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Jonesmus Wambua – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Impact of group antenatal care (G-ANC) versus individual antenatal care (ANC) on quality of care, ANC attendANCe and facility-based delivery: A pragmatic cluster-randomized controlled trial in Kenya and Nigeria.
    PloS one, 2019
    Co-Authors: Lindsay Grenier, Mark Kabue, Stephanie Suhowatsky, Brenda Onguti, Eunice Omanga, Anthony Gichangi, Lisa M. Noguchi, Diwakar Mohan, Shalmali Radha Karnad, Jonesmus Wambua
    Abstract:

    Low quality and frequency of antenatal care (ANC) are associated with lower uptake of facility-based deliveries-a key intervention to reduce maternal and neonatal mortality. We implemented group ANC (G-ANC), an alternative service delivery model, in Kenya and Nigeria, to assess its impact on quality and attendANCe at ANC and uptake of facility-based delivery. From October 2016‒January 2018, we conducted a facility-based, pragmatic, cluster-randomized controlled trial with 20 clusters per country. We recruited women <24 weeks gestation during their first ANC visit and enrolled women at intervention facilities who agreed to attend G-ANC in lieu of routine individual ANC. The G-ANC model consisted of five monthly 2-hour meetings with clinical assessments alongside structured gestationally specific group discussions and activities. Quality of care was defined as receipt of eight specific ANC interventions. Data were obtained through facility records and self-report during a home-based postpartum survey. Analysis was by intention to treat. All women who completed follow up are included in the analysis (Nigeria: 1018/1075 enrolled women [94.7%], Kenya: 826/1013 [81.5%]). In Nigeria women in the intervention arm were more likely to have a facility-based delivery compared to those in the control arm (Nigeria: 76.7% [391/510] versus 54.1% [275/508]; aOR 2.30, CI 1.51-3.49). In both countries women in the intervention arm were more likely than those in the control arm to receive quality ANC (Nigeria: aOR 5.8, CI 1.98-17.21, p<0.001; Kenya: aOR 5.08, CI 2.31-11.16, p<0.001) and to attend at least four ANC visits (Nigeria: aOR 13.30, CI 7.69-22.99, p<0.001; Kenya: aOR 7.12, CI 3.91-12.97, p<0.001). G-ANC was associated with higher facility-based delivery rates in Nigeria, where those rates associated with individual ANC were low. In both Kenya and Nigeria it was associated with a higher proportion of women receiving quality ANC and higher frequency of ANC visits.

  • impact of group antenatal care g ANC versus individual antenatal care ANC on quality of care ANC attendANCe and facility based delivery a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial in kenya and nigeria
    PLOS ONE, 2019
    Co-Authors: Lindsay Grenier, Mark Kabue, Stephanie Suhowatsky, Brenda Onguti, Eunice Omanga, Anthony Gichangi, Diwakar Mohan, Shalmali Radha Karnad, Lisa Noguchi, Jonesmus Wambua
    Abstract:

    Background Low quality and frequency of antenatal care (ANC) are associated with lower uptake of facility-based deliveries—a key intervention to reduce maternal and neonatal mortality. We implemented group ANC (G-ANC), an alternative service delivery model, in Kenya and Nigeria, to assess its impact on quality and attendANCe at ANC and uptake of facility-based delivery. Methods From October 2016‒January 2018, we conducted a facility-based, pragmatic, cluster-randomized controlled trial with 20 clusters per country. We recruited women <24 weeks gestation during their first ANC visit and enrolled women at intervention facilities who agreed to attend G-ANC in lieu of routine individual ANC. The G-ANC model consisted of five monthly 2-hour meetings with clinical assessments alongside structured gestationally specific group discussions and activities. Quality of care was defined as receipt of eight specific ANC interventions. Data were obtained through facility records and self-report during a home-based postpartum survey. Analysis was by intention to treat. Findings All women who completed follow up are included in the analysis (Nigeria: 1018/1075 enrolled women [94.7%], Kenya: 826/1013 [81.5%]). In Nigeria women in the intervention arm were more likely to have a facility-based delivery compared to those in the control arm (Nigeria: 76.7% [391/510] versus 54.1% [275/508]; aOR 2.30, CI 1.51–3.49). In both countries women in the intervention arm were more likely than those in the control arm to receive quality ANC (Nigeria: aOR 5.8, CI 1.98–17.21, p<0.001; Kenya: aOR 5.08, CI 2.31–11.16, p<0.001) and to attend at least four ANC visits (Nigeria: aOR 13.30, CI 7.69–22.99, p<0.001; Kenya: aOR 7.12, CI 3.91–12.97, p<0.001). Conclusions G-ANC was associated with higher facility-based delivery rates in Nigeria, where those rates associated with individual ANC were low. In both Kenya and Nigeria it was associated with a higher proportion of women receiving quality ANC and higher frequency of ANC visits.

  • Group versus individual antenatal and first year postpartum care: Study protocol for a multi-country cluster randomized controlled trial in Kenya and Nigeria
    Gates open research, 2019
    Co-Authors: Mark Kabue, Lindsay Grenier, Stephanie Suhowatsky, Jaiyeola Oyetunji, Emmanuel Ugwa, Brenda Onguti, Eunice Omanga, Anthony Gichangi, Jonesmus Wambua, Charles Waka
    Abstract:

    Background: Antenatal care (ANC) in many low- and middle-income countries is under-utilized and of sub-optimal quality. Group ANC (G-ANC) is an intervention designed to improve the experience and provision of ANC for groups of women (cohorts) at similar stages of pregnANCy. Methods: A two-arm, two-phase, cluster randomized controlled trial (cRCT) (non-blinded) is being conducted in Kenya and Nigeria. Public health facilities were matched and randomized to either standard individual ANC (control) or G-ANC (intervention) prior to enrollment. Participants include pregnant women attending first ANC at gestational age

Lindsay Grenier – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Impact of group antenatal care (G-ANC) versus individual antenatal care (ANC) on quality of care, ANC attendANCe and facility-based delivery: A pragmatic cluster-randomized controlled trial in Kenya and Nigeria.
    PloS one, 2019
    Co-Authors: Lindsay Grenier, Mark Kabue, Stephanie Suhowatsky, Brenda Onguti, Eunice Omanga, Anthony Gichangi, Lisa M. Noguchi, Diwakar Mohan, Shalmali Radha Karnad, Jonesmus Wambua
    Abstract:

    Low quality and frequency of antenatal care (ANC) are associated with lower uptake of facility-based deliveries-a key intervention to reduce maternal and neonatal mortality. We implemented group ANC (G-ANC), an alternative service delivery model, in Kenya and Nigeria, to assess its impact on quality and attendANCe at ANC and uptake of facility-based delivery. From October 2016‒January 2018, we conducted a facility-based, pragmatic, cluster-randomized controlled trial with 20 clusters per country. We recruited women <24 weeks gestation during their first ANC visit and enrolled women at intervention facilities who agreed to attend G-ANC in lieu of routine individual ANC. The G-ANC model consisted of five monthly 2-hour meetings with clinical assessments alongside structured gestationally specific group discussions and activities. Quality of care was defined as receipt of eight specific ANC interventions. Data were obtained through facility records and self-report during a home-based postpartum survey. Analysis was by intention to treat. All women who completed follow up are included in the analysis (Nigeria: 1018/1075 enrolled women [94.7%], Kenya: 826/1013 [81.5%]). In Nigeria women in the intervention arm were more likely to have a facility-based delivery compared to those in the control arm (Nigeria: 76.7% [391/510] versus 54.1% [275/508]; aOR 2.30, CI 1.51-3.49). In both countries women in the intervention arm were more likely than those in the control arm to receive quality ANC (Nigeria: aOR 5.8, CI 1.98-17.21, p<0.001; Kenya: aOR 5.08, CI 2.31-11.16, p<0.001) and to attend at least four ANC visits (Nigeria: aOR 13.30, CI 7.69-22.99, p<0.001; Kenya: aOR 7.12, CI 3.91-12.97, p<0.001). G-ANC was associated with higher facility-based delivery rates in Nigeria, where those rates associated with individual ANC were low. In both Kenya and Nigeria it was associated with a higher proportion of women receiving quality ANC and higher frequency of ANC visits.

  • impact of group antenatal care g ANC versus individual antenatal care ANC on quality of care ANC attendANCe and facility based delivery a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial in kenya and nigeria
    PLOS ONE, 2019
    Co-Authors: Lindsay Grenier, Mark Kabue, Stephanie Suhowatsky, Brenda Onguti, Eunice Omanga, Anthony Gichangi, Diwakar Mohan, Shalmali Radha Karnad, Lisa Noguchi, Jonesmus Wambua
    Abstract:

    Background Low quality and frequency of antenatal care (ANC) are associated with lower uptake of facility-based deliveries—a key intervention to reduce maternal and neonatal mortality. We implemented group ANC (G-ANC), an alternative service delivery model, in Kenya and Nigeria, to assess its impact on quality and attendANCe at ANC and uptake of facility-based delivery. Methods From October 2016‒January 2018, we conducted a facility-based, pragmatic, cluster-randomized controlled trial with 20 clusters per country. We recruited women <24 weeks gestation during their first ANC visit and enrolled women at intervention facilities who agreed to attend G-ANC in lieu of routine individual ANC. The G-ANC model consisted of five monthly 2-hour meetings with clinical assessments alongside structured gestationally specific group discussions and activities. Quality of care was defined as receipt of eight specific ANC interventions. Data were obtained through facility records and self-report during a home-based postpartum survey. Analysis was by intention to treat. Findings All women who completed follow up are included in the analysis (Nigeria: 1018/1075 enrolled women [94.7%], Kenya: 826/1013 [81.5%]). In Nigeria women in the intervention arm were more likely to have a facility-based delivery compared to those in the control arm (Nigeria: 76.7% [391/510] versus 54.1% [275/508]; aOR 2.30, CI 1.51–3.49). In both countries women in the intervention arm were more likely than those in the control arm to receive quality ANC (Nigeria: aOR 5.8, CI 1.98–17.21, p<0.001; Kenya: aOR 5.08, CI 2.31–11.16, p<0.001) and to attend at least four ANC visits (Nigeria: aOR 13.30, CI 7.69–22.99, p<0.001; Kenya: aOR 7.12, CI 3.91–12.97, p<0.001). Conclusions G-ANC was associated with higher facility-based delivery rates in Nigeria, where those rates associated with individual ANC were low. In both Kenya and Nigeria it was associated with a higher proportion of women receiving quality ANC and higher frequency of ANC visits.

  • Group versus individual antenatal and first year postpartum care: Study protocol for a multi-country cluster randomized controlled trial in Kenya and Nigeria
    Gates open research, 2019
    Co-Authors: Mark Kabue, Lindsay Grenier, Stephanie Suhowatsky, Jaiyeola Oyetunji, Emmanuel Ugwa, Brenda Onguti, Eunice Omanga, Anthony Gichangi, Jonesmus Wambua, Charles Waka
    Abstract:

    Background: Antenatal care (ANC) in many low- and middle-income countries is under-utilized and of sub-optimal quality. Group ANC (G-ANC) is an intervention designed to improve the experience and provision of ANC for groups of women (cohorts) at similar stages of pregnANCy. Methods: A two-arm, two-phase, cluster randomized controlled trial (cRCT) (non-blinded) is being conducted in Kenya and Nigeria. Public health facilities were matched and randomized to either standard individual ANC (control) or G-ANC (intervention) prior to enrollment. Participants include pregnant women attending first ANC at gestational age

Mark Kabue – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Impact of group antenatal care (G-ANC) versus individual antenatal care (ANC) on quality of care, ANC attendANCe and facility-based delivery: A pragmatic cluster-randomized controlled trial in Kenya and Nigeria.
    PloS one, 2019
    Co-Authors: Lindsay Grenier, Mark Kabue, Stephanie Suhowatsky, Brenda Onguti, Eunice Omanga, Anthony Gichangi, Lisa M. Noguchi, Diwakar Mohan, Shalmali Radha Karnad, Jonesmus Wambua
    Abstract:

    Low quality and frequency of antenatal care (ANC) are associated with lower uptake of facility-based deliveries-a key intervention to reduce maternal and neonatal mortality. We implemented group ANC (G-ANC), an alternative service delivery model, in Kenya and Nigeria, to assess its impact on quality and attendANCe at ANC and uptake of facility-based delivery. From October 2016‒January 2018, we conducted a facility-based, pragmatic, cluster-randomized controlled trial with 20 clusters per country. We recruited women <24 weeks gestation during their first ANC visit and enrolled women at intervention facilities who agreed to attend G-ANC in lieu of routine individual ANC. The G-ANC model consisted of five monthly 2-hour meetings with clinical assessments alongside structured gestationally specific group discussions and activities. Quality of care was defined as receipt of eight specific ANC interventions. Data were obtained through facility records and self-report during a home-based postpartum survey. Analysis was by intention to treat. All women who completed follow up are included in the analysis (Nigeria: 1018/1075 enrolled women [94.7%], Kenya: 826/1013 [81.5%]). In Nigeria women in the intervention arm were more likely to have a facility-based delivery compared to those in the control arm (Nigeria: 76.7% [391/510] versus 54.1% [275/508]; aOR 2.30, CI 1.51-3.49). In both countries women in the intervention arm were more likely than those in the control arm to receive quality ANC (Nigeria: aOR 5.8, CI 1.98-17.21, p<0.001; Kenya: aOR 5.08, CI 2.31-11.16, p<0.001) and to attend at least four ANC visits (Nigeria: aOR 13.30, CI 7.69-22.99, p<0.001; Kenya: aOR 7.12, CI 3.91-12.97, p<0.001). G-ANC was associated with higher facility-based delivery rates in Nigeria, where those rates associated with individual ANC were low. In both Kenya and Nigeria it was associated with a higher proportion of women receiving quality ANC and higher frequency of ANC visits.

  • impact of group antenatal care g ANC versus individual antenatal care ANC on quality of care ANC attendANCe and facility based delivery a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial in kenya and nigeria
    PLOS ONE, 2019
    Co-Authors: Lindsay Grenier, Mark Kabue, Stephanie Suhowatsky, Brenda Onguti, Eunice Omanga, Anthony Gichangi, Diwakar Mohan, Shalmali Radha Karnad, Lisa Noguchi, Jonesmus Wambua
    Abstract:

    Background Low quality and frequency of antenatal care (ANC) are associated with lower uptake of facility-based deliveries—a key intervention to reduce maternal and neonatal mortality. We implemented group ANC (G-ANC), an alternative service delivery model, in Kenya and Nigeria, to assess its impact on quality and attendANCe at ANC and uptake of facility-based delivery. Methods From October 2016‒January 2018, we conducted a facility-based, pragmatic, cluster-randomized controlled trial with 20 clusters per country. We recruited women <24 weeks gestation during their first ANC visit and enrolled women at intervention facilities who agreed to attend G-ANC in lieu of routine individual ANC. The G-ANC model consisted of five monthly 2-hour meetings with clinical assessments alongside structured gestationally specific group discussions and activities. Quality of care was defined as receipt of eight specific ANC interventions. Data were obtained through facility records and self-report during a home-based postpartum survey. Analysis was by intention to treat. Findings All women who completed follow up are included in the analysis (Nigeria: 1018/1075 enrolled women [94.7%], Kenya: 826/1013 [81.5%]). In Nigeria women in the intervention arm were more likely to have a facility-based delivery compared to those in the control arm (Nigeria: 76.7% [391/510] versus 54.1% [275/508]; aOR 2.30, CI 1.51–3.49). In both countries women in the intervention arm were more likely than those in the control arm to receive quality ANC (Nigeria: aOR 5.8, CI 1.98–17.21, p<0.001; Kenya: aOR 5.08, CI 2.31–11.16, p<0.001) and to attend at least four ANC visits (Nigeria: aOR 13.30, CI 7.69–22.99, p<0.001; Kenya: aOR 7.12, CI 3.91–12.97, p<0.001). Conclusions G-ANC was associated with higher facility-based delivery rates in Nigeria, where those rates associated with individual ANC were low. In both Kenya and Nigeria it was associated with a higher proportion of women receiving quality ANC and higher frequency of ANC visits.

  • Group versus individual antenatal and first year postpartum care: Study protocol for a multi-country cluster randomized controlled trial in Kenya and Nigeria
    Gates open research, 2019
    Co-Authors: Mark Kabue, Lindsay Grenier, Stephanie Suhowatsky, Jaiyeola Oyetunji, Emmanuel Ugwa, Brenda Onguti, Eunice Omanga, Anthony Gichangi, Jonesmus Wambua, Charles Waka
    Abstract:

    Background: Antenatal care (ANC) in many low- and middle-income countries is under-utilized and of sub-optimal quality. Group ANC (G-ANC) is an intervention designed to improve the experience and provision of ANC for groups of women (cohorts) at similar stages of pregnANCy. Methods: A two-arm, two-phase, cluster randomized controlled trial (cRCT) (non-blinded) is being conducted in Kenya and Nigeria. Public health facilities were matched and randomized to either standard individual ANC (control) or G-ANC (intervention) prior to enrollment. Participants include pregnant women attending first ANC at gestational age

Neo K Morojele – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • psychosocial factors associated with early initiation and frequency of antenatal care ANC visits in a rural and urban setting in south africa a cross sectional survey
    BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth, 2016
    Co-Authors: Lorrein Shamiso Muhwava, Neo K Morojele, Leslie London
    Abstract:

    Late booking and infrequent antenatal care (ANC) are common but avoidable patient-related risk factors for maternal deaths in South Africa. The aim of the study was to examine the association of psychosocial factors with early initiation of ANC and adequate frequency of attendANCe of ANC clinics among women in an urban and rural location in South Africa. Data from a 2006 cross-sectional household survey of 363 women from the rural Western Cape and 466 women from urban Gauteng provinces of South Africa for risk of alcohol-exposed pregnANCy were analysed. We examined associations between psychosocial variables (self-esteem, cultural influences, religiosity, social capital, social support, pregnANCy desire (wanted versus unwanted pregnANCy), partner characteristics and mental health) and both early ANC first visit (before 16 weeks) and adequate frequency of ANC visits (4 or more visits) for respondents’ last pregnANCy. Overall prevalence among urban women of early ANC initiation was 46 % and 84 % for adequate ANC frequency. Overall prevalence among rural women of early ANC initiation was 45 % and 78 % for adequate ANC frequency. After adjusting for clustering, psychosocial factors associated with early ANC initiation in the urban site were being employed (OR 1.6; 95 % CI 1.0–2.5) and wanted pregnANCy (OR 1.8; 95 % CI 1.1–3.0). For the rural site, early ANC initiation was significantly associated with being married (OR 1.93; 95 % CI 1.0–3.6) but inversely associated with high religiosity (OR 0.5; 95 % CI 0.3–0.8). Adequate frequency of ANC attendANCe in the rural site was associated with wanted pregnANCy (OR 4.2; 95 % CI 1.9–9.3) and the father of the child being present in the respondent’s life (OR 3.0; 95 % CI 1.0–9.0) but inversely associated with having a previous miscarriage (OR 0.4; 95 % CI 0.2–0.8). There were no significant associations between adequate ANC attendANCe and the psychosocial factors in the urban site. The majority of women from both sites attended ANC frequently but less than 50 % initiated ANC before the recommended 16 weeks gestational age. Interventions to reduce prevalence of late ANC booking and inadequate ANC attendANCe should engage religious leaders, address unintended pregnANCy through family planning education and involve male partners in women’s reproductive health.

Anthony Gichangi – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Impact of group antenatal care (G-ANC) versus individual antenatal care (ANC) on quality of care, ANC attendANCe and facility-based delivery: A pragmatic cluster-randomized controlled trial in Kenya and Nigeria.
    PloS one, 2019
    Co-Authors: Lindsay Grenier, Mark Kabue, Stephanie Suhowatsky, Brenda Onguti, Eunice Omanga, Anthony Gichangi, Lisa M. Noguchi, Diwakar Mohan, Shalmali Radha Karnad, Jonesmus Wambua
    Abstract:

    Low quality and frequency of antenatal care (ANC) are associated with lower uptake of facility-based deliveries-a key intervention to reduce maternal and neonatal mortality. We implemented group ANC (G-ANC), an alternative service delivery model, in Kenya and Nigeria, to assess its impact on quality and attendANCe at ANC and uptake of facility-based delivery. From October 2016‒January 2018, we conducted a facility-based, pragmatic, cluster-randomized controlled trial with 20 clusters per country. We recruited women <24 weeks gestation during their first ANC visit and enrolled women at intervention facilities who agreed to attend G-ANC in lieu of routine individual ANC. The G-ANC model consisted of five monthly 2-hour meetings with clinical assessments alongside structured gestationally specific group discussions and activities. Quality of care was defined as receipt of eight specific ANC interventions. Data were obtained through facility records and self-report during a home-based postpartum survey. Analysis was by intention to treat. All women who completed follow up are included in the analysis (Nigeria: 1018/1075 enrolled women [94.7%], Kenya: 826/1013 [81.5%]). In Nigeria women in the intervention arm were more likely to have a facility-based delivery compared to those in the control arm (Nigeria: 76.7% [391/510] versus 54.1% [275/508]; aOR 2.30, CI 1.51-3.49). In both countries women in the intervention arm were more likely than those in the control arm to receive quality ANC (Nigeria: aOR 5.8, CI 1.98-17.21, p<0.001; Kenya: aOR 5.08, CI 2.31-11.16, p<0.001) and to attend at least four ANC visits (Nigeria: aOR 13.30, CI 7.69-22.99, p<0.001; Kenya: aOR 7.12, CI 3.91-12.97, p<0.001). G-ANC was associated with higher facility-based delivery rates in Nigeria, where those rates associated with individual ANC were low. In both Kenya and Nigeria it was associated with a higher proportion of women receiving quality ANC and higher frequency of ANC visits.

  • impact of group antenatal care g ANC versus individual antenatal care ANC on quality of care ANC attendANCe and facility based delivery a pragmatic cluster randomized controlled trial in kenya and nigeria
    PLOS ONE, 2019
    Co-Authors: Lindsay Grenier, Mark Kabue, Stephanie Suhowatsky, Brenda Onguti, Eunice Omanga, Anthony Gichangi, Diwakar Mohan, Shalmali Radha Karnad, Lisa Noguchi, Jonesmus Wambua
    Abstract:

    Background Low quality and frequency of antenatal care (ANC) are associated with lower uptake of facility-based deliveries—a key intervention to reduce maternal and neonatal mortality. We implemented group ANC (G-ANC), an alternative service delivery model, in Kenya and Nigeria, to assess its impact on quality and attendANCe at ANC and uptake of facility-based delivery. Methods From October 2016‒January 2018, we conducted a facility-based, pragmatic, cluster-randomized controlled trial with 20 clusters per country. We recruited women <24 weeks gestation during their first ANC visit and enrolled women at intervention facilities who agreed to attend G-ANC in lieu of routine individual ANC. The G-ANC model consisted of five monthly 2-hour meetings with clinical assessments alongside structured gestationally specific group discussions and activities. Quality of care was defined as receipt of eight specific ANC interventions. Data were obtained through facility records and self-report during a home-based postpartum survey. Analysis was by intention to treat. Findings All women who completed follow up are included in the analysis (Nigeria: 1018/1075 enrolled women [94.7%], Kenya: 826/1013 [81.5%]). In Nigeria women in the intervention arm were more likely to have a facility-based delivery compared to those in the control arm (Nigeria: 76.7% [391/510] versus 54.1% [275/508]; aOR 2.30, CI 1.51–3.49). In both countries women in the intervention arm were more likely than those in the control arm to receive quality ANC (Nigeria: aOR 5.8, CI 1.98–17.21, p<0.001; Kenya: aOR 5.08, CI 2.31–11.16, p<0.001) and to attend at least four ANC visits (Nigeria: aOR 13.30, CI 7.69–22.99, p<0.001; Kenya: aOR 7.12, CI 3.91–12.97, p<0.001). Conclusions G-ANC was associated with higher facility-based delivery rates in Nigeria, where those rates associated with individual ANC were low. In both Kenya and Nigeria it was associated with a higher proportion of women receiving quality ANC and higher frequency of ANC visits.

  • Group versus individual antenatal and first year postpartum care: Study protocol for a multi-country cluster randomized controlled trial in Kenya and Nigeria
    Gates open research, 2019
    Co-Authors: Mark Kabue, Lindsay Grenier, Stephanie Suhowatsky, Jaiyeola Oyetunji, Emmanuel Ugwa, Brenda Onguti, Eunice Omanga, Anthony Gichangi, Jonesmus Wambua, Charles Waka
    Abstract:

    Background: Antenatal care (ANC) in many low- and middle-income countries is under-utilized and of sub-optimal quality. Group ANC (G-ANC) is an intervention designed to improve the experience and provision of ANC for groups of women (cohorts) at similar stages of pregnANCy. Methods: A two-arm, two-phase, cluster randomized controlled trial (cRCT) (non-blinded) is being conducted in Kenya and Nigeria. Public health facilities were matched and randomized to either standard individual ANC (control) or G-ANC (intervention) prior to enrollment. Participants include pregnant women attending first ANC at gestational age