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Anaesthetic Machine

The Experts below are selected from a list of 216 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

J A Berge – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • a simplified concept for controlling oxygen mixtures in the Anaesthetic Machine better cheaper and more user friendly
    Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, 1995
    Co-Authors: J A Berge, L Gramstad, S Grimnes

    Abstract:

    : Modern Anaesthetic Machines are equipped with several safety components to prevent delivery of hypoxic mixtures. However, such a technical development has increased the complexity of the equipment. We report a reconstructed Anaesthetic Machine in which a paramagnetic oxygen analyzer has provided the means to simplify the apparatus. The new Machine is devoid of several components conventionally included to prevent hypoxic mixtures: oxygen failure protection device, reservoir O2 alarm, N2O/air selector, and proportioning system for oxygen/nitrous oxide delivery. These devices have been replaced by a simple safety system using a paramagnetic oxygen analyzer at the common gas outlet, which in a feed-back system cuts off the supply of nitrous oxide whenever the oxygen concentration falls below 25%. The simplified construction of the Anaesthetic Machine has important consequences for safety, cost and user-friendliness. Reducing the complexity of the construction also simplifies the pre-use checkout procedure, and an efficient 5-point check list is presented for the new Machine.

  • A simplified concept for controlling oxygen mixtures in the Anaesthetic Machine — better, cheaper and more user-friendly?
    Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, 1995
    Co-Authors: J A Berge, L Gramstad, S Grimnes

    Abstract:

    : Modern Anaesthetic Machines are equipped with several safety components to prevent delivery of hypoxic mixtures. However, such a technical development has increased the complexity of the equipment. We report a reconstructed Anaesthetic Machine in which a paramagnetic oxygen analyzer has provided the means to simplify the apparatus. The new Machine is devoid of several components conventionally included to prevent hypoxic mixtures: oxygen failure protection device, reservoir O2 alarm, N2O/air selector, and proportioning system for oxygen/nitrous oxide delivery. These devices have been replaced by a simple safety system using a paramagnetic oxygen analyzer at the common gas outlet, which in a feed-back system cuts off the supply of nitrous oxide whenever the oxygen concentration falls below 25%. The simplified construction of the Anaesthetic Machine has important consequences for safety, cost and user-friendliness. Reducing the complexity of the construction also simplifies the pre-use checkout procedure, and an efficient 5-point check list is presented for the new Machine.

  • an evaluation of a time saving Anaesthetic Machine checkout procedure
    European Journal of Anaesthesiology, 1994
    Co-Authors: J A Berge, L Gramstad, S Grimnes

    Abstract:

    : Although it is generally acknowledged that a pre-use checkout of the Anaesthetic Machine significantly improves patient safety, an evaluation of such procedures is uncommon. Previous studies have shown that Anaesthetic personnel using different check routines are unable to detect the majority of pre-set technical malfunctions. We have shown that it is possible to develop an effective and time-saving check procedure by integrating seven simple steps into one continuous flow procedure, where the settings and results of one step are used in the following step to optimize step interaction. The method is a ‘core’ procedure adapted to Machines sold after 1980 according to the current ISO standard (presently undergoing revision). A user inquiry demonstrated that this pre-use check has been easily adopted in departments of anaesthesia. Moreover, the inquiry showed that most departments would not accept a checkout procedure which required more than 5-6 min. A study on nurse anaesthetists performing this procedure in the operating suite showed an average checking time of approximately 3 min. A performance test was undertaken by activating four different malfunctions in an Anaesthetic Machine training simulator. Twelve of 17 nurse anaesthetists rapidly identified all faults, whereas five nurses missed one or two faults. Our study suggests that our check procedure (the seven point check) provides a time-saving method for effective pre-use control of the Anaesthetic Machine.

S Grimnes – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • A simplified concept for controlling oxygen mixtures in the Anaesthetic Machine — better, cheaper and more user-friendly?
    Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, 1995
    Co-Authors: J A Berge, L Gramstad, S Grimnes

    Abstract:

    : Modern Anaesthetic Machines are equipped with several safety components to prevent delivery of hypoxic mixtures. However, such a technical development has increased the complexity of the equipment. We report a reconstructed Anaesthetic Machine in which a paramagnetic oxygen analyzer has provided the means to simplify the apparatus. The new Machine is devoid of several components conventionally included to prevent hypoxic mixtures: oxygen failure protection device, reservoir O2 alarm, N2O/air selector, and proportioning system for oxygen/nitrous oxide delivery. These devices have been replaced by a simple safety system using a paramagnetic oxygen analyzer at the common gas outlet, which in a feed-back system cuts off the supply of nitrous oxide whenever the oxygen concentration falls below 25%. The simplified construction of the Anaesthetic Machine has important consequences for safety, cost and user-friendliness. Reducing the complexity of the construction also simplifies the pre-use checkout procedure, and an efficient 5-point check list is presented for the new Machine.

  • a simplified concept for controlling oxygen mixtures in the Anaesthetic Machine better cheaper and more user friendly
    Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, 1995
    Co-Authors: J A Berge, L Gramstad, S Grimnes

    Abstract:

    : Modern Anaesthetic Machines are equipped with several safety components to prevent delivery of hypoxic mixtures. However, such a technical development has increased the complexity of the equipment. We report a reconstructed Anaesthetic Machine in which a paramagnetic oxygen analyzer has provided the means to simplify the apparatus. The new Machine is devoid of several components conventionally included to prevent hypoxic mixtures: oxygen failure protection device, reservoir O2 alarm, N2O/air selector, and proportioning system for oxygen/nitrous oxide delivery. These devices have been replaced by a simple safety system using a paramagnetic oxygen analyzer at the common gas outlet, which in a feed-back system cuts off the supply of nitrous oxide whenever the oxygen concentration falls below 25%. The simplified construction of the Anaesthetic Machine has important consequences for safety, cost and user-friendliness. Reducing the complexity of the construction also simplifies the pre-use checkout procedure, and an efficient 5-point check list is presented for the new Machine.

  • an evaluation of a time saving Anaesthetic Machine checkout procedure
    European Journal of Anaesthesiology, 1994
    Co-Authors: J A Berge, L Gramstad, S Grimnes

    Abstract:

    : Although it is generally acknowledged that a pre-use checkout of the Anaesthetic Machine significantly improves patient safety, an evaluation of such procedures is uncommon. Previous studies have shown that Anaesthetic personnel using different check routines are unable to detect the majority of pre-set technical malfunctions. We have shown that it is possible to develop an effective and time-saving check procedure by integrating seven simple steps into one continuous flow procedure, where the settings and results of one step are used in the following step to optimize step interaction. The method is a ‘core’ procedure adapted to Machines sold after 1980 according to the current ISO standard (presently undergoing revision). A user inquiry demonstrated that this pre-use check has been easily adopted in departments of anaesthesia. Moreover, the inquiry showed that most departments would not accept a checkout procedure which required more than 5-6 min. A study on nurse anaesthetists performing this procedure in the operating suite showed an average checking time of approximately 3 min. A performance test was undertaken by activating four different malfunctions in an Anaesthetic Machine training simulator. Twelve of 17 nurse anaesthetists rapidly identified all faults, whereas five nurses missed one or two faults. Our study suggests that our check procedure (the seven point check) provides a time-saving method for effective pre-use control of the Anaesthetic Machine.

L Gramstad – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • a simplified concept for controlling oxygen mixtures in the Anaesthetic Machine better cheaper and more user friendly
    Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, 1995
    Co-Authors: J A Berge, L Gramstad, S Grimnes

    Abstract:

    : Modern Anaesthetic Machines are equipped with several safety components to prevent delivery of hypoxic mixtures. However, such a technical development has increased the complexity of the equipment. We report a reconstructed Anaesthetic Machine in which a paramagnetic oxygen analyzer has provided the means to simplify the apparatus. The new Machine is devoid of several components conventionally included to prevent hypoxic mixtures: oxygen failure protection device, reservoir O2 alarm, N2O/air selector, and proportioning system for oxygen/nitrous oxide delivery. These devices have been replaced by a simple safety system using a paramagnetic oxygen analyzer at the common gas outlet, which in a feed-back system cuts off the supply of nitrous oxide whenever the oxygen concentration falls below 25%. The simplified construction of the Anaesthetic Machine has important consequences for safety, cost and user-friendliness. Reducing the complexity of the construction also simplifies the pre-use checkout procedure, and an efficient 5-point check list is presented for the new Machine.

  • A simplified concept for controlling oxygen mixtures in the Anaesthetic Machine — better, cheaper and more user-friendly?
    Acta Anaesthesiologica Scandinavica, 1995
    Co-Authors: J A Berge, L Gramstad, S Grimnes

    Abstract:

    : Modern Anaesthetic Machines are equipped with several safety components to prevent delivery of hypoxic mixtures. However, such a technical development has increased the complexity of the equipment. We report a reconstructed Anaesthetic Machine in which a paramagnetic oxygen analyzer has provided the means to simplify the apparatus. The new Machine is devoid of several components conventionally included to prevent hypoxic mixtures: oxygen failure protection device, reservoir O2 alarm, N2O/air selector, and proportioning system for oxygen/nitrous oxide delivery. These devices have been replaced by a simple safety system using a paramagnetic oxygen analyzer at the common gas outlet, which in a feed-back system cuts off the supply of nitrous oxide whenever the oxygen concentration falls below 25%. The simplified construction of the Anaesthetic Machine has important consequences for safety, cost and user-friendliness. Reducing the complexity of the construction also simplifies the pre-use checkout procedure, and an efficient 5-point check list is presented for the new Machine.

  • an evaluation of a time saving Anaesthetic Machine checkout procedure
    European Journal of Anaesthesiology, 1994
    Co-Authors: J A Berge, L Gramstad, S Grimnes

    Abstract:

    : Although it is generally acknowledged that a pre-use checkout of the Anaesthetic Machine significantly improves patient safety, an evaluation of such procedures is uncommon. Previous studies have shown that Anaesthetic personnel using different check routines are unable to detect the majority of pre-set technical malfunctions. We have shown that it is possible to develop an effective and time-saving check procedure by integrating seven simple steps into one continuous flow procedure, where the settings and results of one step are used in the following step to optimize step interaction. The method is a ‘core’ procedure adapted to Machines sold after 1980 according to the current ISO standard (presently undergoing revision). A user inquiry demonstrated that this pre-use check has been easily adopted in departments of anaesthesia. Moreover, the inquiry showed that most departments would not accept a checkout procedure which required more than 5-6 min. A study on nurse anaesthetists performing this procedure in the operating suite showed an average checking time of approximately 3 min. A performance test was undertaken by activating four different malfunctions in an Anaesthetic Machine training simulator. Twelve of 17 nurse anaesthetists rapidly identified all faults, whereas five nurses missed one or two faults. Our study suggests that our check procedure (the seven point check) provides a time-saving method for effective pre-use control of the Anaesthetic Machine.