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Amylase Isoenzyme

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Andrew W. Bradbury – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Serum Amylase Isoenzymes in patients undergoing operation for ruptured and non-ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm
    Journal of vascular surgery, 1999
    Co-Authors: Donald J. Adam, Alan A. Milne, Stephen M. Evans, Joseph E. Roulston, Amanda J. Lee, C. Vaughan Ruckley, Andrew W. Bradbury

    Abstract:

    Abstract Objective: Previous work has suggested that hyperAmylasemia in patients who undergo operation for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is associated with poor outcome. The aims of this study were to determine, for the first time, the source of serum Amylase in such patients and to examine the prognostic significance of Amylase Isoenzyme expression. Methods: This study was designed as a prospective clinical and laboratory study. The study consisted of 40 patients who underwent operation for ruptured AAA and 10 patients who underwent operation for non-ruptured AAA. The main outcome measures were serum total and pancreatic and salivary Amylase activities determined with enzymatic colorimetric assay before operation and 6 hours after aortic clamp release. Results: Five of 40 patients (12.5%) with rupture and one of 10 patients (10%) with non-rupture had elevated total Amylase levels before operation, and seven of 31 patients (23%) with rupture and five of 10 patients (50%) with non-rupture had elevated total Amylase levels after operation. The preoperative salivary Amylase ( P = .05) and postoperative pancreatic Amylase ( P Conclusion: These data do not support previous works that suggest that hyperAmylasemia is associated with poor outcome in ruptured AAA. By contrast, a low preoperative salivary Amylase level was associated with increased mortality in ruptured AAA and may be a marker of the severity of shock. (J Vasc Surg 1999;30:229-35.)

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Donald J. Adam – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Serum Amylase Isoenzymes in patients undergoing operation for ruptured and non-ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm
    Journal of vascular surgery, 1999
    Co-Authors: Donald J. Adam, Alan A. Milne, Stephen M. Evans, Joseph E. Roulston, Amanda J. Lee, C. Vaughan Ruckley, Andrew W. Bradbury

    Abstract:

    Abstract Objective: Previous work has suggested that hyperAmylasemia in patients who undergo operation for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is associated with poor outcome. The aims of this study were to determine, for the first time, the source of serum Amylase in such patients and to examine the prognostic significance of Amylase Isoenzyme expression. Methods: This study was designed as a prospective clinical and laboratory study. The study consisted of 40 patients who underwent operation for ruptured AAA and 10 patients who underwent operation for non-ruptured AAA. The main outcome measures were serum total and pancreatic and salivary Amylase activities determined with enzymatic colorimetric assay before operation and 6 hours after aortic clamp release. Results: Five of 40 patients (12.5%) with rupture and one of 10 patients (10%) with non-rupture had elevated total Amylase levels before operation, and seven of 31 patients (23%) with rupture and five of 10 patients (50%) with non-rupture had elevated total Amylase levels after operation. The preoperative salivary Amylase ( P = .05) and postoperative pancreatic Amylase ( P Conclusion: These data do not support previous works that suggest that hyperAmylasemia is associated with poor outcome in ruptured AAA. By contrast, a low preoperative salivary Amylase level was associated with increased mortality in ruptured AAA and may be a marker of the severity of shock. (J Vasc Surg 1999;30:229-35.)

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C. Vaughan Ruckley – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Serum Amylase Isoenzymes in patients undergoing operation for ruptured and non-ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm
    Journal of vascular surgery, 1999
    Co-Authors: Donald J. Adam, Alan A. Milne, Stephen M. Evans, Joseph E. Roulston, Amanda J. Lee, C. Vaughan Ruckley, Andrew W. Bradbury

    Abstract:

    Abstract Objective: Previous work has suggested that hyperAmylasemia in patients who undergo operation for ruptured abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) is associated with poor outcome. The aims of this study were to determine, for the first time, the source of serum Amylase in such patients and to examine the prognostic significance of Amylase Isoenzyme expression. Methods: This study was designed as a prospective clinical and laboratory study. The study consisted of 40 patients who underwent operation for ruptured AAA and 10 patients who underwent operation for non-ruptured AAA. The main outcome measures were serum total and pancreatic and salivary Amylase activities determined with enzymatic colorimetric assay before operation and 6 hours after aortic clamp release. Results: Five of 40 patients (12.5%) with rupture and one of 10 patients (10%) with non-rupture had elevated total Amylase levels before operation, and seven of 31 patients (23%) with rupture and five of 10 patients (50%) with non-rupture had elevated total Amylase levels after operation. The preoperative salivary Amylase ( P = .05) and postoperative pancreatic Amylase ( P Conclusion: These data do not support previous works that suggest that hyperAmylasemia is associated with poor outcome in ruptured AAA. By contrast, a low preoperative salivary Amylase level was associated with increased mortality in ruptured AAA and may be a marker of the severity of shock. (J Vasc Surg 1999;30:229-35.)

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