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Anatomic Model

The Experts below are selected from a list of 153 Experts worldwide ranked by ideXlab platform

Peter Groscurth – 1st expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • evaluation of an Anatomic Model of the paranasal sinuses for endonasal surgical training
    Rhinology, 2007
    Co-Authors: Hans Rudolf Briner, Daniel Simmen, Nick Jones, Darko Manestar, Mirjana Manestar, Axel Lang, Peter Groscurth

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the suitability of a new Anatomic Model of the paranasal sinuses for endonasal surgical training. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective observational pilot study. METHODS: A new Anatomic Model of the paranasal sinuses was developed by the Department of Anatomy at the University of Zurich. The practicability of the Model was evaluated by three experienced endoscopic sinus surgeons with a special focus on its possible use in training. Standardized surgical procedures were performed under simulated real-life conditions in the operating theatre. RESULTS: The endoscopic appearance of the nasal airway closely resembled real human tissue and the detailed anatomy of the Model allowed the same structured surgical steps to be performed as in real life in the absence of bleeding. CONCLUSION: This Anatomic Model is a readily available teaching tool for endoscopic sinus surgeons.

Rudolf Leuwer – 2nd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • Virtual reality: a new paranasal sinus surgery simulator.
    The Laryngoscope, 2010
    Co-Authors: Boris Tolsdorff, Andreas Pommert, Karl Heinz Höhne, Andreas Petersik, Berhnard Pflesser, Ulf Tiede, Rudolf Leuwer

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVES/HYPOTHESIS: Virtual surgical training systems are of growing value. Current prototypes for endonasal sinus surgery simulation are very expensive or lack running stability. No reliable system is available to a notable number of users yet. The purpose of this work was to develop a dependable simulator running on standard PC hardware including a detailed Anatomic Model, realistic tools and handling, stereoscopic view, and force feedback. STUDY DESIGN: Descriptive. METHODS: A three-dimensional voxel Model was created based on a high-resolution computed tomography study of a human skull, from which the bony structures were segmented. The mucosa and organs at risk were added manually. The Model may be manipulated with virtual surgical tools controlled with a low-cost haptic device, which is also used to adjust microscopic or endoscopic views. Visualization, haptic rendering, and tissue removal are represented with subvoxel resolution. RESULTS: The handling of the Model is convincing. The haptic device provides a realistic feeling regarding the interaction between tool tip and anatomy. Three-dimensional orientation and the look and feel of virtual surgical interventions get close to reality. CONCLUSIONS: The newly developed system is a stable, fully operational simulator for sinus surgery based on standard PC hardware. Besides the limitations of a low-cost haptic device, the presented system is highly realistic regarding anatomy, visualization, manipulation, and the appearance of the tools. It is mainly intended for gaining surgical anatomy knowledge and for training navigation in a complex Anatomical environment. Learning effects, including motor skills, have yet to be quantified.

Hans Rudolf Briner – 3rd expert on this subject based on the ideXlab platform

  • evaluation of an Anatomic Model of the paranasal sinuses for endonasal surgical training
    Rhinology, 2007
    Co-Authors: Hans Rudolf Briner, Daniel Simmen, Nick Jones, Darko Manestar, Mirjana Manestar, Axel Lang, Peter Groscurth

    Abstract:

    OBJECTIVES: To assess the suitability of a new Anatomic Model of the paranasal sinuses for endonasal surgical training. STUDY DESIGN: Prospective observational pilot study. METHODS: A new Anatomic Model of the paranasal sinuses was developed by the Department of Anatomy at the University of Zurich. The practicability of the Model was evaluated by three experienced endoscopic sinus surgeons with a special focus on its possible use in training. Standardized surgical procedures were performed under simulated real-life conditions in the operating theatre. RESULTS: The endoscopic appearance of the nasal airway closely resembled real human tissue and the detailed anatomy of the Model allowed the same structured surgical steps to be performed as in real life in the absence of bleeding. CONCLUSION: This Anatomic Model is a readily available teaching tool for endoscopic sinus surgeons.