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Qi-ya Zhang – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Establishment of three cell lines from Chinese giant salamander and their sensitivities to the wild-type and recombinant ranavirus
    Veterinary Research, 2015
    Co-Authors: Jiang-di Yuan, Zhong-yuan Chen, Xing Huang, Xiao-chan Gao, Qi-ya Zhang

    Abstract:

    AbstractKnown as lethal pathogens, Ranaviruses have been identified in diseased fish, amphibians (including Chinese giant salamander Andrias davidianus, the world’s largest amphibian) and reptiles, causing organ necrosis and systemic hemorrhage. Here, three Chinese giant salamander cell lines, thymus cell line (GSTC), spleen cell line (GSSC) and kidney cell line (GSKC) were initially established. Their sensitivities to ranaviruses, wild-type Andrias davidianus ranavirus (ADRV) and recombinant Rana grylio virus carrying EGFP gene (rRGV-EGFP) were tested. Temporal transcription pattern of ranavirus major capsid protein (MCP), fluorescence and electron microscopy observations showed that both the wild-type and recombinant ranavirus could replicate in the cell lines.

  • Extensive diversification of MHC in Chinese giant salamanders Andrias davidianus (Anda-MHC) reveals novel splice variants.
    Developmental and comparative immunology, 2013
    Co-Authors: Rong Zhu, Jiang-di Yuan, Zhong-yuan Chen, Jun Wang, Xiang-yong Liao, Jian-fang Gui, Qi-ya Zhang

    Abstract:

    A series of MHC alleles (including 26 class IA, 27 class IIA, and 17 class IIB) were identified from Chinese giant salamander Andrias davidianus (Anda-MHC). These genes are similar to classical MHC molecules in terms of characteristic domains, functional residues, deduced tertiary structures and genetic diversity. The majority of variation between alleles is found in the putative peptide-binding region (PBR), which is driven by positive Darwinian selection. The coexistence of two isoforms in MHC IA, IIA, and IIB alleles are shown: one full-length transcript and one novel splice variant. Despite lake of the external domains, these variants exhibit similar subcellular localization with the full-length transcripts. Moreover, the expression of MHC isoforms are up-regulated upon in vivo and in vitro stimulation with Andrias davidianus ranavirus (ADRV), suggesting their potential roles in the immune response. The results provide insights into understanding MHC variation and function in this ancient and endangered urodele amphibian.

Tomoko Tanaka-ueno – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Reduced genetic variation in the Japanese giant salamander, Andrias japonicus (Amphibia: Caudata)
    Molecular phylogenetics and evolution, 2008
    Co-Authors: Masafumi Matsui, Atsushi Tominaga, Wan-zhao Liu, Tomoko Tanaka-ueno

    Abstract:

    The phylogenetic relationships among 46 samples from 27 populations of the Japanese giant salamander, Andrias japonicus and its congener, A. davidianus from China was investigated, using 3664 bp sequences of the mitochondrial genes NADH1, NADH3, cyt b and CR, partial NADH6 and intervening genes. In phylogenetic trees constructed by MP, ML, and Bayesian methods, the family Cryptobranchidae and the genus Andrias both form monophyletic groups. Japanese A. japonicus and Chinese A. davidianus are sister taxa and can be regarded as separate species despite a small degree of genetic differentiation. Andrias japonicus is divided into central and western clades, but the phylogenetic relationships within the latter clade are unresolved. As previously reported from allozyme analyses, A. japonicus exhibits little genetic differentiation, in strong contrast to salamanders of the genus Hynobius with which their distributions overlap. This reduced genetic variability in A. japonicus is attributable to a unique mating system of polygyny, delayed sexual maturity, notable longevity, life in a stable aquatic environment, and gigantism, as well as bottleneck effects following habitat fragmentation and extinction of local populations during Quaternary glaciations. The species is thus susceptible to extinction by potential environmental fluctuations, and requires extensive conservation measures.

Masafumi Matsui – One of the best experts on this subject based on the ideXlab platform.

  • Development of microsatellite markers for the Japanese giant salamander (Andrias japonicus) through next-generation sequencing, and cross-amplification in its congener
    Conservation Genetics Resources, 2012
    Co-Authors: Natsuhiko Yoshikawa, Masafumi Matsui, Azusa Hayano, Miho Inoue-murayama

    Abstract:

    A giant salamander Andrias japonicus, endemic to western Japan is ranked as near threatened. However, genetic markers necessary for estimating genetic diversity and structures for conservation measures have been limited. Therefore, we developed seventeen novel microsatellite markers from A. japonicus, and tried cross-amplification in its congener, Andrias davidianus. The number of alleles and expected heterozygosity at each locus were 1–5 (mean = 2.53) and 0–0.66, respectively, in A. japonicus. Cross-amplification in A. davidianus succeeded in 15 of 17 loci. The markers described here will be useful for investigating the genetic diversity and genetic structure, and planning conservation management of A. japonicus and A. davidianus.

  • Reduced genetic variation in the Japanese giant salamander, Andrias japonicus (Amphibia: Caudata)
    Molecular phylogenetics and evolution, 2008
    Co-Authors: Masafumi Matsui, Atsushi Tominaga, Wan-zhao Liu, Tomoko Tanaka-ueno

    Abstract:

    The phylogenetic relationships among 46 samples from 27 populations of the Japanese giant salamander, Andrias japonicus and its congener, A. davidianus from China was investigated, using 3664 bp sequences of the mitochondrial genes NADH1, NADH3, cyt b and CR, partial NADH6 and intervening genes. In phylogenetic trees constructed by MP, ML, and Bayesian methods, the family Cryptobranchidae and the genus Andrias both form monophyletic groups. Japanese A. japonicus and Chinese A. davidianus are sister taxa and can be regarded as separate species despite a small degree of genetic differentiation. Andrias japonicus is divided into central and western clades, but the phylogenetic relationships within the latter clade are unresolved. As previously reported from allozyme analyses, A. japonicus exhibits little genetic differentiation, in strong contrast to salamanders of the genus Hynobius with which their distributions overlap. This reduced genetic variability in A. japonicus is attributable to a unique mating system of polygyny, delayed sexual maturity, notable longevity, life in a stable aquatic environment, and gigantism, as well as bottleneck effects following habitat fragmentation and extinction of local populations during Quaternary glaciations. The species is thus susceptible to extinction by potential environmental fluctuations, and requires extensive conservation measures.