R. Shukla, Ajay M. Harad

    Abstract:

    Polyethylene terephthalate in the form of waste fibres and disposable soft drink bottles was subjected to depolymerisation through Aminolysis using excess of ethanolamine in the presence of different simple chemicals, namely glacial acetic acid, sodium acetate and potassium sulphate, as catalysts. The product bis(2-hydroxy ethylene)terephthalamide (BHETA) obtained was in its pure form with sufficiently high yields with all the catalysts. The purified product was characterised by elemental analysis, melting point, IR spectroscopy, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). The process of Aminolysis reported here is economically viable since yields of BHETA are as high as 91%, it has potential for further reactions to obtain useful products and the chemicals used as catalysts are common and cheaply available. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

S. R. Shukla – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Aminolysis of polyethylene terephthalate waste
    Polymer Degradation and Stability, 2006
    Co-Authors: S. R. Shukla, Ajay M. Harad

    Abstract:

    Polyethylene terephthalate in the form of waste fibres and disposable soft drink bottles was subjected to depolymerisation through Aminolysis using excess of ethanolamine in the presence of different simple chemicals, namely glacial acetic acid, sodium acetate and potassium sulphate, as catalysts. The product bis(2-hydroxy ethylene)terephthalamide (BHETA) obtained was in its pure form with sufficiently high yields with all the catalysts. The purified product was characterised by elemental analysis, melting point, IR spectroscopy, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). The process of Aminolysis reported here is economically viable since yields of BHETA are as high as 91%, it has potential for further reactions to obtain useful products and the chemicals used as catalysts are common and cheaply available.

  • Aminolysis of polyethylene terephthalate waste
    Polymer Degradation and Stability, 2006
    Co-Authors: S. R. Shukla, Ajay M. Harad

    Abstract:

    Polyethylene terephthalate in the form of waste fibres and disposable soft drink bottles was subjected to depolymerisation through Aminolysis using excess of ethanolamine in the presence of different simple chemicals, namely glacial acetic acid, sodium acetate and potassium sulphate, as catalysts. The product bis(2-hydroxy ethylene)terephthalamide (BHETA) obtained was in its pure form with sufficiently high yields with all the catalysts. The purified product was characterised by elemental analysis, melting point, IR spectroscopy, Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) and Differential Scanning Calorimetry (DSC). The process of Aminolysis reported here is economically viable since yields of BHETA are as high as 91%, it has potential for further reactions to obtain useful products and the chemicals used as catalysts are common and cheaply available. © 2005 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Hisashi Yamamoto – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • gadolinium catalyzed regio and enantioselective Aminolysis of aromatic trans 2 3 epoxy sulfonamides
    ChemInform, 2015
    Co-Authors: Chuan Wang, Hisashi Yamamoto

    Abstract:

    An unprecedented Aminolysis of epoxy sulfonamides with the sulfonamide moiety as directing group is developed.

  • nickel catalyzed regio and enantioselective Aminolysis of 3 4 epoxy alcohols
    ChemInform, 2015
    Co-Authors: Chuan Wang, Hisashi Yamamoto

    Abstract:

    The regioselective Aminolysis of 3,4-epoxyalcohols using Ni-perchlorate as catalyst is developed.

  • tungsten catalyzed regio and enantioselective Aminolysis of trans 2 3 epoxy alcohols an entry to virtually enantiopure amino alcohols
    ChemInform, 2015
    Co-Authors: Chuan Wang, Hisashi Yamamoto

    Abstract:

    The first catalytic enantioselective Aminolysis of trans-2,3-epoxy alcohols is accomplished in the presence of a tungsten/bis(hydroxamic acid) catalytic system.