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Analysis of Education

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Judith Jacovkis – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • transitions to upper secondary Education in catalonia a sociological Analysis of Education policy
    Education Policy Analysis Archives, 2020
    Co-Authors: Aina Tarabini, Judith Jacovkis

    Abstract:

    Transitions to upper secondary Education are crucial to explain different degrees of social selectivity in diverse Education systems. In Catalonia these transitions are especially relevant as the Education system is formally comprehensive until the end of compulsory secondary schooling, and only at this point the system is divided in two different tracks: the academic and the vocational. The aim of the paper is to analyse the structural, institutional and discursive articulation of this transition point from the perspective of the sociology of the Education policy. Specifically, the paper explores three dimensions of Analysis: the structure of the Education system, the planning of the supply, and the guidance models. The Analysis is based on 28 in-depth interviews with policy makers and stakeholders in the field of upper secondary Education in Barcelona. The results point out to the relevance of the political-institutional articulation, contradictions, tensions and omissions of different Education systems in setting unequal opportunities of Educational transition.

Aina Tarabini – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • transitions to upper secondary Education in catalonia a sociological Analysis of Education policy
    Education Policy Analysis Archives, 2020
    Co-Authors: Aina Tarabini, Judith Jacovkis

    Abstract:

    Transitions to upper secondary Education are crucial to explain different degrees of social selectivity in diverse Education systems. In Catalonia these transitions are especially relevant as the Education system is formally comprehensive until the end of compulsory secondary schooling, and only at this point the system is divided in two different tracks: the academic and the vocational. The aim of the paper is to analyse the structural, institutional and discursive articulation of this transition point from the perspective of the sociology of the Education policy. Specifically, the paper explores three dimensions of Analysis: the structure of the Education system, the planning of the supply, and the guidance models. The Analysis is based on 28 in-depth interviews with policy makers and stakeholders in the field of upper secondary Education in Barcelona. The results point out to the relevance of the political-institutional articulation, contradictions, tensions and omissions of different Education systems in setting unequal opportunities of Educational transition.

David Gillborn – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Education policy as an act of white supremacy whiteness critical race theory and Education reform
    Journal of Education Policy, 2005
    Co-Authors: David Gillborn

    Abstract:

    The paper presents an empirical Analysis of Education policy in England that is informed by recent developments in US critical theory. In particular, I draw on ‘whiteness studies’ and the application of Critical Race Theory (CRT). These perspectives offer a new and radical way of conceptualising the role of racism in Education. Although the US literature has paid little or no regard to issues outside North America, I argue that a similar understanding of racism (as a multifaceted, deeply embedded, often taken-for-granted aspect of power relations) lies at the heart of recent attempts to understand institutional racism in the UK. Having set out the conceptual terrain in the first half of the paper, I then apply this approach to recent changes in the English Education system to reveal the central role accorded the defence (and extension) of race inequity. Finally, the paper touches on the question of racism and intentionality: although race inequity may not be a planned and deliberate goal of Education policy neither is it accidental. The patterning of racial advantage and inequity is structured in domination and its continuation represents a form of tacit intentionality on the part of white powerholders and policy makers. It is in this sense that Education policy is an act of white supremacy. Following others in the CRT tradition, therefore, the paper’s Analysis concludes that the most dangerous form of ‘white supremacy’ is not the obvious and extreme fascistic posturing of small neonazi groups, but rather the taken-for-granted routine privileging of white interests that goes unremarked in the political mainstream.