Anaritide - Explore the Science & Experts | ideXlab

Scan Science and Technology

Contact Leading Edge Experts & Companies

Anaritide

The Experts below are selected from a list of 48 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Robin L. Allgren – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Atrial natriuretic factor in oliguric acute renal failure
    American Journal of Kidney Diseases, 2000
    Co-Authors: Julia B. Lewis, Lawrence S. Weisberg, T C Marbury, Glenn M Chertow, Mahmoud M. Salem, Frank Mcgrew, Robin L. Allgren

    Abstract:

    Abstract Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), an endogenous hormone synthesized by the cardiac atria, has been shown to improve renal function in multiple animal models of acute renal failure. In a recent multicenter clinical trial of 504 patients with acute tubular necrosis (oliguric and nonoliguric), ANP decreased the need for dialysis only in the oliguric patients. In the present study, 222 patients with oliguric acute renal failure were enrolled into a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial designed to assess prospectively the safety and efficacy of ANP compared with placebo. Subjects were randomized to treatment with a 24-hour infusion of ANP (Anaritide, 0.2 μg/kg/min; synthetic form of human ANP) or placebo. Dialysis and mortality status were followed up for 60 days. The primary efficacy end point was dialysis-free survival through day 21. Dialysis-free survival rates were 21% in the ANP group and 15% in the placebo group ( P = 0.22). By day 14 of the study, 64% and 77% of the ANP and placebo groups had undergone dialysis, respectively ( P = 0.054), and 9 additional patients (7 patients, ANP group; 2 patients, placebo group) needed dialysis but did not receive it. Although a trend was present, there was no statistically significant beneficial effect of ANP in dialysis-free survival or reduction in dialysis in these subjects with oliguric acute renal failure. Mortality rates through day 60 were 60% versus 56% in the ANP and placebo groups, respectively ( P = 0.541). One hundred two of 108 (95%) versus 63 of 114 (55%) patients in the ANP and placebo groups had systolic blood pressures less than 90 mm Hg during the study-drug infusion ( P P

  • Prospective study of atrial natriuretic peptide for the prevention of radiocontrast-induced nephropathy.
    American Journal of Kidney Diseases, 1998
    Co-Authors: Brenda R. C. Kurnik, Robin L. Allgren, F. C. Genter, R. J. Solomon, E. R. Bates, Lawrence S. Weisberg

    Abstract:

    Abstract Radiocontrast-induced nephropathy (RCIN) is a common cause of hospital- acquired acute renal failure and is associated with a high mortality rate. RCIN is potentially preventable, because administration of the radiocontrast agent is predictable, and a high-risk population has been identified. This multicenter, prospective, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial was performed to evaluate the efficacy of intravenous atrial natriuretic peptide (Anaritide, ANP 4-28) to prevent RCIN. Patients with stable chronic renal failure (serum creatinine greater than 1.8 mg/dL or serum creatinine between 1.5 and 1.8 mg/dL with estimated creatinine clearance of or = 0.5 mg/dL or a percent increase of > or = 25% over baseline. Of the 247 patients who completed the study, 50% had diabetes mellitus. There were no statistical differences in baseline serum creatinine, change in serum creatinine, or the incidence of RCIN. The incidence of RCIN was placebo, 19%; Anaritide (0.01), 23%; Anaritide (0.05), 23%; Anaritide (0.1), 25%. Patients with diabetes mellitus had a significantly greater incidence of RCIN: placebo, 26% versus 9%; Anaritide (0.01), 33% versus 13%; Anaritide (0.05), 26% versus 21%; Anaritide (0.1), 39% versus 8% (diabetic v nondiabetic, P or = 1.8 mg/dL, with the lowest-risk group, defined as patients without diabetes mellitus and a baseline serum creatinine of 1.8 mg/dL or less, did not show a beneficial effect of Anaritide administration. In conclusion, administration of intravenous Anaritide before and during a radiocontrast study did not reduce the incidence of RCIN in patients with preexisting chronic renal failure, with or without diabetes mellitus. (Am J Kidney Dis 1998 Apr;31(4):674-80)

  • predictors of mortality and the provision of dialysis in patients with acute tubular necrosis the auriculin Anaritide acute renal failure study group
    Journal of The American Society of Nephrology, 1998
    Co-Authors: Glenn M Chertow, Robin L. Allgren, Richard A Lafayette, J M Lazarus, Emil P Paganini, Mohamed H Sayegh

    Abstract:

    To explore the natural history of critically ill patients with acute renal failure due to acute tubular necrosis, we evaluated 256 patients enrolled in the placebo arm of a randomized clinical trial. Death and the composite outcome, death or the provision of dialysis, were determined with follow-up to 60 d. The relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) associated with routinely available demographic, clinical, and laboratory variables were estimated using proportional hazards regression. Ninety-three (36%) deaths were documented; an additional 52 (20%) patients who survived received dialysis. Predictors of mortality included male gender (RR, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.21 to 3.36), oliguria (RR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.43 to 3.55), mechanical ventilation (RR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.18 to 2.93), acute myocardial infarction (RR, 3.14; 95% CI, 1.85 to 5.31), acute stroke or seizure (RR, 3.08; 95% CI, 1.56 to 6.06), chronic immunosuppression (RR, 2.37; 95% CI, 1.16 to 4.88), hyperbilirubinemia (RR, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.08 per 1 mg/dl increase in total bilirubin) and metabolic acidosis (RR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.90 to 0.99 per 1 mEq/L increase in serum bicarbonate concentration). Predictors of death or the provision of dialysis were oliguria (RR, 5.95; 95% CI, 3.96 to 8.95), mechanical ventilation (RR, 1.53; 95% CI, 1.07 to 2.21), acute myocardial infarction (RR, 1.95; 95% CI, 1.24 to 3.07), arrhythmia (RR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.04 to 2.19), and hypoalbuminemia (RR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.42 to 0.74 per 1 g/dl increase in serum albumin concentration). Neither mortality nor the provision of dialysis was related to patient age. These observations can be used to estimate risk early in the course of acute tubular necrosis. Furthermore, these and related models may be used to adjust for case-mix variation in quality improvement efforts, and to objectively stratify patients in future intervention trials aimed at favorably altering the course of hospital-acquired acute renal failure.

Richard A Lafayette – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • predictors of mortality and the provision of dialysis in patients with acute tubular necrosis the auriculin Anaritide acute renal failure study group
    Journal of The American Society of Nephrology, 1998
    Co-Authors: Glenn M Chertow, Robin L. Allgren, Richard A Lafayette, J M Lazarus, Emil P Paganini, Mohamed H Sayegh

    Abstract:

    To explore the natural history of critically ill patients with acute renal failure due to acute tubular necrosis, we evaluated 256 patients enrolled in the placebo arm of a randomized clinical trial. Death and the composite outcome, death or the provision of dialysis, were determined with follow-up to 60 d. The relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) associated with routinely available demographic, clinical, and laboratory variables were estimated using proportional hazards regression. Ninety-three (36%) deaths were documented; an additional 52 (20%) patients who survived received dialysis. Predictors of mortality included male gender (RR, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.21 to 3.36), oliguria (RR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.43 to 3.55), mechanical ventilation (RR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.18 to 2.93), acute myocardial infarction (RR, 3.14; 95% CI, 1.85 to 5.31), acute stroke or seizure (RR, 3.08; 95% CI, 1.56 to 6.06), chronic immunosuppression (RR, 2.37; 95% CI, 1.16 to 4.88), hyperbilirubinemia (RR, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.08 per 1 mg/dl increase in total bilirubin) and metabolic acidosis (RR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.90 to 0.99 per 1 mEq/L increase in serum bicarbonate concentration). Predictors of death or the provision of dialysis were oliguria (RR, 5.95; 95% CI, 3.96 to 8.95), mechanical ventilation (RR, 1.53; 95% CI, 1.07 to 2.21), acute myocardial infarction (RR, 1.95; 95% CI, 1.24 to 3.07), arrhythmia (RR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.04 to 2.19), and hypoalbuminemia (RR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.42 to 0.74 per 1 g/dl increase in serum albumin concentration). Neither mortality nor the provision of dialysis was related to patient age. These observations can be used to estimate risk early in the course of acute tubular necrosis. Furthermore, these and related models may be used to adjust for case-mix variation in quality improvement efforts, and to objectively stratify patients in future intervention trials aimed at favorably altering the course of hospital-acquired acute renal failure.

  • Anaritide in acute tubular necrosis
    The New England Journal of Medicine, 1997
    Co-Authors: Robin L. Allgren, Brenda R. C. Kurnik, Lawrence S. Weisberg, F. C. Genter, T C Marbury, S N Rahman, Andrew Z Fenves, Richard A Lafayette, R M Sweet, John D Conger

    Abstract:

    Background Atrial natriuretic peptide, a hormone synthesized by the cardiac atria, increases the glomerular filtration rate by dilating afferent arterioles while constricting efferent arterioles. It has been shown to improve glomerular filtration, urinary output, and renal histopathology in laboratory animals with acute renal dysfunction. Anaritide is a 25-amino-acid synthetic form of atrial natriuretic peptide. Methods We conducted a multicenter, randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled clinical trial of Anaritide in 504 critically ill patients with acute tubular necrosis. The patients received a 24-hour intravenous infusion of either Anaritide (0.2 μg per kilogram of body weight per minute) or placebo. The primary end point was dialysis-free survival for 21 days after treatment. Other end points included the need for dialysis, changes in the serum creatinine concentration, and mortality. Results The rate of dialysis-free survival was 47 percent in the placebo group and 43 percent in the Anaritide gr…

Mohamed H Sayegh – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • predictors of mortality and the provision of dialysis in patients with acute tubular necrosis the auriculin Anaritide acute renal failure study group
    Journal of The American Society of Nephrology, 1998
    Co-Authors: Glenn M Chertow, Robin L. Allgren, Richard A Lafayette, J M Lazarus, Emil P Paganini, Mohamed H Sayegh

    Abstract:

    To explore the natural history of critically ill patients with acute renal failure due to acute tubular necrosis, we evaluated 256 patients enrolled in the placebo arm of a randomized clinical trial. Death and the composite outcome, death or the provision of dialysis, were determined with follow-up to 60 d. The relative risks (RR) and 95% confidence intervals (95% CI) associated with routinely available demographic, clinical, and laboratory variables were estimated using proportional hazards regression. Ninety-three (36%) deaths were documented; an additional 52 (20%) patients who survived received dialysis. Predictors of mortality included male gender (RR, 2.01; 95% CI, 1.21 to 3.36), oliguria (RR, 2.25; 95% CI, 1.43 to 3.55), mechanical ventilation (RR, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.18 to 2.93), acute myocardial infarction (RR, 3.14; 95% CI, 1.85 to 5.31), acute stroke or seizure (RR, 3.08; 95% CI, 1.56 to 6.06), chronic immunosuppression (RR, 2.37; 95% CI, 1.16 to 4.88), hyperbilirubinemia (RR, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.03 to 1.08 per 1 mg/dl increase in total bilirubin) and metabolic acidosis (RR, 0.95; 95% CI, 0.90 to 0.99 per 1 mEq/L increase in serum bicarbonate concentration). Predictors of death or the provision of dialysis were oliguria (RR, 5.95; 95% CI, 3.96 to 8.95), mechanical ventilation (RR, 1.53; 95% CI, 1.07 to 2.21), acute myocardial infarction (RR, 1.95; 95% CI, 1.24 to 3.07), arrhythmia (RR, 1.51; 95% CI, 1.04 to 2.19), and hypoalbuminemia (RR, 0.56; 95% CI, 0.42 to 0.74 per 1 g/dl increase in serum albumin concentration). Neither mortality nor the provision of dialysis was related to patient age. These observations can be used to estimate risk early in the course of acute tubular necrosis. Furthermore, these and related models may be used to adjust for case-mix variation in quality improvement efforts, and to objectively stratify patients in future intervention trials aimed at favorably altering the course of hospital-acquired acute renal failure.