Amphiprion - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab



Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Amphiprion

The Experts below are selected from a list of 2484 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Amphiprion – Free Register to Access Experts & Abstracts

Eric Parmentier – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • agonistic sounds in the skunk clownfish Amphiprion akallopisos size related variation in acoustic features
    Journal of Fish Biology, 2009
    Co-Authors: Orphal Colleye, Bruno Frederich, Pierre Vandewalle, Margarida Casadevall, Eric Parmentier

    Abstract:

    Fourteen individuals of the skunk clownfish Amphiprion akallopisos of different sizes and of different sexual status (non-breeder, male or female) were analysed for four acoustic features. Dominant frequency and pulse duration were highly correlated with standard length (r = 0.97), and were not related to sex. Both the dominant frequency and pulse duration were signals conveying information related to the size of the emitter, which implies that these sound characteristics could be useful in assessing size of conspecifics.

    Free Register to Access Article

  • Agonistic sounds in the skunk clownfish Amphiprion akallopisos: size‐related variation in acoustic features
    Journal of fish biology, 2009
    Co-Authors: Orphal Colleye, Bruno Frederich, Pierre Vandewalle, Margarida Casadevall, Eric Parmentier

    Abstract:

    Fourteen individuals of the skunk clownfish Amphiprion akallopisos of different sizes and of different sexual status (non-breeder, male or female) were analysed for four acoustic features. Dominant frequency and pulse duration were highly correlated with standard length (r = 0.97), and were not related to sex. Both the dominant frequency and pulse duration were signals conveying information related to the size of the emitter, which implies that these sound characteristics could be useful in assessing size of conspecifics.

    Free Register to Access Article

  • Sound production in the clownfish Amphiprion clarkii
    Science (New York N.Y.), 2007
    Co-Authors: Eric Parmentier, Orphal Colleye, Michael L. Fine, Bruno Frederich, Pierre Vandewalle, Anthony Herrel

    Abstract:

    Although clownfish sounds were recorded as early as 1930, the mechanism of sound production has remained obscure. Yet, clownfish are prolific “singers” that produce a wide variety of sounds, described as “chirps” and “pops” in both reproductive and agonistic behavioral contexts. Here, we describe the sonic mechanism of the clownfish Amphiprion clarkii.

    Free Register to Access Article

Orphal Colleye – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • agonistic sounds in the skunk clownfish Amphiprion akallopisos size related variation in acoustic features
    Journal of Fish Biology, 2009
    Co-Authors: Orphal Colleye, Bruno Frederich, Pierre Vandewalle, Margarida Casadevall, Eric Parmentier

    Abstract:

    Fourteen individuals of the skunk clownfish Amphiprion akallopisos of different sizes and of different sexual status (non-breeder, male or female) were analysed for four acoustic features. Dominant frequency and pulse duration were highly correlated with standard length (r = 0.97), and were not related to sex. Both the dominant frequency and pulse duration were signals conveying information related to the size of the emitter, which implies that these sound characteristics could be useful in assessing size of conspecifics.

    Free Register to Access Article

  • Agonistic sounds in the skunk clownfish Amphiprion akallopisos: size‐related variation in acoustic features
    Journal of fish biology, 2009
    Co-Authors: Orphal Colleye, Bruno Frederich, Pierre Vandewalle, Margarida Casadevall, Eric Parmentier

    Abstract:

    Fourteen individuals of the skunk clownfish Amphiprion akallopisos of different sizes and of different sexual status (non-breeder, male or female) were analysed for four acoustic features. Dominant frequency and pulse duration were highly correlated with standard length (r = 0.97), and were not related to sex. Both the dominant frequency and pulse duration were signals conveying information related to the size of the emitter, which implies that these sound characteristics could be useful in assessing size of conspecifics.

    Free Register to Access Article

  • Sound production in the clownfish Amphiprion clarkii
    Science (New York N.Y.), 2007
    Co-Authors: Eric Parmentier, Orphal Colleye, Michael L. Fine, Bruno Frederich, Pierre Vandewalle, Anthony Herrel

    Abstract:

    Although clownfish sounds were recorded as early as 1930, the mechanism of sound production has remained obscure. Yet, clownfish are prolific “singers” that produce a wide variety of sounds, described as “chirps” and “pops” in both reproductive and agonistic behavioral contexts. Here, we describe the sonic mechanism of the clownfish Amphiprion clarkii.

    Free Register to Access Article

David J. Miller – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • finding nemo s genes a chromosome scale reference assembly of the genome of the orange clownfish Amphiprion percula
    Molecular Ecology Resources, 2019
    Co-Authors: Robert Lehmann, Michael L. Berumen, Damien J. Lightfoot, Celia Schunter, Craig T. Michell, Hajime Ohyanagi, Katsuhiko Mineta, Sylvain Forêt, David J. Miller

    Abstract:

    The iconic orange clownfish, Amphiprion percula, is a model organism for studying the ecology and evolution of reef fishes, including patterns of population connectivity, sex change, social organization, habitat selection and adaptation to climate change. Notably, the orange clownfish is the only reef fish for which a complete larval dispersal kernel has been established and was the first fish species for which it was demonstrated that antipredator responses of reef fishes could be impaired by ocean acidification. Despite its importance, molecular resources for this species remain scarce and until now it lacked a reference genome assembly. Here, we present a de novo chromosome-scale assembly of the genome of the orange clownfish Amphiprion percula. We utilized single-molecule real-time sequencing technology from Pacific Biosciences to produce an initial polished assembly comprised of 1,414 contigs, with a contig N50 length of 1.86 Mb. Using Hi-C-based chromatin contact maps, 98% of the genome assembly were placed into 24 chromosomes, resulting in a final assembly of 908.8 Mb in length with contig and scaffold N50s of 3.12 and 38.4 Mb, respectively. This makes it one of the most contiguous and complete fish genome assemblies currently available. The genome was annotated with 26,597 protein-coding genes and contains 96% of the core set of conserved actinopterygian orthologs. The availability of this reference genome assembly as a community resource will further strengthen the role of the orange clownfish as a model species for research on the ecology and evolution of reef fishes.

    Free Register to Access Article

  • Finding Nemo’s Genes: A chromosome‐scale reference assembly of the genome of the orange clownfish Amphiprion percula
    Molecular ecology resources, 2018
    Co-Authors: Robert Lehmann, Michael L. Berumen, Damien J. Lightfoot, Celia Schunter, Craig T. Michell, Hajime Ohyanagi, Katsuhiko Mineta, Sylvain Forêt, David J. Miller, Manuel Aranda

    Abstract:

    The iconic orange clownfish, Amphiprion percula, is a model organism for studying the ecology and evolution of reef fishes, including patterns of population connectivity, sex change, social organization, habitat selection and adaptation to climate change. Notably, the orange clownfish is the only reef fish for which a complete larval dispersal kernel has been established and was the first fish species for which it was demonstrated that antipredator responses of reef fishes could be impaired by ocean acidification. Despite its importance, molecular resources for this species remain scarce and until now it lacked a reference genome assembly. Here, we present a de novo chromosome-scale assembly of the genome of the orange clownfish Amphiprion percula. We utilized single-molecule real-time sequencing technology from Pacific Biosciences to produce an initial polished assembly comprised of 1,414 contigs, with a contig N50 length of 1.86 Mb. Using Hi-C-based chromatin contact maps, 98% of the genome assembly were placed into 24 chromosomes, resulting in a final assembly of 908.8 Mb in length with contig and scaffold N50s of 3.12 and 38.4 Mb, respectively. This makes it one of the most contiguous and complete fish genome assemblies currently available. The genome was annotated with 26,597 protein-coding genes and contains 96% of the core set of conserved actinopterygian orthologs. The availability of this reference genome assembly as a community resource will further strengthen the role of the orange clownfish as a model species for research on the ecology and evolution of reef fishes.

    Free Register to Access Article

  • Finding Nemo’s Genes: A chromosome-scale reference assembly of the genome of the orange clownfish Amphiprion percula
    , 2018
    Co-Authors: Robert Lehmann, Michael L. Berumen, Damien J. Lightfoot, Celia Schunter, Craig T. Michell, Hajime Ohyanagi, Katsuhiko Mineta, Sylvain Forêt, David J. Miller, Manuel Aranda

    Abstract:

    The iconic orange clownfish, Amphiprion percula, is a model organism for studying the ecology and evolution of reef fishes, including patterns of population connectivity, sex change, social organization, habitat selection and adaptation to climate change. Notably, the orange clownfish is the only reef fish for which a complete larval dispersal kernel has been established and was the first fish species for which it was demonstrated that anti-predator responses of reef fishes could distinguish predators based on their olfactory cues and that this ability is impaired by ocean acidification. Despite its importance, molecular resources for this species remain scarce and until now it lacked a reference genome assembly. Here we present a de novo chromosome-scale assembly of the genome of the orange clownfish Amphiprion percula. We utilized single-molecule real-time sequencing technology from Pacific Biosciences to produce an initial polished assembly comprised of 1,414 contigs, with a contig N50 length of 1.86 Mb. Using Hi-C based chromatin contact maps, 98% of the genome assembly were placed into 24 chromosomes, resulting in a final assembly of 908.8 Mb in length with contig and scaffold N50s of 3.12 and 38.4 Mb, respectively. This makes it one of the most contiguous and complete fish genome assemblies currently available. The genome was annotated with 26,597 protein coding genes and contains 96% of the core set of conserved actinopterygian orthologs. The availability of this reference genome assembly as a community resource will further strengthen the role of the orange clownfish as a model species for research on the ecology and evolution of reef fishes.

    Free Register to Access Article